DeWalt 735 vs 734 planer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 06-08-2018, 08:57 PM Thread Starter
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DeWalt 735 vs 734 planer

What are the option differences in these two planers? I am starting to look for a good planer for years of solid use. My first project will start with planing 2"thick hickory at 8-10"wide.

Obviously I would love to have a stand alone unit but cannot spend quite that much yet. Any advice on other models? I did a search and see many are happy with their DeWalt's.




On another note I did watch some helpful videos on planing cupped and twisted boards to true them up. I am very excited to get started soon on this project. When I first signed up here I had some hickory from our property milled up and they have been drying in my garage since. @ 8% moisture left.



What planer's are out there to take a good look at? Thanks

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post #2 of 24 Old 06-08-2018, 09:26 PM
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I have the 735, and for the money its a great machine. You gotta watch out for snipe on those small planers though. Either get a in feed and out feed table to go with it or practice holding those long boards at the right height. I was playing around with the 734 in the store and it felt like a toy... Id go with the 735 if I were you.


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post #3 of 24 Old 06-08-2018, 10:20 PM
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Here is a way to get to get snipe out of your DW735. It might work on other planers but I have only used this method on my DW735. Just take your time and follow these instructions to the letter.

http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/planer_setup.pdf
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post #4 of 24 Old 06-08-2018, 10:36 PM
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I had the 733 for 20 years until the motor quit last year and then upgraded to the 735. The 733 is pretty close to the 734 but if it's in your budget I'd get the 735. Two feed speeds and very smooth in operation. The lock is automatic on the 735, too. I got the one with the infeed/outfeed tables and extra blades. HD had it online with free delivery (only took two days) for less than you could buy the planer by itself without the tables and extra blades in the store.

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post #5 of 24 Old 06-08-2018, 11:08 PM
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I vote for DW735 too. I bought mine used. It works great. I held out for a DW735 until I found the right one.
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post #6 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 01:46 AM
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A planer was on my 'someday wish-list' because of budget limitations but a few weeks ago Ebay, then Amazon had the DW735X (with the extra blades and extension tables included) for $450. After a conference with my CFO (and loving wife), I placed my Amazon order and busted our budget to snag the good price. The next day Amazon's price was back up to $599 and the Ebay listing was sold out, so luckily I was able to be in the right place at the right time. I had seen many great comments and good reviews on the DW735 and although my experience with it thus far is limited, I will concur that it is an awesome planer and am glad to have it in my shop.

It looks like the DW735X is listed at $549 at Lowe's until 6/14/2018 which is a fair price, and additionally if you are a veteran the 10% discount drops the price to $494.

While the DW734 seems like a good machine, the DW735 has the edge on overall mass (12 lbs more), cut capability (though only 1/2" more), automatic carriage lock, the fan assisted chip ejection is quite powerful and a nice feature, and the ability to choose between two speeds is a huge plus to adapt between general planing at a faster speed or a slower and more fine finish. While the DW735 is a benchtop planer, it is quite heavy to move about so a stand-alone cabinet (with or w/out casters) can be an idea worth considering.

Keep in mind that for truing cupped or twisted boards, a trip through a jointer is often the first step to get a straight surface and a square edge, then the planer to get second parallel surface and then the table saw to finalize the S4S board. There are methods to get the first straight surface via the planer alone, but it is not something I have experience with, though it can be an option without a jointer.

Interestingly, shortly after purchasing my planer, an 8" Grizzly G0490 Parallelogram Bed Jointer in great condition popped up on Facebook Marketplace for $800 and after a short conversation and a one hour drive (each way), I picked it up for $750 - further busting our budget (loving wifey / CFO put a hold on any future purchases for a while).

I am in a similar circumstance in wanting to mill up wide boards (though in my case, they are from a former one-room schoolhouse in which I am dismantling and reclaiming the wood). My plan is to first mill one side to the 8" max on my jointer, then use a jig on the DW735 to get one side smooth, then complete the process by planing the jointed side. Instead of trying to describe it, Jay Bates created a video of the process that I am planning to use and perhaps it can be of use by you. (Note: Jay has another video that preceded the link below that he references and it can be helpful to view it too.)

Enjoy your milled hickory. Do you have any particular projects in mind?

Art
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post #7 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BattleRidge View Post
A planer was on my 'someday wish-list' because of budget limitations but a few weeks ago Ebay, then Amazon had the DW735X (with the extra blades and extension tables included) for $450. After a conference with my CFO (and loving wife), I placed my Amazon order and busted our budget to snag the good price. The next day Amazon's price was back up to $599 and the Ebay listing was sold out, so luckily I was able to be in the right place at the right time. I had seen many great comments and good reviews on the DW735 and although my experience with it thus far is limited, I will concur that it is an awesome planer and am glad to have it in my shop.

It looks like the DW735X is listed at $549 at Lowe's until 6/14/2018 which is a fair price, and additionally if you are a veteran the 10% discount drops the price to $494.

