Both Routers stop working suddenly - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 30 Old 03-15-2016, 11:13 PM Thread Starter
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Both Routers stop working suddenly

I bought a Craftsman router about 4 years ago. Been using it quite a bit but was working fine until last night. I was cutting aluminum with it on the router table (3" dia chamfer bit)...after a few passes the router slowed down and shut off all of a sudden. When I flip the switch all the lights work but the motor doesn't spin (no noise either)

I thought maybe the motor was burned out because it's several years old, so I bought the same router tonight at Sears to try it again.

Several seconds after cutting the aluminum the router pulsated and shut off. I didn't even have it on for a full minute before it shut off. Same as before when I flip the switch all the lights work but the motor doesn't spin.

Bad luck or what???

This is the router http://www.sears.com/craftsman-12-am...2&blockType=G2
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post #2 of 30 Old 03-15-2016, 11:52 PM
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Mounted in a router table, the aluminum pieces will fall down into the motor and mess the motor up. You may be able to take them apart and clean the aluminum dust out of them and see it that helps, hopefully it didn't short something out.

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post #3 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 12:07 AM Thread Starter
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That's what I thought...I took the first router completely apart and didn't see any aluminum inside anywhere...The users manual says it can be used on non-ferrous metals
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post #4 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 04:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronhl View Post
That's what I thought...I took the first router completely apart and didn't see any aluminum inside anywhere...The users manual says it can be used on non-ferrous metals
You probably wouldnt really 'see' it. Any larger chips or shavings large enough to see likely would get caught in the air intake, what would make it through is more dust than anything else. If any of that gets inside itll cause no end of havoc. My guess is that either aluminium either created a short that fried the motor, or that the bearings or motor commutator were fouled by the aluminium

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post #5 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 07:03 AM
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I am reading this in disbelief. You were cutting aluminum (that light weight, soft metal) with a wood working router? Really?

George
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post #6 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 07:46 AM
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I bet it was the aluminum chips too. Since the metal conducts electricity I can see it screwing with the magnetic fields of the motor.
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post #7 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 08:22 AM
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check the power make sure it is good.








my uncle used to swear that craftsman chainsaws are the best chainsaw ever made. he bought a new one every other year.
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post #8 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 09:04 AM
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I also think that aluminum is the culprit.
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post #9 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 09:42 AM Thread Starter
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You guys are probably right,....not what I wanted to hear. I have read many sources online that say it is fine to cut aluminum with a wood router using a carbide bit and the users manual says aluminum is fine. Even if I were to use the router by hand couldn't metal chips get sucked up into the router? Guess I will exchange the router and never cut metal with it again? Now I have to completely redesign my project, been working for months on how to cut this piece of metal and finally found the bit and made a jig to do it.
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post #10 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 10:37 AM
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if the router was adequately performing the job, then you could devise a shield or ???


just make sure the router can cool itself.
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post #11 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 10:52 AM Thread Starter
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The openings are directly under the bit, I could probably close the openings but it wouldn't get enough air. If the metal dust is microscopic I can see how it would find a way to suck it in.

In all of my research I have not found any info about this happening to anyone. I am very surprised it happened on two routers especially because many websites say I can do it
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post #12 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 11:07 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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router cooling ...

Most table routers exhaust air upward, and do not suck it down into the motor. I suspect that the Craftsman motor has a design issue, either the soft start, the variable speed control or housing design that just doesn't work for this application.

Do not give up on your project, just return the newer router for $$ and get a different brand. I use Porter Cable router with great success so maybe that's a choice, AND Sears may offer those also.

I would seriously consider a very powerful shop vac suction located right at the cutter to remove as much aluminum dust as possible.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 11:33 AM
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... Also, reduce the router RPM when working with the 3" dia bit on aluminium.

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post #14 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 01:02 PM
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coming from a Navy Electrician and Mechanical and Electrical Engineer.
i doubt you have a Megger to test the leads on the router motor. that would tell you if there is short (which we all agree there must be)...normally you want to do that on a milling machine not quite a router given the base material of the router bits and speed.
now you can get the right bits and mount it on a top mount drill press and rig a fence to it, that should work better, although, your drill has a thrust bearing (Z force/movement up and down) and the axial bearings are not quite meant for the X-Y movement.
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post #15 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 02:53 PM
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I am betting on the conductive aluminum dust also. In the router table the router is up side down and the dust falls in. Right side up should be less of a problem.

Bob making sawdust in SW Louisiana
with a EX-21
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post #16 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 04:42 PM
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If I cut aluminum with one of my routers, I wrap a old piece of pantyhose around it to filter out any dust.

http://www.diychatroom.com/

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post #17 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 04:54 PM
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Quote:
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If I cut aluminum with one of my routers, I wrap a old piece of pantyhose around it to filter out any dust.
Keeping your old ones for aluminum? :smile3:
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post #18 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 05:41 PM
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this is why ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvman44 View Post
I am betting on the conductive aluminum dust also. In the router table the router is up side down and the dust falls in. Right side up should be less of a problem.
I suggested above that you run a strong shop vac right to the cutter head and leave it running until you are all finished. The router cooling fan will blow upward, and not ingest any dust while it's running, but keep the shop vac on regardless.

Try a different brand of router as some may be more sensitive than others. There are enough routers on CNC milling aluminum than you can count, so it may be specific to your environment, or your router.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #19 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 09:18 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Most table routers exhaust air upward, and do not suck it down into the motor. I suspect that the Craftsman motor has a design issue, either the soft start, the variable speed control or housing design that just doesn't work for this application.

Do not give up on your project, just return the newer router for $$ and get a different brand. I use Porter Cable router with great success so maybe that's a choice, AND Sears may offer those also.

I would seriously consider a very powerful shop vac suction located right at the cutter to remove as much aluminum dust as possible.
The other posters are correct the vents are directly under the bit and the aluminum dust is falling right in, if it blows upwards, that might help but still the vents are directly under the bit

I router does have the soft start feature, why do you think that is an issue?

Good call on the vacuum, I am just really scared of trying to cut the aluminum with any router again because of the bad luck, Im sure some dust will settle

Thanks for the inspiration, I am not one to give up but it sucks because the setup I had was perfect- just another setback but learning all the time
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post #20 of 30 Old 03-16-2016, 09:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Jig_saw View Post
... Also, reduce the router RPM when working with the 3" dia bit on aluminium.
Yup had it on the lowest setting...It is more like 2, 2-1/4" diameter (I over estimated). It's the widest bit I have and was cutting the metal very well until the routers stopped
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