Bosch POF1400ACE plunge router question - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 23 Old 09-26-2010, 03:01 PM Thread Starter
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Bosch POF1400ACE plunge router question

Hi !
I am a new member on this forum and I'm a begginer in woodworking. A couple of weeks ago I've bought myself a Bosch pof1400ace plunge router. Since I'm a begginer and this is my first router I'm still toying around and discovering things, that could be done with this machine. The router is nice; it has a soft start, fine adjustment of depht (0.1mm step), plenty of power for my needs (I guess) and It's not so loud. The cuts I've made are nice and clean and the surface finish is smooth.
But there is one thing that is bothering me. The locking mechanism locks only the shaft on the left. The right shaft is able to move slightly under downward pressure. If I look closely and press on the right handle I can see the router bit moves left a few degrees and it's no more perpendicular to the surface I'm routing. A few days ago when shopping I examined a few other routers (B&D KW900 and Bosch pof1200, Einhell-something) and all had the same thing.
Still, I need to ask you if you have any experiences about this case.
Thanks a lot for the answer.
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post #2 of 23 Old 09-27-2010, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
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No one with any experiences regarding plunge routers?
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post #3 of 23 Old 09-29-2010, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all of you for your kindness help and support .
I will praise this forum up to the sky. Best wishes to all.
With regards
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post #4 of 23 Old 09-29-2010, 12:10 PM
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giltic, please notice over a 100 people have read your post, the problem with most of us is we are just not familiar with a router used in the UK instead of the US or we have never seen this specific router. We are sorry and we don't want you to leave the forum as there are many many fantastic folks here who can help in many ways. It is just that you asked a question right off the bat that no one, so far, knows the answer to.

I have many routers and do have a Bosch (not that one) and haven't had the problems that you are. If it were mine I would take it back and see about getting another one.

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post #5 of 23 Old 09-29-2010, 09:57 PM
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Hi. just read your post. Like dude sorry I didn't get to it sooner.

I could buy an electric guitar but the first time I plug it in I won't sound like Eric Clapton.

In my shop I have several different routers, plunge and a cpl fixed bases. Bosch, Porter cable, Makita and I've used other colours too.
The 4 bosch's I have are pleasures to work with. Sturdy, quiet and accurate. They are my favorites.

Plunge bases have two shafts, and as far as I know none are made with two locking shafts. And even if there is, big deal.

Don't blame the tool for your lack of experience and technique.
You have bought a quality tool that will last you a very long time. All you have to do now is make lots of saw dust. There is skill in them chips.
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post #6 of 23 Old 09-30-2010, 01:56 PM Thread Starter
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I am sencerely sorry for my reaction. I thought that I was ignored completly. I'm somehow frustrated and I have a feeling that i've spent 150€ for a junk product.
Don't get me wrong; I'm not so green as it seems. It's just my first router. Otherwise I have a lot of experience with all sorts of machines for metal working (CNC lathes, CNC grinders, all sorts of milling machines...). I'm mechanical engineer and I design tools on CAD/CAM for special operations in my company for more than 18 years. I have also designed a few machines.
I was just asking, if a plunge router is supposed to be built this way as mine is. The left pillar is made as it should - it's polished and with closed tolerances regarding the bushing (sorry; my english is a bit rusty). But the left pillar is not machined at all - it's black and has rough surface and there is more then 0.5mm of space between the pillar and a bushing. So if I put the pressure on the right handle, the router bit swings left and the pivot is the left bushing of course. The router bit is no more perpendicular to the working piece but tilted for a certain angle. First I thought that I'm doing something wrong and there is a special technique to hold the router on the working piece. Then I start looking on the web and I've found guys with the same problem. One of them is from Australia and he wrote: I bought a new 1/2" variable speed Bosch router some years ago for use under my table. I soon found that applying pressure tilted the cutter slightly towards the fence. This surprised me because the two pillars looked to be ginormous, that is until I lifted the rubber boots to find disappointingly thin pillars. I shimmed the router to lean forward to compensate and this worked in a fashion until I discovered MAKITA routers, what a difference!
The other guy says: I recently purchased this router (http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-1613AEVS-4-Horsepower-Electronic-Plunge/dp/B00005RHPG%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAJUGTHVYJQBVOSLCQ%26tag%3Dcompressorsair-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3DB00005RHPG) and within days of receiving it tried it out cutting mortise and tenons. While many of the features were nice I found the accuracy and ruggedness of the router to be lacking. The plunging action was fine except that the bit will move off of perpendicular due to lack of rigidity in the plunge mechanism and the rods the router moves on.
So apparently I'm not the only one with problems with Bosch router.
When I hold the router with one hand and try to turn the base clockwise and counter clockwise it actually moves a few degrees left and right and I can hear the right pillar cnocking on the shaft.