While the DW734 seems like a good machine, the DW735 has the edge on overall mass (12 lbs more), cut capability (though only 1/2" more), automatic carriage lock, the fan assisted chip ejection is quite powerful and a nice feature, and the ability to choose between two speeds is a huge plus to adapt between general planing at a faster speed or a slower and more fine finish. While the DW735 is a benchtop planer, it is quite heavy to move about so a stand-alone cabinet (with or w/out casters) can be an idea worth considering.

Keep in mind that for truing cupped or twisted boards, a trip through a jointer is often the first step to get a straight surface and a square edge, then the planer to get second parallel surface and then the table saw to finalize the S4S board. There are methods to get the first straight surface via the planer alone, but it is not something I have experience with, though it can be an option without a jointer.

Interestingly, shortly after purchasing my planer, an 8" Grizzly G0490 Parallelogram Bed Jointer in great condition popped up on Facebook Marketplace for $800 and after a short conversation and a one hour drive (each way), I picked it up for $750 - further busting our budget (loving wifey / CFO put a hold on any future purchases for a while).

I am in a similar circumstance in wanting to mill up wide boards (though in my case, they are from a former one-room schoolhouse in which I am dismantling and reclaiming the wood). My plan is to first mill one side to the 8" max on my jointer, then use a jig on the DW735 to get one side smooth, then complete the process by planing the jointed side. Instead of trying to describe it, Jay Bates created a video of the process that I am planning to use and perhaps it can be of use by you. (Note: Jay has another video that preceded the link below that he references and it can be helpful to view it too.)
FOLLOW UP/BETTER WAY: Jointing Stock Wider Than Your Jointer - 219 - YouTube

Enjoy your milled hickory. Do you have any particular projects in mind?
What a wife, you better hold on to her. There aren't too many of the good ones left.

I don't understand how Jay can flatten the board unless the bottom is already flat. Since I put a spiral cutter in my DW735 I do what he is doing but in my case, it's to help with a little snipe. I had all my snipe out using the setup I posted earlier in this conversion.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #8 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 10:30 AM
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What a wife, you better hold on to her. There aren't too many of the good ones left.

I don't understand how Jay can flatten the board unless the bottom is already flat. Since I put a spiral cutter in my DW735 I do what he is doing but in my case, it's to help with a little snipe. I had all my snipe out using the setup I posted earlier in this conversion.

She has been quite supportive and we are in pretty good sync together on most all things we do, so it makes for a quite pleasant atmosphere.

Basically Jay flattens an 8" wide section on the jointer, then places that section face down on the flat piece of melamine in the planer to get the opposite side flat. The board is then flat and smooth except for the section that didn't fit through the jointer which he then addresses by removing the melamine and running the jointed side of the board up through the planer to get rid of the unmilled section. A final pass to plane the entire surface finishes it.

With the warm weather, I have been active with outdoor projects (I live in the middle of my 103 acre tree farm) so haven't had the opportunity to fully utilize the jointer and planer in all aspects, but it seems like Jay's method has good potential.

My original preference would have been to have a helix head planer/jointer combo, but at a cost of $3,500 and up, it wasn't in the foreseeable future. A helix for the planer (and eventually the jointer) is on the want list, but with the extra set of planer blades, I should be in good enough shape for a while. Since having the separate planer and jointer though, the convenience of being able to go back and forth between the two and more spontaneously put the equipment to use seems to be working well in my situation, and the longer parallelogram bed on the jointer is nice to have. My eventual plan is to purchase a portable sawmill to make use of the trees that occasionally fall here and mill them into boards for drying and use. My CFO is fine with it, but the budget won't be there for a while.

Art
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post #9 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 11:54 AM
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DW735 all the way. The best 13" planer out there. Lots of other planers will get the job done. The 735 will put a grin on your face while your at it too.
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post #10 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 01:21 PM
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post #11 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 02:10 PM
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We've been using the 734 in my shop for about 3 years now, and have encountered few issues. The feed rollers must be kept clean and the blades must be kept sharp (i.e. rotated/replaced when necessary). The elevation mechanism isn't the most robust and ours has a few rough spots where the crank gets difficult to turn with any precision. That and the infamous snipe issue because of the way the in/outfeed tables are mounted are the only problems we've had with hundreds of board feet of oak, hemlock, doug fir, cedar, and poplar.


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post #12 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 04:07 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your help. I think I will be looking into the 735 model now that I see the reply's. It always pays to ask the ones with experience.

In case anyone could is interested in the video for planing cupped and twisted boards, I found this worth the watch. The planing starts at 3:10.
Hope someone else can use these tips about the shims!









Quote:
Originally Posted by BattleRidge View Post

Enjoy your milled hickory. Do you have any particular projects in mind?


BattleRidge my first major project will be turning a Hickory tree into a island bar top. I cut two trees down about 3 years ago and here are the finally dried 2" boards.--->









I will also make a few nice cutting boards with the leftover stock.




Last year I cut down two Maple trees and had them milled for a future furniture making process.--->

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post #13 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 04:11 PM Thread Starter
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My video embed did not work?? I can never get those to work right.




That is the link to it.

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post #14 of 24 Old 06-09-2018, 04:24 PM Thread Starter
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This is the look my wife is wanting with white base cabinets. We will see how it turns out.







