Jointer woes - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 38 Old 09-10-2015, 04:36 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the support and suggestions. I gave up and I am using a hand plane.
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post #22 of 38 Old 09-10-2015, 04:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Treat the jointer like a giant hand plane. You have to sight your boards for curves and straight before you start jointing. If you have a reference straight edge and want top make a mark to plane to that's fine.

The jointer is NOT a one pass does it all machine. It needs the operator's help. If you plane/joint in from one end then flip it around and plane in from the opposite end .... eventually you will have removed the curve from the board and THEN you can run a full length pass. I do this all the time. Use the tool like you own and understand it.
This is a very key observation/statement. I believe that too many people believe that you only have to run the wood from one direction. That leads to errors.

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post #23 of 38 Old 09-10-2015, 09:29 PM
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On a board that is bowed inward like the OP is describing you start the cut in the center of the board and then reverse it and do the same. If the board is bowed outward you start the cut with the board just touching the rear table and keep doing it until it cuts to the end. On both applications once the board is straight then you can run it end to end.
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post #24 of 38 Old 09-13-2015, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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My 50" straight edge arrived yesterday. The outfeed table droops!!

I have read the owners manual about how to set up the tables but so far I cannot get the outfeed table raised enough on the edge of the table to be coplanar with the infeed table.

I have a Delta 37-190. If there is someone with experience with this specific jointer I would really like to hear from you!
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post #25 of 38 Old 09-13-2015, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Froglips View Post
My 50" straight edge arrived yesterday. The outfeed table droops!!

I have read the owners manual about how to set up the tables but so far I cannot get the outfeed table raised enough on the edge of the table to be coplanar with the infeed table.

I have a Delta 37-190. If there is someone with experience with this specific jointer I would really like to hear from you!
Jointers are pretty universal when it comes to adjusting for co-planer. You need to shim the gibs. Shims can be made from soda cans or other thin metal.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQIcLWPtFcw

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-13-2015 at 03:46 PM.
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post #26 of 38 Old 09-13-2015, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Froglips View Post
My 50" straight edge arrived yesterday. The outfeed table droops!!

I have read the owners manual about how to set up the tables but so far I cannot get the outfeed table raised enough on the edge of the table to be coplanar with the infeed table.

I have a Delta 37-190. If there is someone with experience with this specific jointer I would really like to hear from you!
Be sure to look the jointer over very good to see just why the table droops. Look for cracks or something damaged. I've been around jointers all my life and I've never seen one that the tops were not level with each other. The machine may have been dropped and need some welding or other repair before you level it.
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post #27 of 38 Old 09-14-2015, 12:57 PM
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Thanks for all the support and suggestions. I gave up and I am using a hand plane.
Another thing you might consider is a long aluminum straight edge and a router.

http://rdowney.com/billswildwestarca...es/image5.html
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post #28 of 38 Old 09-15-2015, 12:58 PM
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a six foot board is a bit big to handle on a 6" delta jointer. Especially if there is serious cupping on the board. Using a jack hand plane (#5) on the concave ends will help make the jointer more effective, and make the boards easier and safer to handle. Good luck.
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post #29 of 38 Old 09-15-2015, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Froglips View Post
My 50" straight edge arrived yesterday. The outfeed table droops!!

I have read the owners manual about how to set up the tables but so far I cannot get the outfeed table raised enough on the edge of the table to be coplanar with the infeed table.

I have a Delta 37-190. If there is someone with experience with this specific jointer I would really like to hear from you!
There is some info here, Wayne Jaques post, , perhaps you have already tried this:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...ng/qvI3xHnJwTU

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #30 of 38 Old 09-17-2015, 05:17 PM Thread Starter
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Better but big boards sag the table

Using my new 50" straight edge and the video on shimming I have successfully returned my infeed and outfeed tables to co-planar.
I used my A-Line to set the blade heights.

I jointered 2" x 3" x 4' boards and when you lay them together you can't even see the seam. Thanks everyone for the hints, suggestions, links, etc.!

After successfully jointing maple boards almost the same length but half the weight (and failing to joint 2" x 6" x 6' without a cup), I have concluded that the weight of the larger boards is sagging the table despite my efforts to use supports on both the out feed and infeed end.

The options I have thought of are:
1) Go back to the table saw and shave a bit off the edge but my experience has been that a table saw, no matter how hard I work on the set up, ever rips a perfect 90 degree corner
2) Go back and rip the 2" x 6" boards into 2" x 3" boards since I know I can joint those
3) Continue with the jack plane which will take at least a week if getting the first boards cup out is any indication

Other ideas?
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post #31 of 38 Old 09-17-2015, 05:38 PM
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see if you can lift the outfeed table

Lift the outfeed table to see if it shifts under upward pressure. If so, tighten the gib screws a bit more.

When I set my roller supports for longer boards I use the longest straight edge I have, a 10 ft aluminum section. I slide the aluminum over to the first roller and if it hits, I lower it a bit. Another way is to lay the straight edge on the table, clamp it and sneak the roller up under it gradually raising it at the same time until it touches.

Did I mention I don't like roller supports?

You should also know that ripping a slightly curved board on the table saw will result in a repeat of that curve on the cut pieces. A straight line rip jig will almost guarantee a good edge on boards up to 8 ft long, at least in my experience. It's easier and faster than a jointer by far. If you can't get a 90 degree edge then, your blade is not 90 degrees to the table... it's that simple. A good, sharp blade will leave a surface clean enough for gluing, but you will need 90 degree edges.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #32 of 38 Old 09-17-2015, 08:51 PM
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See, i purposely make a hollow joint for gluing up panels.

I can adjust my outfeed table to make the cut. Less clamps and it will eliminate any shrinkage seperation at the ends of the panel
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post #33 of 38 Old 09-17-2015, 08:58 PM
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Sometimes a cabinet maker will want to put a little curve in a board for spring back when it's glued up. It's a pretty sophisticated method in my book, so I don't do it. I hate roller stands .......
Quote:
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See, i purposely make a hollow joint for gluing up panels.

I can adjust my outfeed table to make the cut. Less clamps and it will eliminate any shrinkage seperation at the ends of the panel
The cabinet maker speaks .......

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #34 of 38 Old 09-18-2015, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
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Even with four 3/4" pipe clamps I can not bend the boards enough to make a tight joint.

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See, i purposely make a hollow joint for gluing up panels.

I can adjust my outfeed table to make the cut. Less clamps and it will eliminate any shrinkage seperation at the ends of the panel
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post #35 of 38 Old 09-18-2015, 09:53 AM
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I've always jointed the wood until there were no gaps. I believe that any gap in a joint creates pressure against the joint trying to pull it apart.
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post #36 of 38 Old 09-18-2015, 10:44 AM
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Its not 1/8" gaps, more like a sheet of paper or two.

One clamp per small panel.
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post #37 of 38 Old 09-19-2015, 09:55 AM
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Another thing you might consider: a spring joint. Most woodworking instructors emphasize perfectly straight boards for gluing table tops, but the spring joint helps with separation on the ends. It's an advanced technique.

http://www.tommymac.us/blog/spring-joints/
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post #38 of 38 Old 09-19-2015, 10:13 AM
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that has been covered two posts above

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeldwilson View Post
Another thing you might consider: a spring joint. Most woodworking instructors emphasize perfectly straight boards for gluing table tops, but the spring joint helps with separation on the ends. It's an advanced technique.

http://www.tommymac.us/blog/spring-joints/
It has been mentioned....
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings
Sometimes a cabinet maker will want to put a little curve in a board for spring back when it's glued up. It's a pretty sophisticated method in my book, so I don't do it. I hate roller stands .......

Quote:
Originally Posted by WarnerConstInc.
See, i purposely make a hollow joint for gluing up panels.

I can adjust my outfeed table to make the cut. Less clamps and it will eliminate any shrinkage seperation at the ends of the panel

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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