Corded vs Battery sander - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
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Corded vs Battery sander

Is there any reason that a battery sander would be a poor choice for working with? I have yet to buy a quality palm sander and with some of the sale pricing going on right now I may finally go buy one.
Iím looking at the DeWalt sander and wonder if anyone has any negative response to a chargeable sander. Does the battery die down quick?
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post #2 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 11:59 AM
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Iím probably in the minority but I can only see the utility of a cordless sander on a job site where dragging cords and with potentially a small number of outlets.
In a shop Iíd go corded.
Just my two cents.


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post #3 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 12:01 PM
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my kids got me a milwaukee m18 ros for my birthday
it is a good sander, but i've only used it briefly, it won't last for hours like the corded sander
i wouldn't buy one as your only ros (unless you have a lot of batteries)
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post #4 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 12:25 PM
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My take...

I suppose your environment would matter. If you're in a remote site, where power can be hard to find, then battery tools. Just remember to keep multiple batteries, and keep them charged. Companies make money from their batteries; once a manufacturer decides it's time for you to "upgrade" to their next tool, they just stop making batteries for your model. So, limited overall lifespan of the tool ... 5-10 years if you're lucky?

If power is convenient, then I'd go powered. My Dewalt sander will probably last me the rest of my life. I've seen shops that have retractable extension cords in the ceilings. Just plug your tools in and go. There's also the benefit of holding the power cords away from your work.
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post #5 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 01:14 PM
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Even if your sander is cordless, what is your dust collector plugged into?
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post #6 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 02:14 PM
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Most tools are better corded unless you work away from an electrical supply. A drill is fine because you'll often work outside, but for most shop-based tools, get corded. It's cheaper, they're more powerful and more reliable.
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post #7 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 05:22 PM
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Most tools are better corded unless you work away from an electrical supply. A drill is fine because you'll often work outside, but for most shop-based tools, get corded. It's cheaper, they're more powerful and more reliable.
I agree. Besides, how often are you going to spend half an hour at a time drilling? Cordless drills make sense most of the time. I wouldn't buy a cordless sander unless I needed it away from an outlet (which for me would be never) or if I only needed it for quick touch-up sanding and it takes the same batteries I already own.
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post #8 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 05:53 PM
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Whats not to like? Cordless anything has to be given a look. It is on my list of upcoming purchases along with the battery powered router. I expect it will be up to Dewalts standard of quality. I expect it will be just like any other battery powered tool. When the power runs out you change the battery.
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post #9 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 06:25 PM
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Cordless power supplies (aka batteries) are quite decent nowadays. That said, as mentioned, no reason to oust yourself on the inconvenience of a dead battery mid job.

https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-Random-...NsaWNrPXRydWU=


If you're not spending festool money, you're hard pressed to find a better sander than this.
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post #10 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 08:25 PM
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Any corded tool WILL run out of charge 5 minutes before you finish what youre working on, thats just a fact. Might only happen once in your life, but it will happen, and on a project that has to be done right now.

Go with the corded to start with. If you end up needing a cordless sander, itll be something you know you need.
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post #11 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 08:34 PM
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One thing to be certain, every corded tool you own will unplug during use. Every corded tool you own will sweep a counter or bench some time in its service life and drop something important onto a floor that will damage or break it or a box of hundreds of something will end up all over hell and gone.
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post #12 of 35 Old 11-29-2019, 08:55 PM Thread Starter
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Well thank you all for the advice. I already thought the corded sander was a smarter choice for me but you all helped confirm that.
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post #13 of 35 Old 12-05-2019, 09:15 PM
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I am an old furniture designer builder, turned remodeler and have many favorite corded shop tools - I have Rockwell/Delta corded sanders of every type. I use my corded tools in my shop, as well as my 18V Ryobi tools. I also use Ryobi 18V for everything from blowing leaves to sawing trees and everything in between. I switched years ago from Milwaukee 18V tools when a battery replacement cost as much as a Ryobi skill saw, drill, and sawzall plus a battery and charger. Over the years I have collected all Ryobi tools starting with the blue line to the now flourescent green line. My blue line drills still work, and I have at least ten 18V batteries dispersed around my house and shop. i love the freedom of battery power, and Ryobi has improved their products and batteries over the years. The Ryobi 18V oscillating hand sander is amazing at how easily it cuts and is so smooth in my hand. I had Makita corded oscillating sander that I tossed because its vibrations hurt my hand and gave terrible swirls to my projects. I have my original 4x4 palm Rockwell sander that I can use for hours at a time with little hand fatigue, but more and more I pull out my Ryobi 18V unless I am sanding a 4'X6' table top. I do a lot of edge curves which require lots of hand movements. Cords often get in the way. As do vacuum hoses. Either type - corded or battery will work for you. Batteries are affordable now so a few extras sitting around will allow you to keep working for hours at a time with any battery tool. All the major tool companies now have many 18V tools, but Ryobi still leads the field with so many good tools. I almost always use my Ryobi 18V sabre saw instead of my corded Bosch(which I love) because it's easy to grab and go and cuts just as well. Test drive any corded sander you buy for ease of use and hand fatigue if you can. Hope this is not too late
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post #14 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 12:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subroc View Post
Whats not to like? Cordless anything has to be given a look. It is on my list of upcoming purchases along with the battery powered router. I expect it will be up to Dewalts standard of quality. I expect it will be just like any other battery powered tool. When the power runs out you change the battery.
And when that battery runs out?

