Circular wood-saw to cut tile? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
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Circular wood-saw to cut tile?

So far I have not added a circular saw to my collection (yet). The time has come, and I am wondering if I can do two tasks with one saw?

I was thinking on going to Home Depot and picking up a Ryobi. This would be primarily for wood cutting of course, but I also have a demo project in my washroom and need to cut down some old tile and mud (old house).

I am confused if I can swap out the standard wood-cutting blade, and just throw on a dry-diamond blade in order to cut through the tiles/mud. Or is this a definite no-no, and those blades should only be put on circular saws specifically designed for tile-cutting only?

Thanks in advance, I can't seem to find a definite answer on this.
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post #2 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 10:47 AM
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It is IMO an "OK" idea, but a safer demo method to remove "some old tile and mud" would be to consider using an adjustable sawzall unit, which (may be) lighter in weight and give more accurate cuts. Be safe.
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post #3 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 11:02 AM
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I have used my circular saw to cut concrete, bricks, tile and about anything else you can think of. Just have to have the appropriate blade installed.

George

PS Oh yes, it also cuts wood.
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post #4 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the response, so it wasn't a terrible stupid thing to think.

I was thinking on picking up a blade like this:

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.4...000729374.html

And then just putting it on a typical Ryobi. As long as they are both 5/8" arbor, everything should be fine?

I think that's a decent blade to use, designed for DRY cutting. But my last question, is the 4-3/8" blade ok on a circular saw that normally comes with a 7.25" saw blade?

A smaller blade should be ok as one can adjust the base?

Again, I know I'm sounding like a total newbie here (and I am).
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post #5 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 11:41 AM
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It will work, I prefer to use an angle grinder.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #6 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 12:16 PM
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The only thing I would be concerned about is the dust getting back inside the motor and wearing the brushes and armature out quicker, maybe use some kind of filter to keep that dust out.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
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post #7 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
The only thing I would be concerned about is the dust getting back inside the motor and wearing the brushes and armature out quicker, maybe use some kind of filter to keep that dust out.


Agree with BigJim, bad idea for the motor.
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post #8 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 12:45 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Stick to wood cutting!

I burned out a nice Skil saw cutting marble with an abrasive blade years ago. Masonry dust will kill your saw.

Home Depot will rent you the tile saw for "peanuts". They sold a water cooled tile saw for$50.00 on sale a while back, so I got one and use it for sawing concrete. It's only a 4" or 5" blade, but enough to make a nice deep score to break it.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-06-2017 at 12:48 PM.
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post #9 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 03:10 PM
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Don't try and reinvent the wheel, you'll wreck the circular saw and like others have stated, the dust will be unbelievable. If you're just trying to get up the tile on the floor, a sledge hammer works fine. Once you loosen up a section, just keep hitting around it and it will come up without too much trouble. Safety glasses, dust mask.
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post #10 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 04:56 PM
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The answer is ....NO, NO, NO !!!!!! they're not made or designed the same....the blades will interchange BUT destroy the internals of the saw....

I'm really surprised the professional people on here even suggested the idea of doing it...come on guys act like a professional not some wood hacker.

Contractor, tileman, electrician, plumber, finisher, drywaller, welder, fabricator ...... I can and do all the trades BUT very few tools cross over effectively...I have to seperate my trades and tools. I have most of the tools BUT sometimes it's still efficient to rent for a small odd job....especially tile...the dust can destroy...yes it CAN be done, I'm not arguing that....just not professional NOR WISE!!!

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post #11 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 05:15 PM
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Demo -

perhaps you should elaborate on what you are doing before people lose their minds....

if you need to cut a clean line to install 'something new/different' that's one thing.
if you're just demo'ing an old tile wall, that's a different thing.

sawing will create lots of dust - unavoidable in the 'need clean cut line' situation.
a wide flat flooring chisel and mallet will demo tile right quick; bit of practice and most of the mud will come off on the tile.
of course, if you don't need the wall (board/plaster/lath) behind, ye' olde' Sledge is highly effective.
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post #12 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 07:19 PM
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I wonder why my 30+ years old circular saw has not been ruined???? How many of you, other than Wood, have ever used a circular saw for this type of application?

Now if you tried to cut these dusty materials for a lot of hours it may be a problem. But for one job now and then I see no problem, nor have I ever had a problem. When you get through with the job use your air compressor to blow out the motor.

If you are trying to remove tile from a wall or a floor (if you have an air compressor) the best was is with an air hammer/chisel. They are cheap and cheap is all you need. My last one is from Lowes. The biggest problem I had on the last job was the noise. It is loud in an enclosed bathroom.

George
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post #13 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 09:46 PM
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A tile saw runs with the bottom of the blade in water to lubricate the cut. Not only will it create a lot of dust for the motor it will dull the diamond blade quickly without the water. For someone not doing it on a daily basis Harbor Freight sells a cheap tile saw that works pretty good. I've used one for years but I may only do a tile job once a year.
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post #14 of 15 Old 05-06-2017, 10:58 PM
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I stand partially wrong...I misread ...forgive me.

I misread the OP as I thought he was buying a Ryobi table saw as most tile saws are table style. I stand partially incorrect as to he asked re a circular saw and I replied re a table saw. DEFINITELY not use in them.

Demo....YES you can use a dry cut tile blade in some circular saws BUT check with mfg reccomendations. I forgot I have a diamond blade in a circular saw to cut/score light concrete and rock board BUT YOU MUST wear good respirator and seal up the room tightly.....DEFINITELY turn off HVAC or it will make havoc on units if drawn into them. I found demoing tile out is usually best with a chipping/demolition hammer LESS mess BUT not messless I have several BUT they can be rented via most rental stores.

Sorry for the wrong info given by me .....reading in a hurry, kinda like not reading the instructions, my bad.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
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post #15 of 15 Old 05-07-2017, 12:46 AM
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Hi Demolition,

Yes...in short...you can do what you are asking. It isn't (as you can tell from other posters) recommended. Yet it is done even at the professional level in ceramics and stone work. Such saws are looked at as "throw aways" and you go with the least expensive saw that will cut straight.

The better option, and not that much more expensive, is to employ a 4.5" angle grinder with a diamond blade. This is the smallest size grinder, and a standard tool often used in our stone carving and ceramic work for shaping, carving and cutting stone and other hard materials...

Good luck,

j
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