Help me choose a table saw ~$1000 or less - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 34 Old 05-25-2011, 09:18 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I have a Festool TS75 and lots of tracks...

I've had it for about 3 months, and have yet to use it to do anything. I also have a few table saws....someone them are bolted together. There is no way in he** I would get rid of them, or replace them with a Festool as the only saw. If it took 2 years to "retrain your mind" that's 2 years longer than it would take on a table saw and you could be "making money" for the last 2 years. I got my first powered saw, a 8 1/4" Skil in 1956 and my first table saw, a 10 Craftsman in 1960.....a few years of sawing experience here.
I can't image making a tenon on a "guided saw" or a few other cuts, dados? on a guided saw. The best use for them in my opinion and that's all I can give here is for "on site" breakdown of sheet goods. By the time you cart the 118" track around and a few other tracks and the folding table, I'd just as soon take my Bosch 4000 and the Bosch sliding miter saw.
I can only relate to the Festool, not the eurekazone tools. Their site and videos were hard acquire any good information from.
I don't believe THIS thread is a place to debate this issue although I'm guilty of that myself somewhat.
I am very happy with a 22124 Craftsman/Orion 10" 1 3/4 HP Hybrid saw
Cast iron tables and actual Biesemeyer fence unfortunately discontinued by Craftsman.
bill

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post #22 of 34 Old 05-25-2011, 10:36 PM
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Hey guys it was 2 years before i retrained enough to no longer need my table saw to work as efficiently or I felt comfortable without it on the job. I am not a newbie to woodworking I have been a professional carpenter for 25 years. Currently I specialize in custom interior and exterior trim and cabinet installation. If I had only a small shop to work in, the ez system offers a lot more bang for your buck. Most of the other track saw systems are just that a track saw. If you haven't used the system then it is difficult to fully give a opinion on whether it can do the job of a table saw. the retraining was 23 plus years of using a table saw and making that my first choice by habit.
What I really mean to say is that you really shouldn't judge a product if you haven't used it. The ez system is a american made product that supports american jobs. It is not good to bury our heads in the sand and ignore new ways if we haven't tried them. If we did that we would still be riding horse and buggies and using hand saws.
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post #23 of 34 Old 06-06-2011, 02:50 PM Thread Starter
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I am going to dig this post up as I am still undecided about what to get and driving myself crazy. First off, thanks for the responses - they have been very helpful as far as opening my eyes to different options. I basically have my decision narrowed down to either the Grizzly G1023RLW (with router insert), or the Rigid R4512. I know, two totally different saws. Here is where I am coming from.

The Grizzly would be all the saw I'll ever need and I'd be done with it. It also has the built-in router table which saves me ~$300-400 and the time of building one (although that would also be a fun "chore"). However, I would have to deal with adding a 220v circuit to an already cramped electrical panel. And I would need to purchase a mobile base as well - and figure out how to integrate that with the additional support legs for the router extension. Of course, Grizzly has a great name associated with it, and with the exception of a few of the comments I've heard about the G7015, seems to put out a well calibrated and in-tolerance product. Plus, I would get the quality of cabinet-mounted trunnions and a full cast iron table, as well as the additional power that the G1023 offers.

On the other hand, at less than 1/2 the price (including a mobile base) and simple 120 volt electrical requirements, The Ridgid would be the easier decision and may be all the saw I really need right now. Although I have the funds and am sure I could get the spousal approval for the Grizzly, a table saw isn't the only thing on my wishlist and being able to put $800 towards something else would be nice. If I go with the Ridgid, I would ultimately plan on upgrading a few years down the road once I build a shop - unless I find the Ridgid perfectly adequate. I have read quite a few comments about the perceived short-comings of the Ridgid but the few user reviews of the Ridgid that I have been able to find seem to be pretty favorable.

