Can power tools remain in good condition stored in a trailer? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 37 Old 12-17-2015, 12:58 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Planeguy View Post
Wax on, wax off.
Wax on, wax off.

I do keep most of my tools in a detached garage that has no heat/cooling but I do have a dehumidifier running 24/7 all summer here in the GA humidity. It's not Houston humidity (what is?) but it's pretty humid. Before I got the dehumidifier I did have a small rust problem, but not anymore.

As an aside, I had a really bad rust problem out there until a guy noticed I stored pool chemicals there. Never crossed my mind. When I moved those out a huge amount of the rust issue went with it.

Have you considered Damp-Rid? That's a relatively inexpensive solution that's helped me in a couple of places where moisture is a problem. And nowdays they make much bigger tubs of the stuff that you wouldn't have to change that often. Might help.
I will have to look into Damp-Rid! Thanks!

Jim G
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post #22 of 37 Old 12-17-2015, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by JimGnitecki View Post
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Of course I am still wondering if all this planning, all these compromises, and all this work are worth getting back into woodworking, but the attractions are multiple: relatively low cost hobby, allows me to be creative, reproduces what my Dad did,and I really, really enjoy it, so that's why I am continuing to consider doing it again despite the obvious obstacles.

Jim G


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If you are going into this as a hobby why not work within the limitations of your situation, perhaps you should consider changing the design of the items produced to conform to the type of tools that are practical.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #23 of 37 Old 12-17-2015, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
If you are going into this as a hobby why not work within the limitations of your situation, perhaps you should consider changing the design of the items produced to conform to the type of tools that are practical.
That IS a suggestion worth my contemplating.

Jim G
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post #24 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 04:18 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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ant ideas here?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvWYkzuNssM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpofHnTgWvs

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-18-2015 at 04:27 AM.
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post #25 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 12:19 PM
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I didn't read the other posts, but have a bit of advice to offer from experience.

I've stored tools including my DW735 and a Griz jointer with cast iron beds in my cargo trailer for months over all 4 seasons. I did little prep, just waxed the jointer beds and sprayed it down with Boeshield. I also stored wet, green pressure treated lumber in this trailer with the tools, so humidity was bad. Overall, there was a bit of surface rust on the cast iron that came off easily with an abrasive pad and some WD40.

My trailer has a vent in the roof, with a vent cover over it. It stays open all the time. The cover keeps rain out, but allows air exchange.
This is what the cover looks like:


It's a pretty cheap upgrade and we find (I work at a dealership that sells cargo trailers) that trailers with vents last longer than those without. We sell damprid, too, but I wouldn't bother with any desiccant if you have a vent.

If you have a vent already, it'll set you back all of $20 & it's an easy DIY install. If you need put one in, it becomes a bit more complicated as you'll probably need to add some roof support, cut a hole in the roof and seal it all up. Still do-able as a DIY for many.

Good luck!
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post #26 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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Fantastic, WoodnThings! These each gave me really good ideas, especially the first one (by Paulk).

For my purposes, I need room for only 5 space consuming pieces of compact equipment:

SawStop Jobsite saw
31.75” W x 28.75” D x 15.5” H w/o cart (The cart takes too much space)
8.2 cu ft
79 lb

DeWalt DW735X planer
22" x 24.25" x 18”h (unclear which dimension is width & which is depth)
5.6 cu ft
92 lb

Steel City Model # 20130VS Benchtop drill press
10”w x 16”d x 30”h
2.8 cu ft
108 lb

Rockwell RK7866 Belt Disc Sander 4.3 amp, 4x36 belt, 6” disc
10.6”w x21.75”d x 12.6”h
1.7 cu ft
45 lb

Arbor press - 1.5 ton for sufficient vertical capacity. No specs yet, but small.

Obviously, the SawStop is the biggest space consumer. Its 31.75” Width x 28.75” Depth means that the storage shelf or floor space reserved for the equipment must be at least 28.75" deep.

Total machines wt = 324 lb plus whatever the arbor press will weigh, which is still well within the trailer's unused net carrying capacity.

Total volume = 64”w x 29”d x 31.5”h with saw & sander “stacked” with sander on shelf over saw, since the sander is light weight. This is not too bad.

Here is my trailer (combination Harley garage / toyhauler / RV) as it stands now:



Placed in a line along the driver side wall, the woodworking equipment weight would nicely balance the Harley-Davidson, eliminating the current curbside weight skew, which is currently unavoidable because the Harley weighs more than anything else in the trailer.

And, yes, that is a full kitchen at the front of the trailer, with:
Coffeemaker
Induction cooktop
Microwave that accepts even an 11" dinner plate
Stainless steel portable "sink" (sold as a warming cart insert for restaurant buffet)
3 cu ft refrigerator freezer (under counter, behind sliding diamond plate doors)

There is a full set of cooking equipment & supplies in the upper cupboard.

The lower cabinet also holds 120 volt loadcenter, 25' shorepower cord, 12 volt converter, power washer, supplies, etc.

On the driver side wall, you can see the folded up "murphy bed" which swings down on a piano hinge, and is supported by the 2 folded legs you can see in the photo.

The lighting is fantastic: 4 LED ceiling fixtures that draw only a couple of amps TOTAL at 12 volts, and light up the trailer at night like a Christmas tree: (photo taken before the kitchen cabinetry etc was done)



The 2 videos are being really helpful! Note that the Paulk trailer is not even insulated ( see the uninsulated roof and rafters at minute 15 or so in the video), and apparently this is not a problem. My trailer is even fully insulated.

My current plan under consideration is to house the 5 pieces in the trailer, but use them, one at a time, OUTSIDE the trailer, possibly standing on the (leveled via rear portable supports) ramp, which has a weight capacity of over a ton. This would keep the sawdust outside the trailer on the grass, where the wind will quickly dispose of it, eliminating the need for a dust control system. The tool in use would be placed on a folding portable stand sized to accept any of the 5 tools. The Harley would obviously be rolled out for the session, to enable moving around inside the trailer and moving the machines in and out.

Lots to consider and plan . . .

Jim G

Last edited by JimGnitecki; 12-18-2015 at 12:37 PM.
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post #27 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 12:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDIY View Post
I didn't read the other posts, but have a bit of advice to offer from experience.

I've stored tools including my DW735 and a Griz jointer with cast iron beds in my cargo trailer for months over all 4 seasons. I did little prep, just waxed the jointer beds and sprayed it down with Boeshield. I also stored wet, green pressure treated lumber in this trailer with the tools, so humidity was bad. Overall, there was a bit of surface rust on the cast iron that came off easily with an abrasive pad and some WD40.

My trailer has a vent in the roof, with a vent cover over it. It stays open all the time. The cover keeps rain out, but allows air exchange.
This is what the cover looks like:


It's a pretty cheap upgrade and we find (I work at a dealership that sells cargo trailers) that trailers with vents last longer than those without. We sell damprid, too, but I wouldn't bother with any desiccant if you have a vent.

If you have a vent already, it'll set you back all of $20 & it's an easy DIY install. If you need put one in, it becomes a bit more complicated as you'll probably need to add some roof support, cut a hole in the roof and seal it all up. Still do-able as a DIY for many.

Good luck!
My trailer has 2 directionally variable wall vents, one high on driver side front, and one low on curb side rear, plus a 15" x 30" sliding glass window. I leave one vent fully open, and the window cracked open, for ongoing ventilation.

I also had the trailer factory custom built with a roughed in air conditioning frame in the roof (you might see it in the photo), also with roughed in 12 gauge wiring to it, which I connected to a 20 amp circuit breaker in the loadcenter. I don't have the air conditioner bought or installed yet, but a ready for it. It will obviously only be used when the trailer is being used as an RV.

