Circular Blade Terminology - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 Old 09-15-2012, 02:11 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
Circular Blade Terminology

Today I visited Precision Sharpening here in Albuquerque to drop off some kitchen knives for Mom.

While I was there I asked them for a price list on my way out.

I have several 10" carbide blades I bought cheap or scrounged over the years and several that I've purchased new that have lost their edge.

After getting the price list home and looking it over I saw a lot of terminology that is new to me.

I want to have a good understanding of these terms while deciding the cost effectiveness of having my blades sharpened as opposed to replacing them.

Here are my questions. Hopefully many others here will also be interested in the answers.

1. What does "facing" a carbide blade mean and when is it necessary?

Does this mean dressing up the forward portion of the carbide tip?

2. What does "topping" a carbide blade mean and when is it necessary?

Does this mean dressing up the top of the carbide tip?

3. What is a "complete side grind" and when is it necessary?

Does this mean grinding both sides of the carbide tip?

4. What does it mean to "repair broken shoulders"?

Where are the shoulders on a circular blade?

5. What does it mean to "re-gullet" a blade?

I have several steel blades as well.

I've always assumed that steel blades are inferior to carbide and that once dull they should be tossed.

Prices on the list include those for steel blades so apparently my assumption is wrong.

6. When is it advantageous to use a steel blade?

Thanks guys. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

It's after midnight and I've got to turn in but I'll log on tomorrow.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did — in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 09-15-2012, 07:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,446
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jharris2 View Post
Today I visited Precision Sharpening here in Albuquerque to drop off some kitchen knives for Mom.

While I was there I asked them for a price list on my way out.

I have several 10" carbide blades I bought cheap or scrounged over the years and several that I've purchased new that have lost their edge.

After getting the price list home and looking it over I saw a lot of terminology that is new to me.

I want to have a good understanding of these terms while deciding the cost effectiveness of having my blades sharpened as opposed to replacing them.

Here are my questions. Hopefully many others here will also be interested in the answers.

1. What does "facing" a carbide blade mean and when is it necessary?

Does this mean dressing up the forward portion of the carbide tip?

2. What does "topping" a carbide blade mean and when is it necessary?

Does this mean dressing up the top of the carbide tip?

3. What is a "complete side grind" and when is it necessary?

Does this mean grinding both sides of the carbide tip?

4. What does it mean to "repair broken shoulders"?

Where are the shoulders on a circular blade?

5. What does it mean to "re-gullet" a blade?

I have several steel blades as well.

I've always assumed that steel blades are inferior to carbide and that once dull they should be tossed.

Prices on the list include those for steel blades so apparently my assumption is wrong.

6. When is it advantageous to use a steel blade?

Thanks guys. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

It's after midnight and I've got to turn in but I'll log on tomorrow.
These are questions best answered by a sharpener, which I am not, but I'll try.

1 & 2: Most sharpening involves just grinding the front edge of the carbide (face). Top grinding is touched up as necessary.

3: Regrinding the sides is less common because it changes the overhang of the carbide and all the side clearances and angles, which are very important to how a blade performs. It's also more difficult to do correctly.

4: The shoulder is the part of the steel body that supports the carbide tooth. Occasionally they get broken and need to be repaired.

5: The gullet is the deep space between the teeth and shoulders. It's purpose is to remove the chips from the saw kerf. Blades with large gullets, like rip blades, can remove the chips very efficiently. I can only guess that regulleting means to grind the gullet deeper to compensate for heavily ground carbide teeth that have been greatly reduced in size from many top grind resharpenings.

6. I don't use steel blades, as overall they're just not as practical. They don't stay sharp very long, but steel can be sharpened to a finer edge than carbide. You can try "facing" steel blades with a file, but I wouldn't bother to have on sharpened professionally. Inversely, I would not recommend trying to touch up carbide blades on your own.

I would also not bother to have cheaply made blades resharpened at all. The carbide will be sharper, but the quality of the steel, the carbide, the brazing, the overall design, etc., will still be poor, and the blade will likely have high runout, poor performance, and will dull faster. Make some clocks with them! I do recommend having high quality carbide blades resharpened by a competent professional....Scott Whiting in Glendale AZ is highly recommended.



Circular Blade Terminology-shoulder.jpg

Common types of grinds:
Name:  Saw-Tooth-Config.jpg
Views: 4990
Size:  22.0 KB

Last edited by knotscott; 09-15-2012 at 11:40 AM.
knotscott is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to knotscott For This Useful Post:
woodnthings (09-15-2012)
post #3 of 6 Old 09-15-2012, 08:25 AM
Senior Member
 
Dave Paine's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 7,222
View Dave Paine's Photo Album My Photos
A very thorough reply by Knotscott.

+1 on only sharpening the carbide blades. Steel blades are inexpensive and better to replace, they can also warp from overheating.

I am surprised at the ala carte sharpening costs.

If the teeth were re-ground on the side, as Knotscott mentioned, this changes the side clearance, and the blade may not perform as well. It may cut, but it may build up more heat, and in woods like cherry this would burn easily.

I have only used Forrest and Ridge Carbide to sharpen my carbide blades.

The provide a list of the cost to sharpen the blade, and the only additional costs are if they have to replace a tooth.

I had a tooth which was slightly chipped, and they were able to remove the chip with the sharpening, so they did not replace.

http://www.forrestblades.com/sharpprice.htm

http://ridgecarbidetool.com/sharpening/

I have used both companies to sharpen their blades. They are both good and the blade will come back and cut like new.
Dave Paine is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 Old 09-15-2012, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks very much guys.

I found this article this morning. Your responses helped me fill in the blanks.

http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_bas...Selection.html

I also went through my carbide blades and after considering their original quality and current condition decided to invest in high quality blades as I need them and can afford them.

Thanks again!

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did — in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 09-15-2012, 03:07 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,446
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
You're welcome. Here's more info about picking saw blades that may interest you.
knotscott is offline  
post #6 of 6 Old 09-16-2012, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks man.

That's exactly what I've been looking for.

Jeff

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did — in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Misaligned circular saw blade Raptor22 Power Tools & Machinery 7 08-06-2012 11:07 AM
Circular saw blade Stilts General Woodworking Discussion 5 03-14-2012 01:42 AM
circular saw blade shatter? wiz561 Shop Safety 18 02-26-2012 09:00 AM
Circular saw blade for 1/2" PVC? Paul01 Power Tools & Machinery 5 07-05-2011 04:56 PM
Circular saw blade on 10" TS toycrafter Power Tools & Machinery 6 06-14-2010 02:24 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome