Bosch REAXX Table Saw - Make Your Own Zero Clearance Insert - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 3Likes
  • 1 Post By Tool Agnostic
  • 1 Post By Mad
  • 1 Post By woodnthings
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:46 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Bosch REAXX Table Saw - Make Your Own Zero Clearance Insert

Introduction

The Bosch REAXX jobsite table saw is a wonderful tool, but Bosch zero clearance table inserts (throat plates) are expensive. The Bosch TS1006 Table Saw Zero Clearance or Dado Insert has a list price of $60, and discounts are minimal. Due to litigation with SawStop, Bosch REAXX saws are not currently available for purchase in the US, but they are available elsewhere in the world, and many people in the US own one, including me. A nearly identical zero clearance insert for the nearly identical Bosch 4100-09 table saw costs $6.10 at the big box store. Why does the zero clearance insert for my Bosch REAXX table saw cost nearly $60?

If you don't own a Bosch REAXX saw, stop here. If you want to keep reading, I will share my experience making a zero clearance insert for my Bosch REAXX table saw.

If You Want to Use a Dado Set with Your Bosch REAXX, You Need to Buy an Official $60 Bosch Zero Clearance Insert.
That is because you need a special screw that lets you attach dados that are wider than 1/2 inch to your Bosch REAXX table saw. The only way to get that special screw is to buy the Bosch TS1006 zero clearance insert. The Bosch TS1006 comes in two parts - the zero clearance insert, and that special screw. The special screw goes INSIDE a threaded hole at the end of the arbor, and has a sleeve that holds the wider dado blades in place. See your REAXX user manual for additional details.

If you use multiple blades or different dado widths on your REAXX table saw, then you will probably want a zero clearance insert for each blade and each dado width that you use. When a zero clearance insert is tight against the blade on both sides, then small parts cannot get between the blade and the table insert and jam things up or trigger a kickback.

I spent a lot of time thinking about how the table insert on the REAXX saw is held down on the table saw. There are two tabs on the upper end of the insert. Those tabs slip into matching slots in the saw. On the bottom end of the insert is a rounded, sloped cutout. A rotating cam locks the insert in its place. The question was, "How to duplicate Bosch's zero clearance insert with a homemade insert?"

After several months of studying the problem (NOT full time!) I noticed the small screw holes in the tabs that support the insert. I tested them and they are metric size M4 threads. You can drill and countersink screws to hold a homemade insert in place. That is the answer I have been looking for!

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:30 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Instructions for Building Your Own Zero Clearance Table Insert for a Bosch REAXX Table Saw
(Apologies in advance for the strange combination of Imperial and Metric measurements.)

Materials:
* Bosch REAXX table saw
* Bosch insert plate from your REAXX saw, used or new.
* Wood board, 3/8 inches thick, large enough to cover the table insert hole.
* Four (4) M4x16 flathead screws
* Five (5) M6x8 set screws

Tools Needed:
* Pencil
* Ruler
* 4 mm drill
* Countersink for M4 screw flatheads
* 5 mm drill
* 1-3/8 inch drill to cut a crescent from the edge. I used a Forstener bit. You could use a hole saw, jigsaw, bandsaw, or scroll saw.
* Tool for cutting rabbets - I used an 8 inch dado blade set in my Bosch REAXX table saw, but you could also use a router (preferably with a router table).
* Screwdriver for M4x16 screws. Normally they are Phillips, but I found slot head M4x16 screws at one hardware store.
* Hex key (Allen wrench) for M6x8 set screws.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #3 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:48 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Procedure:

0. Unplug your Bosch REAXX table saw.

Photo: Bosch REAXX saw unplugged.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	0-1 Bosch REAXX Unplugged.JPG
Views:	164
Size:	77.1 KB
ID:	347649  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:31 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:49 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
1. Make a 3/8 inch Thick Blank to Match the Outline of the Insert

You can do it in one of two ways:

Table Saw with Bandsaw or Jigsaw Method:

* Invert the Bosch insert so that its top is on the board, so you can use it as a drawing template. Using a pencil, trace a line on the board around the perimeter of the Bosch insert. Omit the two tabs.
* Using the table saw, cut the top, bottom, and sides along the lines, to match the insert.
* Using the bandsaw or jigsaw, cut the rounded corners to match the insert template lines.

Router Method:

* Make a 3/8 inch board, rough cut to match the Bosch table insert, but with a small excess on all sides.
* Use double-sided thin "carpet tape" to attach the top of your Bosch table insert to your board.
* Use a flush trim router bit or template router bit to make the board match the outline of the Bosch insert. Note: The router will have trouble following the tabs at the top, and also the crescent cutout at the bottom. That's okay.
* Trim or sand any excess on your board where the router went around the tabs at the top of the insert.