So, here's the thing. Although I certainly do my fair share of woodworking, I don't think I am quite as dedicated of a woodworker as most of the others on this board. I am a DIY kind of guy and prefer to build things such as file cabinets, speaker boxes, entertainment centers, poker table, etc... myself rather than buy them due to the superior results I can typically attain and the cost savings. I do have a big list of things to build, but at the same time, I don't typically go out and build things just for the joy of working with wood - though I like to be proud of what I build. If the Ridgid will get me by and not constantly frustrate me, I think that would likely be my choice. However, I just don't want to be telling myself, "I wish I would have just bought the Grizzly" everytime I use the Ridgid.

I keep going back and forth. Sometimes I am convinced and determined that I should buy the Grizzly, and then the next day I think that the Grizzly is overkill and that the Ridgid will be plenty of saw for me and be the responsible choice. I think I just need someone just tell me what to do! Anyone got anything else to ad?

Thanks,

Matt
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post #24 of 34 Old 06-06-2011, 03:53 PM
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If you think you will be wishing you bought the Grizzly, you answered your own question. If you think you will upgrade the Rigid saw in the future, you also answered your own question.

My advice is get the Grizzly and don't look back. It will be less expensive than buying the lesser saw today and upgrading in the future. You will have no regrets getting the better saw, but will have doubt and regrets if you go with the lesser saw.

That is my two cents and my humble opinion.

As to the cramped circuit panel, add a sub panel like myself. Much cleaner and easier.
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post #25 of 34 Old 06-06-2011, 07:47 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks mwhals. I agree that I don't want to regret not buying the better saw - but I also don't want to regret spending 3 times what I really might need to spend. I guess part of my question is whether I would regret, or be happy with the Ridgid - keeping in mind I am coming from no table saw at all, other than using my father-in-laws old contractor Craftsman. I am just not sure that my requirements are as high as some of the other board members. Sure, if money were no object I would buy the Grizzly (or a Powermatic, or a SawStop). But there is an opportunity cost to getting the more expensive table saw and I just want to make sure I am being smart. The Grizzly would certainly be more powerful and effortless, but is it going to give me that much better results, consistency and solid performance over the Ridgid?

Thanks again for the advice, and I will certainly take it into consideration. And I promise to make a decision soon and put an end to this thread...

Matt
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post #26 of 34 Old 06-06-2011, 08:24 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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here's a little free advice...

You said:

So, here's the thing. Although I certainly do my fair share of woodworking, I don't think I am quite as dedicated of a woodworker as most of the others on this board. I am a DIY kind of guy and prefer to build things such as file cabinets, speaker boxes, entertainment centers, poker table, etc... myself rather than buy them due to the superior results I can typically attain and the cost savings. I do have a big list of things to build, but at the same time, I don't typically go out and build things just for the joy of working with wood - though I like to be proud of what I build. If the Ridgid will get me by and not constantly frustrate me, I think that would likely be my choice. However, I just don't want to be telling myself, "I wish I would have just bought the Grizzly" everytime I use the Ridgid.

If you think about this over a time period of say 15 - 20 years, the life of a saw, and amortize the cost over that period, the additional cost of the Grizzly will be negligible. Even $500.00 over 5 years is only $100.00 per year. There is something satisfying about the heft and feel of a quality tool when you are using it, when you hear it run and when the work comes out as precisely as you planned it and cut it. I have older Craftsman saws, a Bosch job site saw, a new Craftsman Hybrid saw and a big 5 HP 12" Powermatic. They are all really great tools in their own realm.
A Biesemeyer fence makes a great difference in repeatability of parallel rips. Even if you start out as a DIY guy, you will not regret a quality saw when and if you evolve into higher quailty projects. In fact a really good saw will inspire you to higher standards. This is not to say that quailty work can't be done on lesser tools, but really good work requires a passion not all of us possess. bill

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post #27 of 34 Old 06-06-2011, 09:58 PM
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Come on guys/gals. Someone with a nice Unisaw,, should sell it to this guy, for a fair price, and buy that Saw Stop, you've been wanting to buy.
A win win deal!

