Can an electric hand planer square wood? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 04-12-2019, 06:47 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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OK, how about this ingenious idea....

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgcz75b View Post
The OP asked if an electric hand planer could square wood. It can.
I'm impressed by this guy's ingenuity, and that it works.

This issue I see is it's too short to be useful/accurate on longer lengths. Just try to joint boards on a stationary or bench top jointer with short beds ..... if you haven't already. The most common complaint of bench top jointer users is the beds are too short and I get snipe. At least this "inverted' version would have a better chance on longer lengths:
https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-PL1632-.../dp/B00UVXYU84


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post #22 of 35 Old 04-12-2019, 07:07 PM
Beware of purists
 
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The hand planer as used by the Eric Sorenson on his Youtube channel obviously worked for him and the wood he was joining, but I'll be glad to watch your Youtube channel where you can claim and produce evidence it doesn't work.

"Never attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by stupidity." Hanlon's Razor
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post #23 of 35 Old 04-12-2019, 07:31 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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It worked for him .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
This issue I see is it's too short to be useful/accurate on longer lengths. Just try to joint boards on a stationary or bench top jointer with short beds ..... if you haven't already. The most common complaint of bench top jointer users is the beds are too short and I get snipe. At least this "inverted' version would have a better chance on longer lengths:
https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-PL1632-.../dp/B00UVXYU84


Quote:
Originally Posted by sgcz75b View Post
The hand planer as used by the Eric Sorenson on his Youtube channel obviously worked for him and the wood he was joining, but I'll be glad to watch your Youtube channel where you can claim and produce evidence it doesn't work.

If it worked for him or will work for you that's great! It wouldn't work for me, especially on pieces longer than 12" or so as he demonstrates at this pont in his video:

https://youtu.be/YOROlmd0Zn8?t=462



I don't think proving a negative would be a valuable experience for me. I suggest you build it since you are so fond of it and you tell us how you like it. I have enough experience with full size jointers to know that it wouldn't be useful in my shop. BTW, I own 4 of those hand powered planers and I would rather use my 22" Stanley jointer plane than that gizmo....
A better version here: JMO

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Last edited by woodnthings; 04-12-2019 at 07:41 PM.
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post #24 of 35 Old 04-13-2019, 07:42 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your replies. It seems that an electric planer is too loud, even the 12v Bosch one, I was thinking of using a jigsaw instead of a hand saw (unless the piece is too small to support the saw).

I’ve read that jigsaws are relatively quiet and don’t produce as much sawdust as a circular saw. Do you think that’s true? And secondly, can it cut “straight enough” with a guide so as to not require the use of a shooting board?

Thanks!
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post #25 of 35 Old 04-13-2019, 08:37 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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A jig saw is meant to cut curves .....

The narrow blade in the jig saw allows it to follow a curved line, unlike the large round blade in a circular saw which wants to stay straight.
So, no, a jig saw won't do what you want without considerable planing or sanding afterwards.

I don't know your circumstances, but my advice is to stick with traditional hand tools and especially the Japanese type pull saws and hand planes. The pull saws take advantage of a simple physics principle, "an object put in tension will tend to straighten itself out" ... like a rope, a cable or a steel band. Unlike an English saw blade, which is pushed down into the work and will bend and flex under the pressure. Also the Japanese pull planes are smoother to work with and you can build one your self from a kit OR buy one ready made:

https://www.amazon.com/Daikichi-Japa.../dp/B003EIG856

https://www.fine-tools.com/japaneseplane.html

The pull saws:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=japanese+...l_53p6uaui8r_e
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Last edited by woodnthings; 04-13-2019 at 08:39 AM.
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post #26 of 35 Old 04-13-2019, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yonathan View Post
I’ve read that jigsaws are relatively quiet and don’t produce as much sawdust as a circular saw. Do you think that’s true?
That is true...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yonathan View Post
And secondly, can it cut “straight enough” with a guide so as to not require the use of a shooting board?
Could be (with the very expensive modles) made to work...but...there are much betters saws for this task and most of them are either giant power tool forms...or...they are hand tools.

The hand tool versions (as Woodnthings has rightfully suggested...!!!...) are almost as quick, and in reality (big picture) in the hands of someone that learns to...use them well...they can be almost as quick, or even quicker!!!

I have often been able to resawn a plank or timber in the time it takes someone else to "jig up" there big power tool to make the same cut...

As to type of "hand tools"...I have my bias toward Japanese and other Asian tools, but learning to use the complete concert of hand tools is to your benefit...

For "resaw work" as you need to do, I would recommend a "Kerfing Plane" and a "Frame Saw" dedicated to resawing work....and!...set it up to work with a "pull stroke" configuration as they can be learned to use either way...but the "push stroke" for these is often trickier to get the knack of...