But still; it's my first router. I just want to ask all of you if this is common for plunge routers? Is any special trick to hold the router so the bit won't move off it's perpendicularity?

By the way; thanks for all the answers and I appologise once more.
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post #7 of 23 Old 09-30-2010, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giltic View Post
I am sencerely sorry for my reaction. I thought that I was ignored completly. I'm somehow frustrated and I have a feeling that i've spent 150€ for a junk product.
Don't get me wrong; I'm not so green as it seems. It's just my first router. Otherwise I have a lot of experience with all sorts of machines for metal working (CNC lathes, CNC grinders, all sorts of milling machines...). I'm mechanical engineer and I design tools on CAD/CAM for special operations in my company for more than 18 years. I have also designed a few machines.
I was just asking, if a plunge router is supposed to be built this way as mine is. The left pillar is made as it should - it's polished and with closed tolerances regarding the bushing (sorry; my english is a bit rusty). But the left pillar is not machined at all - it's black and has rough surface and there is more then 0.5mm of space between the pillar and a bushing. So if I put the pressure on the right handle, the router bit swings left and the pivot is the left bushing of course. The router bit is no more perpendicular to the working piece but tilted for a certain angle. First I thought that I'm doing something wrong and there is a special technique to hold the router on the working piece. Then I start looking on the web and I've found guys with the same problem. One of them is from Australia and he wrote: I bought a new 1/2" variable speed Bosch router some years ago for use under my table. I soon found that applying pressure tilted the cutter slightly towards the fence. This surprised me because the two pillars looked to be ginormous, that is until I lifted the rubber boots to find disappointingly thin pillars. I shimmed the router to lean forward to compensate and this worked in a fashion until I discovered MAKITA routers, what a difference!
The other guy says: I recently purchased this router (Bosch 1613AEVS 2-1/4-Horsepower Electronic Plunge Router) and within days of receiving it tried it out cutting mortise and tenons. While many of the features were nice I found the accuracy and ruggedness of the router to be lacking. The plunging action was fine except that the bit will move off of perpendicular due to lack of rigidity in the plunge mechanism and the rods the router moves on.
So apparently I'm not the only one with problems with Bosch router.
When I hold the router with one hand and try to turn the base clockwise and counter clockwise it actually moves a few degrees left and right and I can hear the right pillar cnocking on the shaft.

But still; it's my first router. I just want to ask all of you if this is common for plunge routers? Is any special trick to hold the router so the bit won't move off it's perpendicularity?

By the way; thanks for all the answers and I appologise once more.
It is good to see you back buddy. No a router should not do that at all, if it is moving even the slightest when locked it is no good to you, it will not make a quality cut. I personally have never seen a Bosch product that was bad but it looks like they have one now. I would for sure take it back. I can just see trimming a counter top with that router, it would be ruined.

Did the Makita have the slack like that one did? I am sure it did not, as Makita is a very good product. I am really surprised at Bosch, it has always been my favorite brand of hand tool. You can bet I will be checking every tool I pick up from now on. We appreciate the heads up from you.

Again, welcome back, you are really going to love it here, these are some fine folks.

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Last edited by BigJim; 09-30-2010 at 10:33 PM.
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post #8 of 23 Old 09-30-2010, 09:02 PM
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Ahhh CNC, the one in my shop is named Princess Tiffany.

