Boards are slightly twisted out of Jointer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 09:33 AM Thread Starter
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Boards are slightly twisted out of Jointer

I have an old Craftsman 6” Jointer that I’ve had for years and I believe it’s in alignment with new knives. I’m not sure if the wood is twisting after cutting or if I’m doing something wrong.

The wood is Doug Fir premium studs from Lowes and cut to 36” lengths. I choose the stud with at least 2 - 3’ clear sections without knots and cut them accordingly before running them through the jointer.

The only other thing that is different from my normal was that I recently watched a Video on the proper use of a jointer. Ever since I’ve had this jointer, I have always held the piece down hard on the outfeed table keeping it flat on that side and I usually run it through at least 3 times on low depth.

The video said to not push the piece down because it can flex and come out bowed or twisted. So I tried that and it seemed to be working well until after I took it out of the planer and sat it down on my cast iron table saw.

Now this all didn’t happen in one session because I had a couple of appointments to go to and it took a couple of days before I finished it, so I’m not sure if the pieces twisted overnight before completing them.

So do you thing I make a mistake in changing my jointer technique?


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post #2 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 10:27 AM
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I think you need to check the knives and see if they are all level with the rear table. If you have one that on one side is too high it can cause the wood to be jointed out of square. The jointer shouldn't make a board twisted if if isn't already. The amount of pressure shouldn't make that much difference if the blades are sharp and installed correctly. You just need enough pressure to prevent the wood from resisting being cut and raise off the table.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 10:30 AM
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It probably isn't your jointer technique. It could be several reasons. As you plane, you need to keep flipping and planning both surfaces...

I bet your problem is your lumber. It doesn't matter where you buy it, but Douglas fir is an unstable wood for the most part. It is grown fast and cut for production. What you need to do is look at the end grain of your lumber. If the grain runs across, it is called flatsawn which is the more common lumber, but the flatter, the worst it is. The best lumber is quartersawn with grain running up and down. There is a good possibility that the end grain of your Douglas fir has a circle or close too it. That means whatever you do to your lumber, it will be twisted the next day. It took me a long time to figure that out.

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post #4 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 12:03 PM Thread Starter
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I guess I should have posted a photo of the boards with the first post because I'm not sure about the grain.


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post #5 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 02:32 PM
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Just curious, what is the moisture content of those pieces?

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post #6 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 02:40 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
Just curious, what is the moisture content of those pieces?
I have no idea, but I would think they are pretty dry. At least there isn't any sap that I see or can feel.

I chose this wood because I wanted it 1 inch thick and this is my only choice unless I glue two pieces together which is probably what I should have done anyway.

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post #7 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 03:20 PM
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I think you just bought some twisted wood. Often it's really difficult to see in the board store.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 03:37 PM Thread Starter
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I’m going to rip both of them in half and run them through the jointer again. I’m then going to flip them end to end and glue them together. After the glue dries I’ll try to straighten them again and see what happens.
I can’t be sure, but it looks like they got a little worst today after sitting overnight.

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post #9 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 06:58 PM
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Just press down firmly

You don't have to use body weight to hold them flat on the outfeed table, just press down firmly. Your wood twisted because the grain is exactly going the wrong direction, it's horizontal across the face and it should be vertical. Also if you sawed only off one side or jointed it mostly off one side that will make it twist also.

I use about the same pressure feeding on the jointer as I use on the table saw... down and forward simultaneously. You have to sight the board before making any passes to see where the material needs to be removed ...maybe just off each end and when your board is twisted you may have to favor a good deal of pressure to the fence as well as to the table to keep it "square" as possible. It's a learned technique that you acquire the more you do it. Taking a lighter cut will be better than too heavy of a cut.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-31-2016 at 09:19 PM.
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 08:49 PM Thread Starter
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I had completely forgotten about the wood grain. It was probably over 25 years ago when I first heard about it and believe it not it was one of the HomeDepot lumber department employees that told me about it.

I was looking for something that wasnít going to warp and the guy helped me pick out what I needed. I doubt that anyone who works there now knows anything about wood. Anyway I probably forgot about it as soon as I walked out the door.

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post #11 of 11 Old 01-31-2016, 11:11 PM
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End grain is what you need to look at when buying wood. a quick look at your wood - it wasn't cut from the center of the tree (avoid that), but your grain is flat across the width of the boards (also to be avoided).

The lumber of your choice (Douglas Fir) is grown quick and cut early (in tree years). It's designed for construction and was expected to be inside a wall as a support and was also expected to be covered and buried out of sight.

Your jointer is a good start but you should also have a planner at your disposal. If you do own one, go to a hardwood supplier in your area and purchase some unfinished lumber (cheaper then the S4 [surfaced on 4 sides]). I'm not sure the availability of such lumber in your area (I have family in Lancaster Ca) but do your homework and try to bite the bullet if you can. It will be worth your effort. The best wood is the quartersawn (grain running up and down) as opposed to the flatsawn (grain running across), but quartersawn is the pick of the crop and hard to find.

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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