Photos:
1. Match board size to Bosch insert.
2. Trim corners to match.
3. Plane board thickness to 3/8 inch.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1-1 Match Board Size to Insert.JPG
Views:	167
Size:	104.6 KB
ID:	347689  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1-2 Trim Corners.JPG
Views:	119
Size:	73.5 KB
ID:	347697  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1-3 Board is 3-8 Inch Thick.JPG
Views:	107
Size:	88.9 KB
ID:	347705  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:32 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #5 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:52 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
2. Cut a Stopped Rabbet Along One Edge of the Board to Match the Bosch Insert
* Observe the raised strip of metal on the lower left side of the insert hole in the REAXX table saw. Observe the matching rabbet (edge groove). You must cut a similar rabbet on your board.
* Invert the Bosch insert and place it on your board. Make a mark on your board where the top angle of the rabbet touches the edge of the insert. This is where you will stop your rabbet (the peak of the dado blade).
* Use your table saw or router table to make a 1 inch wide rabbet along the side of your board to match the rabbet on the Bosch insert. Use a stop block to make sure you stop the rabbet at correct point (to match where the diagonal touches the edge). The rabbet will be approximately 1/4 inch, but start small.
* Slowly raise the blade or router bit and repeat the cut until the thinness of rabbeted edge of your board matches the thinness of the Bosch insert where the rabbet is located.
* Make a one inch wide dado, but ONLY ONE INCH LONG. Make it adjacent to the long rabbet. It will match the "wrap around" curve at the bottom of the Bosch insert's rabbet.

Photos:
1. Cutting rabbet using featherboard and stop block.
2. Homemade rabbet vs. Bosch insert.
3. Raise dado blade or router bit until rabbet matches the Bosch insert.
4. Final version of rabbet and adjacent short dado.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2-1 Cutting Rabbet.JPG
Views:	167
Size:	146.4 KB
ID:	347713  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2-2 Matching Rabbets.JPG
Views:	107
Size:	77.4 KB
ID:	347721  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2-3 Match Board Thickness.JPG
Views:	108
Size:	61.9 KB
ID:	347729  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2-4 Final Rabbet and Dado.JPG
Views:	154
Size:	89.7 KB
ID:	347737  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:57 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #6 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:52 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
3. Drill Out the Crescent at the Bottom of the Insert
* Mark the two points where the round cam lock "crescent" on the Bosch insert touches the bottom edge of the board.
* Use a tool to cut out the crescent on the bottom of your board. I used a 1-3/8 inch Forstener bit in a drill press. I lined up the Forstener bit so that it matched the two points and cut the crescent out. You could also use a bandsaw, a jigsaw, a file, etc.

Photo: Crescent cut with Forstener bit.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	3-1 Forstener Crescent.JPG
Views:	140
Size:	73.2 KB
ID:	347745  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:36 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #7 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:53 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
4. Test the Fit
* If you have a dado blade installed in your REAXX saw, then fully lower the blade. If your blade is a typical 10 inch blade, remove it.
* Retract the riving knife to its lowest position, to get it out of the way.
* Test the fit of your board in the insert hole. It should be a perfect fit, sitting slightly low in the insert hole. Your board must be at or below the table height at all points along the edge.
* You can remove your board by lifting up at the crescent cutout.
* If any corners are binding, now is the time to fix the problem with a file or sandpaper.
* If the board height is above the table at any point, plane it down or sand it until the board surface matches or lies below the table surface.

Photo: Riving Knife Lowered
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	4-1 Riving Knife Lowered.JPG
Views:	115
Size:	99.1 KB
ID:	347753  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 07:01 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #8 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:56 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
5. Mark the Screw Holes on Your Board
* Thread the M4x16 screws UPSIDE DOWN in the four screw holes on the tabs of the insert plate hole on your REAXX table saw. Be sure that the tips of the screws protrude above the tabs.
* Press your board firmly on top of the screws. Use the tips of the screws to mark the drill points on your board. Flip the board over, and make sure you can find all four marks from the screws. The screw in the lower left corner may be hidden in the short dado that you made earlier. You may have to raise this screw a little more to get it to register in the board.
* When you are done marking the screw locations, remove the four screws from the holes in the table saw.

Photos:
1. Inverted screw in hole.
2. Inverted screws in holes.
3. Mark made by pressing board into screw.
4. Screw marks in board.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	5-1 Inverted Screw in Hole.JPG
Views:	106
Size:	61.5 KB
ID:	347801  

Click image for larger version

Name:	5-2 Inverted Screws in Holes.JPG
Views:	109
Size:	97.0 KB
ID:	347809  

Click image for larger version

Name:	5-3 Screw Mark.JPG
Views:	98
Size:	99.9 KB
ID:	347817  

Click image for larger version

Name:	5-4 Screw Marks in Board.JPG
Views:	105
Size:	70.8 KB
ID:	347825  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:38 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #9 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:56 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
6. Drill the Screw Holes on Your Board
* Using a 4mm drill, drill the four screw holes precisely in the centers of the marks. I used a brad point drill.
* Countersink the tops of the four screw holes so that the flat heads of the M4x16 screws are below the surface of your board.