The shorepower cord connects to a 2000 watt Honda generator that resides fulltime in the covered bed of my pickup truck, along with a pancake air compressor that is large enough to fill up bus tires. Once the shorepower cord is attached to the generartor, the trailer is fully powered, and there are multiple GFCI outlets.

Jim G
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post #28 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 12:39 PM Thread Starter
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Here's a photo of the bed deployed:



The stainless steel gate latch visible above the bed secures it to the wall when it is folded up.

Jim G

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post #29 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 01:59 PM
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Nice trailer. Is it a Work n' Play from Forest River?
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post #30 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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Nice trailer. Is it a Work n' Play from Forest River?
No, it started life last April as a brand new cargo trailer that I ordered from Lark Trailers through a dealer. I spec'd it very carefully to meet my size, weight, capacity, and features requirements as I planned right from the start for it to act as a garage for my Harley, a toyhauler for my Harley (and also at the time a KTM dirt bike), and a "simple" RV (basically a place to get shelter, sleep, cook, and safely store the bike, when "camping").

My plan was to buy a basic "shell cargo trailer" and then add what I wanted to make it suit my needs.

It started out with NOTHING in the interior, except I ordered the walls insulated from the factory (The ceiling and ceiling insulation I added myself after delivery).

I published a complete thread on an HD forum while designing and building it:

http://www.hdforums.com/forum/genera...adventure.html

It was a GREAT investment.

It's pretty slick looking on the exterior. Here's a couple of photos:





The shine patterns visible on the concrete are from all the polished aluminum on the trailer!
Jim G

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post #31 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:05 PM
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Very cool!

Would you mind me asking approximately how much the total cost has been so far? (not including your man-hours, of course :)
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post #32 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:13 PM
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You may be aware, but your EU2000 is not quite enough juice to run a roof top air. Definitely not a standard 13.5K btu. Some custom order an 11k btu and say it works, but you're peak draw is still 2500 watts on those. We have lots of customers run 2 EU2000s with a parallel kit for 4k watts. That's enough juice to run about anything.

Either way, you've got one hell of a nice setup. It's a damn fine looking trailer inside & out.
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post #33 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
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Very cool!

Would you mind me asking approximately how much the total cost has been so far? (not including your man-hours, of course :)
About $7000 with everything I added, without including any cost for my (huge) manhours, and before I pay for the air conditioner and install, BUT I also got the base trailer at a last minute discount of $800, because the factory made 2 errors building it:

- They put in only one window instead of two that I ordered (one on each side was the intent, for crossflow ventilation when any breeze was available)

- They placed the one window they did install at too low a height from the floor, so it required me to make special provisions for hauling the very tall dirt bike, so that the handlebar did not hit the window frame

The factory really, really did not want to build me a new correct trailer, so we negotiated an $800 discount for me to take it as built.

Jim G

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post #34 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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You may be aware, but your EU2000 is not quite enough juice to run a roof top air. Definitely not a standard 13.5K btu. Some custom order an 11k btu and say it works, but you're peak draw is still 2500 watts on those. We have lots of customers run 2 EU2000s with a parallel kit for 4k watts. That's enough juice to run about anything.

Either way, you've got one hell of a nice setup. It's a damn fine looking trailer inside & out.
Thanks for the complements.

The Honda generator WILL work for me. Here's why:

I deliberately wanted an AC unit that would run on the Honda 2000, as I like the size and weight of the Honda and did not want anything larger and heavier, as that would be impossible to lift into and to fit into the bed of the pickup truck.

There are several factory RV rooftop air conditioning units that are specially built to run with lower startup and running currents than a "normal" AC unit. You don't see them advertised in the RV ads, becaue they cost more than the normal ones, because they use better more efficient designs and components to achieve the lower amp draw. Their normal target market is RV manufacturers who want to install 2 or 3 AC units on an RV and still enable careful 30 amp or 50 amp connectivity via shorepower. But those are also perfect for people like me who want to have a very small generator.

The current low draw AC models I am leaning towards are the Coleman Mach Polar Cub 9200 BTU (9201D series), OR the (Coleman) Airxcel Mach 1 PS 48207 63151 (11,000 BTU, the "PS" means power saver, with just 45.6 Locked Rotor Amps which the Honda apparently accepts with a time delay breaker). Once the AC unit is past its startup, it runs on just 10 amps.

Jim G
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post #35 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:32 PM
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I can tell you from experience that having to pull all of your tools out to use them will be a pain in the neck. All of my tools are on mobile bases or carts so I can reposition them because I am working in a one car garage.

I am retired but doing a lot of woodworking - everything from completely remodeling our kitchen to making some yard art for a friend. My garage is air conditioned/heated via mini split system and only rarely do I use the drive way to work.

Austin gets pretty hot in the summer, huh? Here in Houston also. I got tired of the 100 deg heat in the garage and got it insulated (R38) and the mini split put in. Life is much better now. But I still have to move the big tools around to set up for the next step in building my projects. It can be done, just aggravating some times.

Here are pics of a couple of the biggest projects so far. I hope I don't have to build anything that big again.

Good luck.
Mike
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post #36 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:47 PM Thread Starter
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I can tell you from experience that having to pull all of your tools out to use them will be a pain in the neck. All of my tools are on mobile bases or carts so I can reposition them because I am working in a one car garage.

I am retired but doing a lot of woodworking - everything from completely remodeling our kitchen to making some yard art for a friend. My garage is air conditioned/heated via mini split system and only rarely do I use the drive way to work.

Austin gets pretty hot in the summer, huh? Here in Houston also. I got tired of the 100 deg heat in the garage and got it insulated (R38) and the mini split put in. Life is much better now. But I still have to move the big tools around to set up for the next step in building my projects. It can be done, just aggravating some times.

Here are pics of a couple of the biggest projects so far. I hope I don't have to build anything that big again.

Good luck.
Mike
Nice work! My products are all tiny (largest piece would be maybe 12" long, maybe a few inches wide, and 1 or 2 inches thick), and I have a need for only the 5 tools mentioned above, th heaviest of which is 92 lb. And, if my most current calculations are right, only the saw will actually have to be carried. The planer can be positioned so that the infeed wood runs PAST the very narrow drill press, sander, and arbor press, into the planer, and then out the rear of the trailer, and all the wood chips it produces will be vigorously ejected out of the trailer! Even if I have to move more pieces (say because it is too hot or cold to work outside the trailer), my work sessions would generally be short enough that I only use one machine per session.

This all may seem very crowded to many of you, but my wife and I are fans of relatively tiny houses (we live in a 399 sq foot cabin that qualifies technically as an RV), and we move a lot (over 20 home addresses in the past 40 years), as we like to experience new things. I consider solving the space problem for woodworking as just another fun technical problem to overcome.

I do wish the saw was a bit smaller, but I really, really want that saw stopping safety feature, and if the SawStop Jobsite saw is the smallest saw that gives me that feature, I'll figure out how to make it work.

p.s. The entire trailer, as equipped, including even the yet-to-come AC unit, and with all 5 machines in it will still weigh under 3500 lb! The interior square footage, including the shallow v-nose into which the kitchen cabinetry is built, is 70 sq ft!

Jim G

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post #37 of 37 Old 12-18-2015, 03:52 PM
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I learn something new everyday! I didn't know they still made a sub 10k btu unit. The old 8000s had a lot of problems and I know they quit making them, but looks like the 9200's are getting good reviews and really low profile, too. I've never seen one on any of the many brands of RVs that we sell, but it looks like it should work really well for your trailer. Price really isn't all that bad, either.

FWIW, I've actually seen a Honda 2k gen run a 13.5k btu AC in 80' + weather, but low humidity. Shouldn't be able to, but those little Hondas really are great machines.
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