To the orig. poster. Have you called or emailed any used machinery places?
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post #28 of 34 Old 06-06-2011, 11:10 PM
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I've never regretted buying the "upgrade" the first time around, but have definitely regretted settling for less tool. My cabinet saw was my 4th new saw. It's definitely easier and cheaper to buy the cabinet saw now as opposed to in a few years. My 2nd and 3rd saws were plenty capable for hobby work (GI 50-185, Cman 22124), but there's really no comparison when you fire up a 3hp cabinet saw and cut with it.
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post #29 of 34 Old 06-07-2011, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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OK, OK, you all have me convinced that I should go for the G1023. Not sure exactly what my timeline is, but hopefully by the end of June. It's never a done deal until it's sitting in my garage though - and I'm still going to keep an eye on CL for that once in a lifetime deal until I make the purchase. Think I'll opt for the version without the router insert actually. It's a bit less expensive ($107 once shipping and sales tax is factored in) and it seems like it would be easier to move around and deal with. It will give me a great first project of building a router table, plus I could always add it later or build me own extension if I decide I really want it later. Living in Washington and buying from a Washington-based company sucks to the tune of an extra 7% tax. On smaller items I don't worry about it too much, but on larger items is can add quite a bit to the cost. Wonder if Grizzly ever gives breaks to Washington residents. It sure would be nice to have the subsidize the sales tax - though I know they still need to make their profit.

Thanks again for all of the replies and advice.

Matt
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post #30 of 34 Old 06-07-2011, 02:15 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Good choice on the routertable-less saw

Here's my reason if you do want to marry a router table onto the saw get one that allows for a rectangular plate for a lift. Other wise you will want a router that's height adjustable from the base/upside down. There are a few Triton. Milwaukee, Freud, others. Another thing you don want to use the table saw fence for both the router and table saw. It requires changing the set up on the router just to rip another piece.....PITA. Use separate fences.
A router lift that locks on height is a joy to use Jessem Mast R Lift II, I think...anyway the newest one. I have both and the height does change as you are routing believe it or not ...DAMHIK Good choice on the Grizzly. You'll be impressed with the quality. I have a few Grizz's in the shop. bill

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post #31 of 34 Old 06-08-2011, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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So I called Grizzly just to check the stock of the 1023 and they are back ordered until the end of July :(. They do have the G0690 on sale right now, but that would be over $1400 and probably out of my price range. I was hoping to get something in the next few weeks, but even the the G1023RL at $1200 was pushing it. Here's the other thing. I was looking at CL today and saw a Ridgid 3650 that seemed to be in good shape for $150. I am considering going with that for the time being. Then, when the 1023 becomes available and I am ready to buy one, I am sure I could sell the Ridgid for very near what I paid for it. Make sense? The 3650 was a decent saw for what it is, right? I just want something that will be reasonably accurate and usable so that I can get going on a few projects that I have lined up.

Matt
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post #32 of 34 Old 06-08-2011, 02:35 PM
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$150 for a 3650 in good shape is a good deal, so it'd have little to no depreciation. It's no cabinet saw but is a good saw...if it's in really nice shape, you might be able to make another $50-$100 toward your dream saw. If you put a good blade on it and align it well, it should do a good job for you.
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post #33 of 34 Old 06-10-2011, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toollovingschultz View Post
Matt If you don't have a shop full of tools yet don't waste your money on a table saw check out the ez one woodworking system from eurekazone. I have sold 2 table saws since I bought my eurekazone system and it has allowed me to turn my van into a portable woodworking shop. http://www.eurekazone.com/ check this system out watch the you tube videos.

I just ripped a 3/4 " x 3/4" x 6" piece of wood, into 1/8" strips.
How do you go about this with a Eurekazone, or other track guided saw?
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post #34 of 34 Old 06-11-2011, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate View Post
I just ripped a 3/4 " x 3/4" x 6" piece of wood, into 1/8" strips.
How do you go about this with a Eurekazone, or other track guided saw?
Pirate I can cut those all day long with my powerbench from eurekazone and never get my fingers anywhere near a spinning blade. Look at the you tube videos of Dino cutting small pieces on his power bench. all I have to do is set the fence and cut. That is the beauty of the power bench small repeatable cuts and no safety compromise.
Andy

Last edited by toollovingschultz; 07-26-2011 at 10:12 PM.
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