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-   -   Damaged Jointer I might buy. (https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/damaged-jointer-i-might-buy-212427/)

Scott410 05-05-2019 03:15 PM

Damaged Jointer I might buy.
 
Alright guys, I'm in the market for a jointer. I came across this and talked to the guy selling it, I can get it for $200. I figure a new fence will run me $150-$200. I think $400 isn't to bad total.

Questions:
1. How do you think the fence was damaged and have you seen it happen before.
2. Anything else that I should look for since this is damaged?
3. Should I move on.

Thanks for the help guys.



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Steve Neul 05-05-2019 03:23 PM

2 Attachment(s)
There is no telling how the fence got broke. It might have happened when the jointer fell out of the truck.

If it's only the fence that is bad and you are handy you might be able to improvise a fence. I have a craftsman jointer and the fence on it is as good as new but I made a homemade fence so I can depend on it staying 90 degrees to the table. I keep the factory fence just in case I try to sell the jointer some day.

Scott410 05-05-2019 03:23 PM

Edited, I forgot the pics.

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Scott410 05-05-2019 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Neul (Post 2053775)
There is no telling how the fence got broke. It might have happened when the jointer fell out of the truck.



If it's only the fence that is bad and you are handy you might be able to improvise a fence. I have a craftsman jointer and the fence on it is as good as new but I made a homemade fence so I can depend on it staying 90 degrees to the table. I keep the factory fence just in case I try to sell the jointer some day.

I hope it didn't fall out of a truck.[emoji1787] I might have to make my own fence.

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Steve Neul 05-05-2019 03:27 PM

That break is something a welder could maybe braze together. Difficult to say without removing the fence and seeing if you can get to the back side without interfering with the tilt mechanism.

shoot summ 05-05-2019 04:06 PM

Around here if you are patient you could find that jointer for $250 intact and in great shape...

Scott410 05-05-2019 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shoot summ (Post 2053793)
Around here if you are patient you could find that jointer for $250 intact and in great shape...

I found one, I was working out of town and it was gone before I got home.

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FrankC 05-05-2019 04:45 PM

Sometimes the most expensive item you can buy is the one going for cheap that just needs a couple parts to get it up and running. If you can do the repairs yourself it may be worth taking a chance, often there is more money in parting out machinery than selling them complete.

woodnthings 05-05-2019 04:55 PM

It's pretty much useless without a working fence ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott410 (Post 2053779)
I hope it didn't fall out of a truck.[emoji1787] I might have to make my own fence.

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Don'y even think about that option!


Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Neul (Post 2053781)
That break is something a welder could maybe braze together. Difficult to say without removing the fence and seeing if you can get to the back side without interfering with the tilt mechanism.


As someone who has brazed cast iron, I can say that a clean break like what I see in the photo can absolutely be brazed together.
About an hour of shop time should be all it takes for a machine shop repair.



Based on the non-working condition.... offer $100.00 in cash or walk away.:vs_cool:

NoThankyou 05-05-2019 05:04 PM

I had that model jointer. IMHO, $200 seems a bit high for one in good working order. Knowing how Delta charges $8 or more for a UniSaw arbor nut, the cost of a replacement fence could be much more than you want to pay if the fence is still available.

Lincoln, the welding company, says welding cast iron is difficult but not impossible. The problem with welding is that you're going to have to machine the face of the fence. More $$$

I think that if you can get the jointer for close to nothing, you could try about 4 tubes of super glue gel to hold the fence together. In theory, the fence should slide together nicely along the break. Some wax paper under the fence, a very liberal amount glue and some clamping pressure overnight. You may need some acetone to clean up any squeeze out.

BTW - As was noted earlier, "fell out of a pick up truck". That possibility scares me because things could be bent to the point of no alignment possible.

Scott410 05-05-2019 05:28 PM

Thanks for the advice so far guys, I appreciate it.

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13579 05-05-2019 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Neul (Post 2053775)
There is no telling how the fence got broke. It might have happened when the jointer fell out of the truck.



If it's only the fence that is bad and you are handy you might be able to improvise a fence. I have a craftsman jointer and the fence on it is as good as new but I made a homemade fence so I can depend on it staying 90 degrees to the table. I keep the factory fence just in case I try to sell the jointer some day.

Move on, this project will take hours to fix then refix, cut the potential loss. Tom k

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Tool Agnostic 05-06-2019 10:02 AM

Skip this one and move on. You can find much better for the same money, with far less risk.

Buying a used jointer is enough of a challenge without taking on so many unknowns. The knowns are already bad enough to pass on this one.

FrankC 05-06-2019 03:39 PM

As for welding cast iron, my father used very few cuss words, usually he uttered them just after welding cast iron and hearing that dreaded "ping"

woodnthings 05-06-2019 06:19 PM

welding VS brazing .......
 
There are 3 types of welding you can use on cast iron in addition to brazing. If you are curious, watch these videos on You Tube:


https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...zing+cast+iron


I've only done brazing,not welding but in each one the pre heat and post heat helps to prevent the radical temperature swings which may cause cracking. Small hole is drilled at either end of the crack to prevent the crack from extending. In the case of a clean separation like on a broken part, the piece must be supported and leveled out as close as possible to original OR there will be machining involved IF it was a machined surface originally. There would be machining involved on the broken fence, probably surface grinding, not only to smooth the weld, but to straighten out any warping that the welding caused.



I don't know if the CA glue process Rich recommeded would work in this case, but it may be a first step before welding and would be easier and cheaper, IF we haven't thrown cold water on the purchase by now...... :|

Steve Neul 05-06-2019 09:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankC (Post 2053927)
As for welding cast iron, my father used very few cuss words, usually he uttered them just after welding cast iron and hearing that dreaded "ping"

The cuss words should have stopped the ping sound. More often than not cast has such inferior metals in it that it resists welding.

Steve Neul 05-06-2019 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodnthings (Post 2053947)
There are 3 types of welding you can use on cast iron in addition to brazing. If you are curious, watch these videos on You Tube:


https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...zing+cast+iron


I've only done brazing,not welding but in each one the pre heat and post heat helps to prevent the radical temperature swings which may cause cracking. Small hole is drilled at either end of the crack to prevent the crack from extending. In the case of a clean separation like on a broken part, the piece must be supported and leveled out as close as possible to original OR there will be machining involved IF it was a machined surface originally. There would be machining involved on the broken fence, probably surface grinding, not only to smooth the weld, but to straighten out any warping that the welding caused.



I don't know if the CA glue process Rich recommeded would work in this case, but it may be a first step before welding and would be easier and cheaper, IF we haven't thrown cold water on the purchase by now...... :|

I don't have a torch to try brazing. I've only done nickel welding on cast. I find it fickled. Some cast will weld easily where others just burn up. I found a small crack in the exhaust manifold on my jeep and decided to weld it. The longer I worked on it the bigger the hole got. I finally fixed it by buying a new manifold.

hawkeye10 05-07-2019 06:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott410 (Post 2053771)
Alright guys, I'm in the market for a jointer. I came across this and talked to the guy selling it, I can get it for $200. I figure a new fence will run me $150-$200. I think $400 isn't to bad total.

Questions:
1. How do you think the fence was damaged and have you seen it happen before.
2. Anything else that I should look for since this is damaged?
3. Should I move on.

Thanks for the help guys.



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Hey Scott, you could have the fence welded. The weld on cast iron isn't as strong as welding steel but you don't need a lot of strength. Take it to a professional and tell them to make it straight and weld it on the back. They used to weld cast iron at work pretty often.

Mycrossover 05-07-2019 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodnthings (Post 2053947)
There are 3 types of welding you can use on cast iron in addition to brazing. If you are curious, watch these videos on You Tube:


https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...zing+cast+iron


I've only done brazing,not welding but in each one the pre heat and post heat helps to prevent the radical temperature swings which may cause cracking. Small hole is drilled at either end of the crack to prevent the crack from extending. In the case of a clean separation like on a broken part, the piece must be supported and leveled out as close as possible to original OR there will be machining involved IF it was a machined surface originally. There would be machining involved on the broken fence, probably surface grinding, not only to smooth the weld, but to straighten out any warping that the welding caused.



I don't know if the CA glue process Rich recommeded would work in this case, but it may be a first step before welding and would be easier and cheaper, IF we haven't thrown cold water on the purchase by now...... :|

I thought he must be kidding to suggest CA. CA is akin to acrylic plastic when cured. Hardly my first choice for big cast iron pieces. It is not for big structural repairs Try JB Weld with a steel plate on the back to splint it. They fix engine blocks with that stuff. I had a broken cast part on my jointer. Welding failed. Stuff I saw on ebay often had broken in the same place and was stuck back together. Then I lucked out and found that later versions of the part had been improved to take rhe stress off where it was breaking and found a clean one on ebay.

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Scott410 05-09-2019 11:41 PM

Thanks guys, I appreciate all the comments and advice. I decided that I did want to pursue it anymore, to many unknowns and didn't want to waste my money. Instead I bought this gem, wish I could've gotten it a little cheaper, but I think I did good. I couldn't find one near me and this one popped up in a city I was working in, so I jumped.https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/201...47492903b1.jpg

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