Gifted a planer/ jointer , need advice... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 02-29-2008, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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Gifted a planer/ jointer , need advice...

Hi !
It's been a while since I've been on the board , and I have some questions about this machine .
Ok , first off it's an older 6" craftsman unit with 2 knives on the cutterhead . It must be at least 20 years old .. It was somewhat rusty , but cleaned up okay .
should I ..
A : Sell it immediately .
B: Try to make it work .( the motor spins and it came with spare knives & belts) .
It seems that most jointer's have 3 blades & there is probably a reason for this .
And , If I may ask , how does one set the darn blades on these things ?!!


Thanks ,
Bud

Last edited by BudK; 02-29-2008 at 03:00 PM. Reason: I think even slower than I can type ......
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post #2 of 9 Old 02-29-2008, 04:38 PM
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I just picked a 4" Rockwell/Delta out of the trash. Nothing moved and it looked awful. Well, a good 10 hours later, the machine is painted and polished, everything is loose and oiled. The last coat of paint just went on it's home made wood table today. Tomorrow I start aligning pulleys and tables. It cuts OK and I'm sure I can make it better. Why don't you give it a shot and see how it cuts. I find giving new life to old things very satisfying. Also, I think playing with this little guy is a great opportunity to see what I really need in a jointer. If I can't use it, someone will end up with a nice little machine.

Tom
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post #3 of 9 Old 02-29-2008, 07:09 PM
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You could see if you might be able to find the manual for it from Sears. You might be surprised how much information you can find from them. Or at least look up the manual online by model #...

If you don't want it, I could certainly use a jointer to clean up and get working...

Interested in my woodworking, workshop and whatnot? See http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, want to see my other interests such as hunting, fishing, off roading, and camping? See http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com
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post #4 of 9 Old 03-01-2008, 10:24 PM
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Just a quick update. I set up the pulleys and fence today. This little guy makes a nice cut. Bud, give it a shot. All you have to loose is a little time. If you examine and clean the machine, you will probably see what does what. I've never used one of these before and it is pretty easy. BTW, I'm in Monmouth county.

Tom
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post #5 of 9 Old 03-02-2008, 06:11 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks , guys .
After cleaning and reassembly (partial ,because while installing the cutterguard return spring it shot across the shop into virtual oblivion . So that problem awaits ...

It seems to make all the right noises . Loud and buzzy .

I seem to have gotten the knives installed at least close to even with the outfeed table (nonadjustable) . I'm wondering if they should be a tad higher to account for any "springback" of the wood fibers . Or is that just over thinking obsessiveness .

The only other thing that concerns me in setting it up is getting the cutters the exact same height as each other . My eyes 'aint what they used to be . What is an acceptable amount of " slop " ?

Is Dressing the spinning/stationary blades with a fine stone a viable option ,or a sure fire way to the e.r. and blunted cutters....

I am unable to find an online manual , but did find out it was made by American machine and tool for sears . More searching is in order .

Hi Tom , I'm in Gloucester county near Rowan U . What used to be Glassboro State . Its funny , all you have to do is donate a truckload of money ...I wonder if the name of the town is next ..
I take the family camping up at High pt. S.P . Still filthy with bears up there ?

Last edited by BudK; 03-02-2008 at 06:15 AM.
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post #6 of 9 Old 03-04-2008, 12:16 AM
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Bud, I live right next to Sandy Hook. High Point is a bit of a haul for both of us. The wildlife in these parts pretty much consist of sea gulls, squirrels and dead deer.

I'm glad you are giving the machine a second chance.

Tom
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post #7 of 9 Old 03-05-2008, 06:40 PM Thread Starter
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Yup ! it's all together , and I found a spring and rebent it to function properly on the guard . Works sweet . A regular mess o matic '.

Damn , near Belmar ! Don't know what I was thinking ...Atlantic Highlands . duh ....
Bud .
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post #8 of 9 Old 03-06-2008, 07:13 AM
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Bud, you said:
<snip> I seem to have gotten the knives installed at least close to even with the outfeed table (nonadjustable) . I'm wondering if they should be a tad higher to account for any "springback" of the wood fibers . Or is that just over thinking obsessiveness .

The only other thing that concerns me in setting it up is getting the cutters the exact same height as each other . My eyes 'aint what they used to be . What is an acceptable amount of " slop " ? <SNIP>

No have your knife edges exactly the same height as your outfeed table. A good trick is to put some large rare earth magnets on a piece of glass and slide this over your outfeed table until it holds the jointer knives tight against the glass. Then tighten up the gibs. Or get yourself a dial indicator with a magnetic base and check the height of the knives.
The wood fibers shouldn't be springing back, they should be cut off by the knives. You aren't rubbing the wood away, you are cutting it.
Jim
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post #9 of 9 Old 03-06-2008, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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Points straight up . Correct ?
Thanks .
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