.

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post #15 of 24 Old 06-10-2018, 08:07 AM
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I got the 734. It works great but I wish I would've gotten the 735. A big advantage of the 735 is the blower to clear the chips. I'm just a hobbyist. I don't have a dedicated shop so my planing gets done outside. I have run my air compressor (or hook up a shop vac) to keep the work clean. Many others say the 735 negates the need for any kind of dust collection. I have mine mounted to the DeWalt rolling stand for portability.

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post #16 of 24 Old 06-10-2018, 10:01 AM
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My DW735 is on a cart with rolling casters. I wheel it outside when I use it.

Despite working outside, I still use dust collection with the DW735. I have seen a lot of warnings that a shop vac cannot keep up with the DW735. I tested it with a cyclone connected to my old 1980 Craftsman 16 gallon shop vac and it works well, although I can't explain why. I wonder whether the DW735 is blowing the dust and chips into the cyclone, rather than the shop vac actually sucking it out. Either way, to my pleasant surprise, it keeps up. Perhaps it is because I haven't tried a really deep cut on a 13 inch wide board. In general, I make multiple shallow cuts, flipping the board often, and I don't run extra wide boards through it very often.

One problem I encountered is that the 2 1/2 inch output of the DW735 is too small for my dust collection hose. My hose won't plug into the DW735 as you would expect. Instead, it butts into the output port on the DW735. They are exactly the same size. I bought an adapter. I put the rubber/hose clamp side on the DW735, so now I can insert my regular shop vac hoses when I use the DW735. Here is the adapter:

http://www.rockler.com/2-1-2-to-2-1-4-conversion-port

If you want to test your own DW735 dust collection setup with a shop vac, the danger to watch out for is dust and chips clogging the hose and blocking the output. It is very possible and likely to happen. Reminder: DeWalt says NOT to use a shop vac with the DW735. I was lucky - my system seems to work.
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post #17 of 24 Old 06-10-2018, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
My DW735 is on a cart with rolling casters. I wheel it outside when I use it.

Despite working outside, I still use dust collection with the DW735. I have seen a lot of warnings that a shop vac cannot keep up with the DW735. I tested it with a cyclone connected to my old 1980 Craftsman 16 gallon shop vac and it works well, although I can't explain why. I wonder whether the DW735 is blowing the dust and chips into the cyclone, rather than the shop vac actually sucking it out. Either way, to my pleasant surprise, it keeps up. Perhaps it is because I haven't tried a really deep cut on a 13 inch wide board. In general, I make multiple shallow cuts, flipping the board often, and I don't run extra wide boards through it very often.

One problem I encountered is that the 2 1/2 inch output of the DW735 is too small for my dust collection hose. My hose won't plug into the DW735 as you would expect. Instead, it butts into the output port on the DW735. They are exactly the same size. I bought an adapter. I put the rubber/hose clamp side on the DW735, so now I can insert my regular shop vac hoses when I use the DW735. Here is the adapter:

http://www.rockler.com/2-1-2-to-2-1-4-conversion-port

If you want to test your own DW735 dust collection setup with a shop vac, the danger to watch out for is dust and chips clogging the hose and blocking the output. It is very possible and likely to happen. Reminder: DeWalt says NOT to use a shop vac with the DW735. I was lucky - my system seems to work.
I've seen quite a few guys just running the hose from the 735 right into a trash can. I hear the blower is that powerful.

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post #18 of 24 Old 06-10-2018, 11:46 AM
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I've seen quite a few guys just running the hose from the 735 right into a trash can. I hear the blower is that powerful.
I heard that too. I never tried it, because I think it would blow a lot of unhealthy sawdust from the trash can into the air. Even if you wear a dust mask and work outside as I do, it doesn't make sense from a long-term health perspective to increase the dust load in the air around your work area.

The goal is to capture the sawdust before it can get into the air. I would prefer a quality dust collection system, but will make do with what I have for now.
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post #19 of 24 Old 06-10-2018, 12:06 PM
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I heard that too. I never tried it, because I think it would blow a lot of unhealthy sawdust from the trash can into the air. Even if you wear a dust mask and work outside as I do, it doesn't make sense from a long-term health perspective to increase the dust load in the air around your work area.

The goal is to capture the sawdust before it can get into the air. I would prefer a quality dust collection system, but will make do with what I have for now.
I agree. I do know if I ever have the need to do more planing, I'll move up to a more professional machine and good collection system. These small machines are good for limited use but certainly not for high production.

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post #20 of 24 Old 06-10-2018, 02:34 PM Thread Starter
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I heard that too. I never tried it, because I think it would blow a lot of unhealthy sawdust from the trash can into the air. Even if you wear a dust mask and work outside as I do, it doesn't make sense from a long-term health perspective to increase the dust load in the air around your work area.

The goal is to capture the sawdust before it can get into the air. I would prefer a quality dust collection system, but will make do with what I have for now.
Couldn't you use a lid on the can and drill a hole for the hose? Maybe tape the lid seam. Surely someone has made a DIY collection system here.

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