Photos:
1. Countersunk hole.
2. Countersunk holes in board.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	6-1 Countersunk Hole.JPG
Views:	97
Size:	51.7 KB
ID:	347865  

Click image for larger version

Name:	6-2 Countersunk Holes.JPG
Views:	115
Size:	55.8 KB
ID:	347881  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:38 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #10 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
7. Mark and Drill the Adjustment Holes on Your Board
* On the drop of your board, place a mark exactly 1/2 inch above the center of each countersink screw hole.
* Place a fifth mark exactly four inches above the lower left screw hole.
* Using a 5mm drill, drill holes through your board at the five marks. I used a brad point drill.

Photos:
1. Mark all five adjustment holes.
2. Mark the lower left adjustment holes - 1/2 inch and 4 inches above the lower left hole.
3. Drill each hole with a 5mm drill bit.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	7-1 Mark 5 Adjustment Holes.JPG
Views:	125
Size:	79.6 KB
ID:	347889  

Click image for larger version

Name:	7-2 Mark Lower Left Holes.JPG
Views:	110
Size:	70.0 KB
ID:	347897  

Click image for larger version

Name:	7-3 Drill Hole.JPG
Views:	87
Size:	68.1 KB
ID:	347905  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:40 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #11 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
8. Insert the Set Screws and Adjust Your Board
* Using a hex key (Allen wrench), insert the five M6x8 set screws in the 5mm holes. Turn them until they reach the bottom of the board.
* Place your board in the hole on your table saw.
* Use the hex key to adjust each set screw until your board is level with the table on all edges.

Photos:
1. Set screws, including one that is partially inserted.
2. Using an Allen wrench (hex key) to turn a set screw into its hole.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	8-1 Insert Set Screws.JPG
Views:	107
Size:	79.2 KB
ID:	347937  

Click image for larger version

Name:	8-2 Adjust Set Screws to Level Board.JPG
Views:	120
Size:	73.9 KB
ID:	347953  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:42 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #12 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 06:02 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
9. Lock the Board in Place and Raise the Blade
DANGER: See "Problems and Issues", below.
* Lower the blade fully below the surface of the table saw. If the blade prevents the insert board from resting fully on the tabs, STOP IMMEDIATELY and see "Problems and Issues", below.
* Attach your insert board firmly to the table using the four M4x16 screws. Be sure the screw heads are below the surface of the board.
* Stand out of the way and turn on the REAXX table saw.
* Slowly raise the blade through your new zero clearance insert.

Photos:
1. Screws started, ready to tighten.
2. Screws in place, with heads below the surface of the board.
3. Raising the blade. In this case, it is a 1/4 inch dado (two blades only).
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	9-1 Screws Ready.JPG
Views:	134
Size:	68.0 KB
ID:	347961  

Click image for larger version

Name:	9-2 Screws Tight.JPG
Views:	161
Size:	61.3 KB
ID:	347969  

Click image for larger version

Name:	9-3 Raise Blade.JPG
Views:	500
Size:	73.9 KB
ID:	347977  


Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 06:44 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #13 of 18 Old 03-10-2018, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
ISSUES AND PROBLEMS:

Important Note about Issues and Problems: The primary reason that I wanted my own table saw inserts is to have zero clearance table saw inserts to match different widths from my dado set. My 8 inch dado blade set fits under the homemade insert with no problems, and you don't use a riving knife with a dado set. The issues and problems listed below do not apply to my dado set, only ordinary 10 inch table saw blades.

* DANGER: Fitting a Full Size Blade under the Homemade Table Insert
DANGER: I have not found a safe way to fit a full size standard blade under this homemade table insert, for when it is time to raise the blade and cut the zero clearance slot.

The best approach would be to create a stopped dado groove where the blade raises, so that the blade can fit under the insert before it is turned on and raised. Unfortunately, my Forrest Woodworker II 10 inch blade is too large. It protrudes slightly above the table, even when the blade is fully retracted.

I DO NOT recommend trying to lower a homemade insert onto a blade to cut the slot. If you attempt this dangerous maneuver, you risk serious injury from a kickback.

* No Easy Way to Make a Slot for the Riving Knife
The Bosch TS1006 insert comes with a pre-cut slot for the riving knife. My homemade insert does not. You won't need a riving knife slot if you use the homemade insert with a dado set. If you need a riving knife slot for a standard blade, you could use a jigsaw to cut it. Use the slot from raising the blade as a guide.


