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post #1 of 13 Old 10-07-2016, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
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Craftsman Jointer question

I just bought this Craftsman jointer made by King-Seeley Corp. and it runs nicely but the blades are knicked and I can't figure out how to remove them. There is a wedge shaped bar in front of each blade that is held in with two cap screws. After removing the screws, the knife and bar are just as secure as they were with the screws in place. I don't want to beat on anything so I'm stuck. There are also some screws under the knives that seem to set the height but they don't loosen the knives from their position at all. Any help would be appreciated.
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post #2 of 13 Old 10-07-2016, 02:45 PM
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Chances are the old blades will need to be punched out after many years of being secured in place.
Soak each blade well with some type of penetrate to help loosen before you use the punch.
You will be punching low, the edges will not be damaged.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #3 of 13 Old 10-07-2016, 04:24 PM
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rotate the cutter head ...

You can get underneath the wedge bar with a small tipped screw driver by rotating the cutter head around to the top. This is what I did when I had one of those older jointers. They came right out with a sharp tap on the end of the screw driver. No need to punch anywhere on the side of the blades or the wedge bar.

See the gap under the bar in this photo?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-07-2016 at 04:29 PM.
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post #4 of 13 Old 10-07-2016, 05:40 PM
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Yea, pry the wedge up with a screwdriver. Once the wedge moves a little all of it will fall out. That's the easy part. Putting the knives back in is when it gets hard. Since the rear table isn't adjustable the knives will have to be installed perfectly level with the rear table. On mine you can get the knives perfect and when you tighten them in they raise up a little so it's something that takes a lot of tinkering.
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post #5 of 13 Old 10-07-2016, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Ishee View Post
I just bought this Craftsman jointer made by King-Seeley Corp. and it runs nicely but the blades are knicked and I can't figure out how to remove them. There is a wedge shaped bar in front of each blade that is held in with two cap screws. After removing the screws, the knife and bar are just as secure as they were with the screws in place. I don't want to beat on anything so I'm stuck. There are also some screws under the knives that seem to set the height but they don't loosen the knives from their position at all. Any help would be appreciated.


On all my blades the screws are turned down so they push the wedge up, wedging the blades in place. I always need to tap the wedge down to remove my blades. I have a designated scrap of wood the thickness of the wedge and about 10 inches long that I use and give it a firm wack a mallet.
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post #6 of 13 Old 10-08-2016, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
You can get underneath the wedge bar with a small tipped screw driver by rotating the cutter head around to the top. This is what I did when I had one of those older jointers. They came right out with a sharp tap on the end of the screw driver. No need to punch anywhere on the side of the blades or the wedge bar.

See the gap under the bar in this photo?
A sharp tap with a screwdriver is a punch.
A punch is a sharp tap. You might Save your screwdriver tip if you use a punch for a punch.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #7 of 13 Old 10-08-2016, 04:42 PM
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The Craftsman manual that came with my Craftsman jointer specifies that the blades shoud be one paper thickness ABOVE the table. not even.
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post #8 of 13 Old 10-08-2016, 06:21 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies. I haven't been able to pry the wedge bar out yet. I'll add a picture that might help.
GeorgeC you are probably correct because I laid a straight edge on the outfeed table and it lifted a hair when I turned the spindle.
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post #9 of 13 Old 10-08-2016, 06:32 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Try this...

If you can't get any tool under it, try hitting it sideways or parallel with the slot. That will loosen it enough to lift it up. A straight edge will get you very close. That aluminum bar in my photo is what I like to use because it doesn't tip over when you let go of it, unlike a straight edge. It's approximately like using a paper thickness under the bar, because it will just skim across the bar moving it about 1/16" ahead.

I've done it that way many times and the results are just fine. Nothing like a new or sharpened set of blades.... smoooooth.:smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #10 of 13 Old 10-08-2016, 10:03 PM
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Even the manual says just pry up on the wedge to remove the blades.
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post #11 of 13 Old 10-13-2016, 08:15 AM Thread Starter
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After total disassembly of machine, I got the knives out and sharpened. I drilled and tapped jack screw holes in the wedges to get them out easier next time. While putting the infeed and outfeed tables back on, I found it difficult to get them in the same plane so that a straight edge showed them parallel to each other. I got it done but now I'm getting an undercut in the end of my board. It seems wrong but are the two tables not supposed to be parallel? I had to push the limits of the jack screws under the outfeed to get it flat to the infeed. Anyone have knowledge of this?
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post #12 of 13 Old 10-13-2016, 09:24 AM
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parallel or co-planer is good

That condition is called snipe and is usually because the outfeed is higher than the blades at TDC. The outfeed is adjustable on your jointer, so I would just raise it slightly and run a pass. You can check it with a straight edge, but the proof is in the performance.

The blades must also be parallel to the top surface of the outfeed. The blades must also be the same height out of the cutter head. The cutterhead body is your point of reference on a jointer, since it is not adjustable.

This will help you get it right:
http://newwoodworker.com/basic/usejntr.html


Snipe

Snipe nearly always occurs on the jointer at the trailing end of the board. Also, the snipe is confined to an inch or two at the end of the board. Most often this is caused by the outfeed table being lower than the knives when they are at the top of their arc. As the end of the board leaves the infeed table it drops onto the outfeed table, making a deeper cut in that last portion of the board. You will notice that the length of the snipe approximates the distance from the edge of the infeed table to the center of the knives.
The cure is simple - adjust the outfeed table so that its surface is flush with the knives at the top of their arc. Also, make sure that all of the knives are at the same height. Knife height alone is not likely to cause snipe but it is not uncommon to find miss-adjusted knives when the outfeed table was set wrong. Take the time to check!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-13-2016 at 09:53 AM.
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post #13 of 13 Old 10-15-2016, 08:07 AM Thread Starter
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Well, I broke out the dial indicator and set these knives to the same height as the outfeed and the cut was beautiful! Thanks everyone for your responses and ideas. I'm glad I found this forum and will be spending quite a bit of time here.
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