Differences in torque/power between corded and cordless? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 08:30 AM Thread Starter
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Differences in torque/power between corded and cordless?

Hey. I apologize if this has already been discussed -- but, if so, could you please direct me to the conversation?

My question is this; what is the difference in torque between corded and cordless drills?

It seems like the cordless drills have a higher max torque than corded drills on average. In fact, most of the corded drills seem to have a relatively low max torque rating (Under 40 nm.), and I don't think I've come across one with a 135nm (Milwaukee cordless 18v), or 136nm (Hitachi cordless 18v) rating. But, I thought the general consensus was that corded drills are significantly stronger?

So, what's the deal here? Can the cordless batteries nowadays easily supply more power than a regular power outlet, and with a, what I assume, much smaller motor in the drill?

Or are the torque ratings meaningless?
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 08:59 AM
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That question cannot be answered in general. You have to ask about specific products as there is a wide variation between products.

George
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 09:54 AM
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It's been my experience corded drills have more power and torque.
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post #4 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 10:22 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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what's the application?

I have 18 V battery drills... 3 speed Dewalt that will really twist your wrist.... and 1/2" corded drills that will do that and worse...
The drill I use depends on what I am going to drill and how many holes and how large. Torque is a factor of RPM and the power or current draw of the motor. Battery drills make a surprising amount of torque on a fresh battery. Newer drills with greater voltage are coming on the market all the time. A while back 18 V Ni Cad was the industry standard, now it's 20 V Li Ion and moving up.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/FLEXVOLT-...9BAD21148FFFE1

There is no substitute for a battery powered drill in some situations like overhead and ladder work. I rarely use a corded drill any longer and have a drawer full of them.

For cabinet building and installations I would always reach for my battery drills and I keep a bunch of fully charged batteries on hand so there is no down time waiting for another charged battery.

It all depends on your application....?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-19-2016 at 10:25 AM.
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post #5 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 12:12 PM
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Are the torque ratings meaningless?

If they are like Horse Power rating pretty much so, they will give you a basis for comparison but such numbers may be manipulated to make the tool look good on paper.

I have both corded and cordless drills and find the newer L-ion powered cordless in the 18 volt and up range to be more than adequate and quite capable of breaking a wrist or pulling you off the top of a ladder if you are reaching out.

I don't know why it is but I have found for drilling 3/8" + holes in steel the best hand drill I have is my air drill.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #6 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
That question cannot be answered in general. You have to ask about specific products as there is a wide variation between products.

George
Thank you for the replies, everyone.

I'm comparing the stated nm (Newton meters - the "metric" unit of torque, I suppose.), which is used on various kinds of manufacturers' drills.

This page lists all kinds of drills in Nm http://www.verkter.no/Skrutrekkere-b...-skrutrekkere/

It's a Norwegian page, but the Nm is listed right in the preview for a lot of them. I think it's

I just noticed this, but it seems that my confusion was caused by how most sites list drills and screwdrivers together (Assuming "screwdriver" is a term for high RPM, low torque rotary hand tools.), with no further distinctions -- for example, that page lists "electrical screwdrivers", but also "drills", or high torque rotary handtools.

PS: I have very little experience with tools, but I've been curious about how these torque ratings work.

Last edited by jac_solar; 08-19-2016 at 12:29 PM.
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post #7 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 01:20 PM
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Since all the drills, both cordless and corded come in a variety of sizes and battery sizes, you will need to compare two tools side by side for a true comparison.
I own 3 sizes of portable corded drills. I have a large 1/2" corded drill with an auxiliary handle on the side to control the torque. It will almost twist your arm off.
The cordless impact tools have much more torque than a drill and many use their impact for as a drill. Of course there are corded impacts with still more power.
I personally feel the corded tools are more powerful in every way. When maximum torque is needed on a cordless tool (using large hole saw for the sample), it pulls the battery life down fast.
I use cordless for convenience.
My favorite cordless is a cordless screwdriver.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #8 of 9 Old 08-19-2016, 01:30 PM
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they are 3 different tools

Battery powered screwdrivers are low RPM low torque devices used to spin smaller screws for electrical installation applications:
https://www.amazon.com/Decker-AS6NG-...y+screwdrivers

Battery drill/drivers have larger batteries, more torque and are usually variable speed:
https://www.amazon.com/BLACK-DECKER-...+drill+drivers

Battery powered impact drivers are usually single speed, hex chuck only, and drive or remove screws with a hammering type impact. These have replaced drill drivers for a lot of deck builders and carpenter since they are so much more efficient in driving screws under tough condition and in PT lumber:
https://www.amazon.com/PORTER-CABLE-...impact+drivers

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-23-2016, 07:53 AM
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Cordless drills have more than enough torque for woodworking. Torque ratings become important when drilling into concrete or steel, but if you have a lot of concrete work to do you want to use corded hammer anyway. Cordless hammer drill may be practical for channel raceway installations and stuff like that but for heavy concrete jobs there is no replacement for corded (hammer) drill. This may help https://www.drillselect.com/
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