All my plunge routers have smooth shafts and they are not sloppy at all.
I can get a slight deflection on a couple Porter cables But all the Bosch and Makitas are solid.
Call bosch technical support. they can help you sort it out.
good luck with it.
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post #9 of 23 Old 10-01-2010, 05:17 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply.
I must say this is a design fault; all pof1400ace are made that way. Also a model pof1200ace is built that way.
Otherwise It's a fine product. It has soft start, fine depth adjustment (0.1mm step), constant power electronics, two leds to enlight the working area and its not loud. This is the best I could get for 150€. One chance is to take it back and get another brand. For similar price I can only get Black&Decker KW900EKA or Black&Decker XTW1500EKA (no soft start, no fine depth adjustment, no leds and they look and feel really cheap made). Makita, DeWalt and Bosch blue are all far more expensive (from 350€ up to 600€). Metabo is also expensive. And of course I could get low price router like Einhell, NuTools, ID Tools and Alpha Tools for about 30 to 50€.
The other option is to take in to service. Chance is that the company is now aware of the fault and I will get a proper pillar with a proper bushing. If not, I will get a new pillar with the same problem.
The third chance is to repair the router by myself. I would made a proper pillar and bushing with closed tolerances. Then all I need is to disassemble it and replace those parts.
I think I will first take it to the service and if the router will have the same problem, I'll decide what to do.
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post #10 of 23 Old 10-01-2010, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giltic View Post
Thanks for the reply.
I must say this is a design fault; all pof1400ace are made that way. Also a model pof1200ace is built that way.
Otherwise It's a fine product. It has soft start, fine depth adjustment (0.1mm step), constant power electronics, two leds to enlight the working area and its not loud. This is the best I could get for 150€. One chance is to take it back and get another brand. For similar price I can only get Black&Decker KW900EKA or Black&Decker XTW1500EKA (no soft start, no fine depth adjustment, no leds and they look and feel really cheap made). Makita, DeWalt and Bosch blue are all far more expensive (from 350€ up to 600€). Metabo is also expensive. And of course I could get low price router like Einhell, NuTools, ID Tools and Alpha Tools for about 30 to 50€.
The other option is to take in to service. Chance is that the company is now aware of the fault and I will get a proper pillar with a proper bushing. If not, I will get a new pillar with the same problem.
The third chance is to repair the router by myself. I would made a proper pillar and bushing with closed tolerances. Then all I need is to disassemble it and replace those parts.
I think I will first take it to the service and if the router will have the same problem, I'll decide what to do.
giltic, I don't know where you live or how to make the money exchange to dollars but if that machine you bought is compared to a Black and Decker such as we have here in the US it isn't very good at all. I was not aware that Bosch had a product line that inexpensive.

A router that moves like you are talking about can be dangerous and can only make a person frustrated trying to get it to do what a router is supposed to do. If I couldn't afford the plunge router that worked properly I would go with a fixed base router, at least it will not move and hurt you or mess your work up.

By the way, the Dewalt is not in the same class as the blue Bosch or Makita, I have all of these routers and while the Dewalt does do a great job it just will not hold up like the Bosch and Mikita.

If you are wanting to make a router table I would recommend the MV12 Hitachi, it is very strong and will hold up under a fair amount of pressure. The MV12 doesn't look like much and does look cheap but it will get the job done.

As for the soft start deal, if you buy a router with that feature you will more than likely be wireing that dude to by pass that feature as it will not last long.

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post #11 of 23 Old 10-01-2010, 10:58 AM
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I dont believe a soft start router will work with a router speed control either.

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post #12 of 23 Old 10-01-2010, 08:17 PM
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I got a Bosch 1617 and been using it in a table, fixed and plunge base with no problems at all. From the picks I have seen of router you have, it seems to be a lower quality router than the ones they market here in US. Suggest trading up to higher end router. That edge guide is really flimsy looking too.
Can be seen at Amazon-UK.
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post #13 of 23 Old 10-02-2010, 12:27 AM
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giltic' Please be patient with us, most of us spend a lot of time away from our computers.
I too have the Bosch 1617 and have worked it very hard with only one complaint. When using the plunge base lately,it seems I have to actually pull the lever to the lock position a little tighter than it falls back on its own. It started after years of use and may be easily fixed by cleaning it and I should get on that.
Any way, I feel the Bosch tools I've used are excellent quality and will certainly buy one again.
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post #14 of 23 Old 10-02-2010, 02:34 PM Thread Starter
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I'm starting to thinking that the same Bosch tools has somehow lower quality for our market then for USA.
Today I went to the store to return the router and they didn't want to replace it. They said they will send it to the service for a repair. Then I examined all Bosch routers (POF1200 and POF1400) in the store and all of them had the same problem with right pillar. They are all 'Made in China'. I wonder how the service will repair my router. If they'll just replace the pillar then the router will have exactly the same problem. I just hope that after repair my router won't be in worst shape then befor the repair.