* Where to Find M4x16 Flathead Screws and M6x8 Set Screws
The big box stores carry both, in small two packs in the section with the many drawers labeled "Metric." I also found them at two different Ace hardware stores. The flathead screws can be found with Philips or slot heads. I do not recommend slot head screws. The set screws can be found in silver and in black. Be sure you have an Allen wrench (hex key) that fits your set screws. Screw prices vary a lot. They are two for a dollar at the big box store (Ouch!!).


... I hope this helps the few people who may stumble upon this work and who actually own Bosch REAXX table saws.
montero65 likes this.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-10-2018 at 07:08 PM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #14 of 18 Old 04-17-2018, 12:51 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Livonia, MI
Posts: 18
View montero65's Photo Album My Photos
I don't own one of these saws, but it's a great write-up that you've put together here. Very detailed, and I like that you even mentioned the issues/problems you came across. Well done!

Tools: Grizzly G0771Z table saw (replaced Skil 3400 saw), Craftsman 10" sliding miter saw, Ryobi band saw, Ryobi drill press, Ryobi 18V cordless (many)
montero65 is offline  
post #15 of 18 Old 04-18-2018, 08:19 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you for your kind words. This was a quest for me, and I hope it helps others.

It would be nice to know whether Bosch REAXX saw owners are finding and following this procedure for themselves, based on web searches that start outside Woodworking Talk. I assume so, but there is no way to know.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #16 of 18 Old 04-18-2018, 03:02 PM
Mad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 244
View Mad's Photo Album My Photos
I followed your instructions explicitly... and stopped reading after the first line in the second paragraph of your first post... where you said to stop reading then and there if you don't have a REAXX saw. I don't. So I stopped reading like you told me to.


But I couldn't help but at least take a peak at the rest of your post, and the many subsequent posts you made thereafter, with detailed formatting, such as headlines in bold, and enumerated points, all of which contribute to communicating the clarity of your ideas. And these delicious details in the delineated delivery of prose are further supplemented by an abundance of step by step photos. This is really great content, and I know from personal experience that it takes about 100 times more time to CREATE quality content like this than it takes to read it.


So even though it doesn't apply to me, I really appreciate the time you have taken to share your ideas in the detailed manner in which you have demonstrated. Thank you!
montero65 likes this.

Last edited by Mad; 04-18-2018 at 03:04 PM.
Mad is offline  
post #17 of 18 Old 04-18-2018, 03:44 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,573
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Cutting the first kerf in the insert.......

There are 2 simple ways to make the first blade kerf in a blank insert:

First method, using the 10" size blade requires a relief in the blade path on the bottom of the insert. This can be done on a router table with a 1/2" bit set to 1/4" from the top. It requires a plunge or drop cut with fore and aft marks or stops on the fence, since you are routing "blind" up from the bottom.

The second method uses a smaller diameter blade, 8" or more commonly available a 7 1/4" contractor blade with a 5/8" bore. This allow you to secure the insert in the table with the fence and slowing raise the blade up and through the blank inert. Typically these blade are thinner than most table saw blades so it may be necessary to use a thin washer on the saw's arbor to space it out a bit more making a wider kerf..... it all depends on each blade's kerf width.

Tool Agnostic likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-18-2018 at 03:53 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #18 of 18 Old 07-07-2019, 10:22 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,345
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Hello friends. Here is an update: I replaced my Bosch REAXX jobsite saw.

I really liked that Bosch REAXX and would recommend it for anyone needing a jobsite saw with safety capabilities. It is one of the jobsite saws that can be used for fine woodworking. Unfortunately, my saw kept triggering its safety mechanism, and it reached a point where the saw could not be sustained because of the issue. Bosch technical support was outstanding - I cannot say enough good things about them. Even though this particular saw did not work out, I like Bosch tools and will continue to buy them as needs arise.

It is important to have a safety mechanism in a table saw, so I replaced the REAXX with a SawStop PCS175. It is an excellent saw, and I am pleased to have it. A cabinet saw offers many superior features to a jobsite saw, and it is a joy to use. I have been vocal about SawStop's licensing practices, but I have also freely stated that SawStop makes excellent tools. My feelings have not changed. Nonetheless, if you want a table saw with a safety blade retraction mechanism, Bosch REAXX and SawStop are the only choices, and the Bosch REAXX is not available in the US at this time.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
Reply

Tags
reaxx, table insert, zero clearance, zero clearance insert

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Build Your Own Router Table treewok2512 Power Tools & Machinery 23 09-16-2018 12:47 PM
Bosch Reaxx anyone? glitchkb Power Tools & Machinery 17 03-10-2018 06:13 PM
Table saw dado insert jereklink Power Tools & Machinery 7 12-20-2016 07:04 AM
Wolfcraft 6157 router table. dbhost Tool Reviews 2 10-02-2015 07:22 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome