Installing new guide rails for Biesemeyer style fence setup - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 24 Old 12-19-2015, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Danny870 View Post
Well, I understand that I don't "absolutely" have to have a drill press for this purpose, however, it will serve me well for drilling hinge holes in the cabinet doors that I build. I would really like to have a MiniDrill or whatever they are called, which are basically dedicated bench too hinge drilling machines. I plan to do about 40 to 50 doors a month, so eventually I will need one, now I just need to pick up this drill press from Harbor Freight and find a good Blum style hinge jig.

A drill press is a pretty crappy way to have to do that many doors per month.

Quality 'dedicated' hinge boring machines are not sold at HF last time I checked...



A 'quality' hinge boring machine is going to be able to do all three holes at the same time, have dust collections provisions, and all the adjustments will be in millimeters.

No additional Blum jigs or doodads will be required when using them either...


The Blum machines I have seen or used are not so great in the chip / dust collection department. Not much different in dust collection design than sticking the DC hose behind the bit on a drill press when boring doors. (1/2 of your mess will still end up on the floor like that)

I run a 4" dust port on the back of this (sucked at darn close to 1700cfm) and even added custom plexi shielding to the sides to help better direct the suction and STILL lose 10% to the floor.



Would be much worse with a Blum machine...

40 to 50 doors per month justify having good tools to do them with.
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post #22 of 24 Old 12-19-2015, 10:37 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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If you are on a tight budget

A drill press with a fence and stops will make short work of the 35 mm cup hinge pockets:








A small jig like this will work for limited numbers of doors:



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #23 of 24 Old 12-20-2015, 12:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnealWoodworking
A drill press is a pretty crappy way to have to do that many doors per month. Quality 'dedicated' hinge boring machines are not sold at HF last time I checked... A 'quality' hinge boring machine is going to be able to do all three holes at the same time, have dust collections provisions, and all the adjustments will be in millimeters. No additional Blum jigs or doodads will be required when using them either... The Blum machines I have seen or used are not so great in the chip / dust collection department. Not much different in dust collection design than sticking the DC hose behind the bit on a drill press when boring doors. (1/2 of your mess will still end up on the floor like that) I run a 4" dust port on the back of this (sucked at darn close to 1700cfm) and even added custom plexi shielding to the sides to help better direct the suction and STILL lose 10% to the floor. Would be much worse with a Blum machine... 40 to 50 doors per month justify having good tools to do them with.
Last time I checked HF doesn't sell quality anything.
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post #24 of 24 Old 12-20-2015, 07:17 AM Thread Starter
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It does not have to be 'exactly' 13/16" down to work fine but you want to 'try' to have it the same distance down on both sides if you can help it. A 1/16 (or 1/8th) variation one way or the other from that 13/16" spec will not matter.


This is why:


Notice how the fences on each side are able to be adjusted up and down...

You got room to play with here...

The reason that you want to 'try' to get the distance down from the top of the table saw the same on both sides of the square tubing is so that 'if' you generally run your fences very close to the top of the table saw - They will stay that way as you move from left to right.

If one side of the square tubing is higher that the other - The distance between the bottom of the fence and the top of the table will increase as you move towards the 'high side' of the tubing. This slight variation may not even matter to most people depending on what you are cutting (the material thickness).

Fence on far left of picture is factory - Other two are replacements I made myself. The replacement fences I made work, fit and adjust exactly like the factory fences do.

If you plan to 'use' your saw a lot you will likely want a replacement fence or two laying around somewhere...
Ok, I was not aware of that. That makes me feel more confident in getting these new guide rails installed! It shouldn't be too hard to get it level from left to right.

My plan is to cut some oak or hard maple into two strips, one being 3/4" and the other being 13/16". Then I plan to use the 3/4" piece as a spacer to get the tubing attached to the angle iron, and then once that is om, clamp the tubing & angle iron in place using the 13/16" piece as a spacer so that I can use a punch to mark where the holes need to be, then take it apart to drill the holes. Does that sound like a good way of doing this?
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