jiju1943; you are correct.
B&D also is not really example of good quality and reliability around here. POF1400 costs here 150€ and POF1200 costs 100€. Black&Decker KW900EKA costs about 100€ and XTW1500EKA is about 110€. The green Bosch is better quality then B&D but not a lot better. I just didn't like B&D routers. Makita, Metabo, Bosch blue and DeWalt are far more expensive. DeWalt comes from the same place as B&D (If I'm correct); it's just suppose to be better quality (something like Bosch green and blue).
If my router will come from service with the same problem then I will repair it by myself. I will make a new pillar and a new bushing as it should be by myself. Apparently Bosch is no more an example of good German quality. Today I was holding in my hands Einhell router for 50€ and it has no problem with plunging mechanism at all. So how Bosch can't make it good for 150€?
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post #15 of 23 Old 10-02-2010, 02:55 PM
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What is this little sign stand for € behind the amount of money? Some of us ole southern boys don't know what that is.

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post #16 of 23 Old 10-02-2010, 11:17 PM
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€ means euros...european currency
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post #17 of 23 Old 10-03-2010, 03:58 AM Thread Starter
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jiju1943;
€ stands for european currency called EURO.
Basicly; euro is our money here in Europe like dollar is your money in USA and canadian dollar is money in Canada and in Mexico they have pesos.
Exchange rate is : for 1 EURO you get 1,3726 US dollar
Around here Bosch POF1400ACE costs 150 euros. If I decide to pay with dollars I would have to pay 150*1,3726=205.89 US dollars.
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post #18 of 23 Old 10-03-2010, 10:00 AM
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jiju1943;
€ stands for european currency called EURO.
Basicly; euro is our money here in Europe like dollar is your money in USA and canadian dollar is money in Canada and in Mexico they have pesos.
Exchange rate is : for 1 EURO you get 1,3726 US dollar
Around here Bosch POF1400ACE costs 150 euros. If I decide to pay with dollars I would have to pay 150*1,3726=205.89 US dollars.
My stars, ya'll are getting ripped off. I can buy the Bosch 1617EVS for $232.00 here which is one of the Bosch I have and there is nothing wrong with it. That is not right that ya'll can't get the same thing we can at the price we can. Here is the link to the Bosch router. http://www.mytoolstore.com/bosch/routers.html

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post #19 of 23 Old 10-04-2010, 06:43 AM Thread Starter
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I can't get Bosch 1617EVS around here. But if I could I bet it would be much more expensive.
Check out that prices from one of our shops:
Makita 3612C - 491€=673$
Makita 3612 - 386€=529$
Makita RP1110C - 332€=455$
Bosch GMF1400CE - 463€=634$
Bosch GOF1300 - 357€=489$
Bosch GOF2000CE - 516€=706$
DeWALT DW625E - 445€=601$
DeWALT DW621K - 366€=501$
Bosch GOF900 - 284€=390$
Tools are expensive and I think not the same quality as the tools for US market. A lot of tools in our stores is assembled in China and the same models for US market is assembled in Germany. So you ca imagine the rip off.
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post #20 of 23 Old 10-04-2010, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by giltic View Post
I can't get Bosch 1617EVS around here. But if I could I bet it would be much more expensive.
Check out that prices from one of our shops:
Makita 3612C - 491€=673$
Makita 3612 - 386€=529$
Makita RP1110C - 332€=455$
Bosch GMF1400CE - 463€=634$
Bosch GOF1300 - 357€=489$
Bosch GOF2000CE - 516€=706$
DeWALT DW625E - 445€=601$
DeWALT DW621K - 366€=501$
Bosch GOF900 - 284€=390$
Tools are expensive and I think not the same quality as the tools for US market. A lot of tools in our stores is assembled in China and the same models for US market is assembled in Germany. So you ca imagine the rip off.
I don't know how much shipping is but if you want one I will be more than happy to ship you one of any of these routers. Wait a minute, American tools won't work over there will they? That surely can't be the difference in cost. That is just the most absurd thing I ever heard of. Is there a way to change an American tool over to work over there?

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