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post #1 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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Equal cuts

Just started building things and I love it. Have an Hitachi miter saw and a universal saw table. Looking to learn how to cut several lengths of wood to the EXACT same size. When I use the stop on the table there is still slight play. Any suggestions for this novice?
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post #2 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 07:12 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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the universal saw "stand"?

Meaning a generic saw stand on which your Hitachi is mounted? Without knowing what it's designed like, the stops and all, hard to give any real useful advice. A photo would be helpful!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 07:21 PM Thread Starter
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It is a Ryobi saw stand from Home Depot, cost about $70. Made a planter box today and when it was all assembled certain cuts were just a little off and it bothered me. I tried to square it up but still didn't get it quite right.
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post #4 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 08:33 PM
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If you are cutting thinner stock, such as 3/4" or so, cut the 1st piece 1/4" or so longer than needed. Place it on top of the next piece and make sure the left ends are exactly even (assuming the stock is to the left of the blade). Clamp if necessary. Now make your cut through both pieces. They will be exactly the same length.

If cutting multiples, use one for a pattern, place it on top of the next piece to be cut, then make the left ends even. Now slide the stack up to the blade so the pattern just touches the blade, and cut the lower one.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #5 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 10:04 PM
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If you are using a stop you need to make sure that sawdust is not trapped between the end of the material and the stop, either have the stop situated above the table top or a bevel on the bottom corner of it to give the sawdust that gets pushed by the end of the board an escape route.

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post #6 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 10:26 PM Thread Starter
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thanks for the help
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post #7 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 11:10 PM
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I rarely use a stop, it just seems like one additional thing to tinker with and potentially cause a mistake. The way I was taught was start your cut a little past the actual mark, say 3/16" or so. Make tiny cuts just deep enough to see where the blade's penetrating, while simultaneously sliding the workpiece to the right ever so slightly -- less than a 32nd per adjustment -- gradually working your way toward your line until you're right there. If in doubt stop and take a second to compare to the piece you're matching, then repeat as necessary. It sounds like a tedious process, but with a little practice becomes almost like one fluid motion. I am more accurate this way than when I eyeball, meticulously position and reposition my piece, and almost never overshoot my mark. Don't know if there's a name for this technique but it's the way the guys I work with do it. I too am new to fine woodwork so I'm not sure if it's just a carpenter technique frowned upon by fine woodworkers, but it works for me.
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post #8 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 11:19 PM
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A well set stop is the most accurate way to get repeated consistent results.
It has to be immobile, clamped or screwed down, whatever it takes.
When you bump the workpiece into the blade there can be inconsistencies.
Sometimes you will hit a higher tooth, or miss the teeth altogether and hit the flat part of the blade which is thinner.
If i am doing a quite a few I will kerf the bottom, or clamp something under it so there is a space for sawdust to go.
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post #9 of 12 Old 03-29-2016, 11:22 PM
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also, I know most of those Hitachi CMS's have lasers. While great saws I would not recommend relying on the laser. I've yet to use one by any brand that accurately accounted for blade width. You might know and consciously factor in that the laser line projects a tiny bit to the right or left of the actual cut, depending on calibration. But it's still tough repeating cuts with any real consistency that way.
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post #10 of 12 Old 03-30-2016, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bzguy View Post
A well set stop is the most accurate way to get repeated consistent results.
It has to be immobile, clamped or screwed down, whatever it takes.
When you bump the workpiece into the blade there can be inconsistencies.
Sometimes you will hit a higher tooth, or miss the teeth altogether and hit the flat part of the blade which is thinner.
If i am doing a quite a few I will kerf the bottom, or clamp something under it so there is a space for sawdust to go.
Good point, but if you bring the blade down so that the bottom tooth is just about touching the stock to be cut, and just lightly touch the already cut piece against the blade, it will touch up against multiple teeth, and be quite accurate. It is tough to ge a reliable stop block on longer pieces on most CMSs unless it's in a dedicated bench.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #11 of 12 Old 03-31-2016, 01:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchymist View Post
Good point, but if you bring the blade down so that the bottom tooth is just about touching the stock to be cut, and just lightly touch the already cut piece against the blade, it will touch up against multiple teeth, and be quite accurate. It is tough to ge a reliable stop block on longer pieces on most CMSs unless it's in a dedicated bench.
You are right, but working here in Belize I frequently have to build cabinets in the field, necessity is the mother of invention.
I clamp or screw everything down solid, the saw to the plywood temp bench, the stop to it, etc.
I am used to saw blades now, that tooth thing is a rookie mistake.
When I want to cut a smidge off of something for dead on accuracy, I will lower the miter saw blade and butt piece up to the flat part, then the slightly wider teeth take just a few thousand's off at a time.
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post #12 of 12 Old 03-31-2016, 10:13 PM
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If you are making multiple parts a stop is the most accurate way to go, for a one or two off I use the method suggested to work my way over to the line, and cut more than one part at a time particularly if I want matching pairs.
The only problem with a line is deciding if you want it left on, cut off or split down the middle.

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