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post #15 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 05:58 AM
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And when that battery runs out?
You put another battery in and charge the one that dies. I believe that is the same 15 year old argument used against any battery powered tool. If your work flow requires more than 2 batteries you buy more. Today's battery powered tools are powerful and pretty battery efficient. I don't own that particular sander. It is in my cart on Amazon. I do however own 20+ battery powered tools and another 20+ batteries to go with them.. I just picked up the Dewalt battery powered trim router, arrived yesterday. I would be hard pressed to purchase a corded tool these days when a cordless is available at a similar price.


BTW, I don't really care what anyone else does. I am not trying to convince you or the OP or anyone else that battery powered is the way to go. Just presenting my own logic on the subject.
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post #16 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 08:07 AM
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battery powered tools are great - when and where battery powered tools should be used. they add weight AND a limited power source. the corder counterpart will generally have more power, and run until you drop it....
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post #17 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 08:32 AM
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battery powered tools are great - when and where battery powered tools should be used. they add weight AND a limited power source. the corder counterpart will generally have more power, and run until you drop it....

Your corded/cordless weight point is a valid one. Your more power argument is not. The mere presence of a cord does not, by itself, indicate any more power. Today's top battery powered tools are plenty powerful. Entry level stuff, maybe not so much but the entry level corded stuff is suspect as well.
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post #18 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 09:19 AM
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Your corded/cordless weight point is a valid one. Your more power argument is not. The mere presence of a cord does not, by itself, indicate any more power. Today's top battery powered tools are plenty powerful. Entry level stuff, maybe not so much but the entry level corded stuff is suspect as well.
i have performed residential/commercial contracting for many years, and in my opinion, battery powered tools have yet to meet the power of corder tools in the professional grade (but the arrival of lithioum batteries has greatly improved their case). hobby grade tools don't last long in the trade.

yes, a high end battery tool will outpower a cheap corded tool - ill give you that.
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post #19 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 10:11 AM
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i have performed residential/commercial contracting for many years, and in my opinion, battery powered tools have yet to meet the power of corder tools in the professional grade (but the arrival of lithioum batteries has greatly improved their case). hobby grade tools don't last long in the trade.

yes, a high end battery tool will outpower a cheap corded tool - ill give you that.

Well, I accept your expertise and experience at face value. Not calling that into question. While I may be a hobby woodworker/carpenter/DIYer, I spent much of my adult life (prior to retirement) as a mechanic (auto, heavy equipment, small engine and nuclear submarine (mostly nuclear power and weapons systems). So, I have handled a tool or two over the years. I am incredibly impressed with the advancement in battery powered tools. I expect you are right, the lithium batteries is an important step. The brushless motors seem to be an important advancement as well.

Where that line is, if it is a line at all, between what you characterize as professional grade and hobby grade always seems blurred to me depending on who you ask. I expect every job site you have ever been on has had guys using Makita, Dewalt, Milwaukee tools in all the trades. Some would call them all hobby grade.
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post #20 of 35 Old 12-06-2019, 02:00 PM
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I have a Ryobi cordless ROS, and it does a good job. Battery life is fine, except for really big jobs, like a table top or similar. However, it takes less than a minute to change the battery. The secret is to keep a charged battery ready. The dust collection works well, and the tool has decent power.
I also have a Dewalt corded ROS. It runs a little faster than the Ryobi, but does not have as efficient dust collection.
Personally, I prefer the Ryobi. I never have to worry about the cord catching on something or being too short. I find I am changing over to cordless tools more and more. I have talked with several contractors using Dewalt cordless table saws on jobsites, and they are very happy with the power and battery life.
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