These are easier (in general) to use than there Japanese counter parts for resawing work for most students of the craft...

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
Stephen Covey:"Seek to understand, before seeking to be understood..."
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post #27 of 35 Old 04-13-2019, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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Yes I’m “fast enough” with a Japanese ryoba, however my poor cuts require the heavy of a shooting board, and my hand plane is not square is it’s hard to get it to work well with the shooting board. And once I switch to “normal planing” mode, I have to reset the blade properly. So the idea is to get a better (that is, square) cut in the first place and only use the plane for smoothing.
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post #28 of 35 Old 04-15-2019, 03:53 PM
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As Jay alluded to and others have noted here and there, your time will be better spent tuning up and getting good with what you have in hand, rather than going out and throwing money at new solutions. Why? Because those new tools all have limitations and learning curves, just like the tools you already have and with which you have actual firsthand experience. This is a fine handicraft and as such, there are no shortcuts, no silver bullet, no easy street. It's time to take the time to master your tools and don't get suckered in by the tool manufacturers' slick marketing (they want your $$); this is why we all participate in the craft, it's about the learning and the gradual mastery, and the freedom that comes from that.

The jigsaw idea: By design, these will at best provide you a very rough cut that needs lots of truing up with...a plane!! LOL. The only ones I will consider are the Festool (hold on to your wallet) and the Bosch, which are the ones Festool copied via a ~4-year long collaboration with Bosch. So you will be throwing in another ~$300 minimum to get a quality tool that is not designed to accomplish what you hope to accomplish and still need that plane to become ready for assembly.

Very importantly, jigsaw blades are unsupported, so even though one can cut a nice straight pencil line, that's only at the top surface, and below that pencil line, the blade will bend and flex and wander as it follows the growth rings in the work piece. The end result will be a work piece that needs so much reworking that the wise woodworker will need to layout a daunting waste allowance that is much bigger than the finished size and there's always the possibility that that won't even be good enough and you might have to redesign your finished piece to accommodate the dimensions of the individual components -- that's a path to failure.
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post #29 of 35 Old 04-18-2019, 01:16 PM
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This is my best friend s project.. He is a very famous turkish maker ... you can find plan and dimensions at the end of the video..





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post #30 of 35 Old 04-18-2019, 01:35 PM
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This is my project.. but my electric hand plane is not Bosch...

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post #31 of 35 Old 04-19-2019, 01:32 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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This is my best friend s project.. He is a very famous turkish maker ... you can find plan and dimensions at the end of the video..





Sent from my SM-J700F using Tapatalk
That’s incredible
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post #32 of 35 Old 04-19-2019, 10:32 AM
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I bought and sold a late 1950’s 4” bench-top jointer for $100 via Craigslist. Of course it was cast iron and had the usual inclined plane screw adjustments and performed relatively quietly and definitely smoothly. It was just too, too small for most of my work.

While I appreciate the craft of the vid’s "maker,” I am left wondering why any of us, who have access to other comparable/better options and who want a jointer for producing projects, would even contemplate this.

Remember: 1) Tools perform best when used as designed. 2) Portable hand tools are designed for hand, not bench use. 3) The Bosch power plane is at least $100, or equivalently priced to a proper bench tool. 4) Ask yourself whether toolmaking or woodworking is what you want to spend your time and money on and move in that direction as quickly and efficiently as possible. 5) MOST IMPORTANTLY: Jointers are industrial style tools designed for long production runs, they take time and care for each setup and routine maintenance and do require practice and skill. Hand tools (non-powered) are extremely quick and intuitive to put to use; with practice and simple work aids, they have traditionally produced the same results the OP is chasing.
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post #33 of 35 Old 04-19-2019, 10:43 AM
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Oops, I really exaggerated! Here’s nearly the same benchtop jointer...for $60 and its 6”!

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/tls...867779826.html


— Bradley
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post #34 of 35 Old 04-22-2019, 05:28 AM Thread Starter
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I’d like to thank again to everyone that replied.

I ended up going against the advice given here by getting a jigsaw and I found that, with the right blade and some patience, it cuts square.

I’m also happy with the fact that it’s fairly quiet compared with a circular/table saw, at least on medium speed which is what’s needed for hardwoods. Another benefit over the aforementioned saws is that the sawdust goes directly in front of the saw and not sideways so cleanup is easy, though I hope to find a way to hook my shopvac to it for even better dust management (as it is, the hole
in the saw is too small).

So right now my limitation is with cutting small pieces that cannot hold the saw base, so I have this well-reviewed jig on my wishlist:
https://www.neutechnik-toolshop.com

Also, I’ve made my first cutting board (from a single piece). &#x1f642;
Next one will include different wood species.
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post #35 of 35 Old 04-23-2019, 01:23 AM
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Rock on! And good luck, no matter what, there’s always a learning curve.
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