Beginner here be kind =oP - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 15 Old 10-17-2017, 02:26 PM Thread Starter
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Post Beginner here be kind =oP

Where do you recommend to get tools ? Online, store,used,new,pros,cons,warranties,companies tool/retail and anything else you think a beginner should know ???
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post #2 of 15 Old 10-17-2017, 03:48 PM
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As you read the post on the forum you find our members have bought tools from all your list above.
I personally will not pay extra for an extended warranty. Good tools will last for many years trouble free if not abused and kept dry. Most woodworking machinery are very simple tools made to give many years of service. Because of this, I have had very good experiences with used tools. As a rule of thumb I think a good used tool should be about half price vs a new tool.
There are new brands available now with lifetime warranties.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #3 of 15 Old 10-20-2017, 04:34 PM
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For power tools I've purchased mostly reconditioned tools. They are pretty much like new and much lower cost. I don't really care if there is a tiny minor scratch or two since I'll put a few on myself.
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post #4 of 15 Old 10-20-2017, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Loera View Post
Where do you recommend to get tools ? Online, store,used,new,pros,cons,warranties,companies tool/retail and anything else you think a beginner should know ???
A lifetime of experience in a forum question.

Buying tools can be simple or complex.

Some simple questions right back at you might be do you have any money?

Are you trying to put a functional shop together with a limited budget?

Do you want the best of everything now and are you willing to pay for it?

Do you have space to set up a real shop?

Enough space for shop tools or do you really need portable tools?

Is it your space or someone else space?

What are you planning on using the tools for?
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post #5 of 15 Old 10-20-2017, 07:09 PM
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Are you talking about power equipment, hand tools or both? What do you want to do with these tools?
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post #6 of 15 Old 10-20-2017, 08:26 PM
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Most hand tools and hand held power tools I buy from Harbor Freight. Machinery I buy old heavy industrial machinery I find on ebay and craigslist. You can get some great machinery cheap which runs on three phase. Just get a phase converter and that solves that problem.
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post #7 of 15 Old 10-20-2017, 10:24 PM
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I have done all three; bought new (Grizzly table saw), bought reconditioned (Craftsman miter saw), and bought used (most everything else).

I've had mixed luck with all but the first. The Grizzly table saw is awesome, capable of a degree of precision my previous 40 year old Craftsman (purchased used) was never capable of. The refurb miter saw is also awesome. No issues at all. The used band saw and drill press purchased off Craigslist are not so... The band saw is barely OK on a good day. The used drill press is usable but not quite OK, too much runout for precision work.

If you buy used you either have to be prepared to measure/test the tool or walk away. Refurb can be iffy. Factory refurb is great, dealer is so-so, local shop can be not so great. I was lucky, the local shop refurb brought it up to factory specs. Not always true.

The used bandsaw was an absolute POS when I bought it. Wrong blade, completely set up wrong, bad everything. But it's OK after several hours of work and a new set of blades. The used drill press is not so great. The runout of the spindle is excessive for precision work like large diameter forstner bit holes for euro-style hinges. I'm better off doing these hand-held. But the drill press makes a decent spindle sander, for which it gets used most often!

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post #8 of 15 Old 10-21-2017, 07:00 AM
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Welcome aboard. As stated above people buy tools form all imaginable sources.

As for telling you what you do not know. You are going to have to be specific. Hundreds of books have been written about what you do not know.

George
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post #9 of 15 Old 10-21-2017, 12:25 PM
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As a novice woodworker myself, I urge you to go to your public library and find books on woodworking. If your library is like mine, you will find lots of books on woodworking, including tools and how to use them. I have checked out and read about 50 books on woodworking in the last few months. Having read those books, I learned a lot more about hand tools, power tools, and many other important woodworking skills, techniques, etc.

First and foremost, learn about shop safety, including eye protection, hearing protection, and dust protection. Before you buy any tools, have those items on hand. Be sure you understand how to operate power tools in an absolutely safe manner before you use them. Power tools can injure you severely and they are not forgiving. The smallest lapse in judgement can hurt you badly. It happens so quickly that you cannot possibly react. If you are unable to operate power tools with perfect safety, then I suggest you consider a different interest.

One important lesson that I learned from the books was how much more I could have done with the tools I already had on hand. I could have done so much more with my basic 7 1/4 inch cordless circular saw. I don't regret buying the table saw, not for an instant, but the pressing need for a table saw was not as great as I originally thought at the time I bought it. I could have used the circular saw, if I had known more about how to setup and guide it.

Is there a woodworking club in your area? I recently joined one. Such clubs often have swap meets, auctions, and other ways to help people unload unwanted and surplus tools and acquire ones that they need. In addition, most of the club members are in their 70s and 80s. Some of them are aging out and retiring from woodworking (sad, but it happens). There are real bargains out there, if you know where to look.

I just picked up a variety of hand tools, jigs, and more from a 95 year old person who just retired from woodworking. Someone announced the sale at a meeting. I picked up a set of Crown chisels, a huge, beautiful box of Forstner bits, two hand planes, a Japanese handsaw, various jigs, some scrap wood, and much more for $200. It was a fair price, but still a bargain for me. The hand tools required considerable time and effort to restore them to "as new" condition. (... and I haven't finished working on the hand planes yet.)

That's another way that you can get quality tools: Pick up rusty junk for cheap and then restore it. You must first learn what to look for and especially what to reject. The local swap meet might be a good place to look for old tools.

If you are on a budget, you can trade time for money. Use hand tools or hand power tools instead of big expensive power tools. The smaller tools require more skill and practice. Often they leave you with more "cleanup" work. Big power tools can save huge amounts of time and offer greater precision, but a skilled craftsperson can do as well (often better!) with hand tools. Keep in mind that a skilled craftsperson can do much better with crappy tools compared with an unskilled amateur working with great tools. You may have to sharpen cheap hand tools more often (trading time for money), but they will do the job. When you're ready for better tools, you can sell off or give away the lower quality tools.

Remember that you will also need scrap wood for testing and practice and maybe to build jigs. You will need consumables - blades, bits, sandpaper, finishes, applicators (e.g. brushes), and maybe cleaning solutions. You will need tools to maintain your tools, such as a way to sharpen chisels, for example. I use several grades of diamond plates, an inexpensive Japanese water stone for final finishing, plus a honing jig.

You will also need some basic measurement tools. A decent combination square would be my first choice because it can do so much. After buying and returning one from Harbor Freight, I found a Starrett combination square on eBay for a very reasonable price. Whatever you buy, know how to test it. I have also found many uses for long rulers. I prefer a one meter combination inch/metric one. I have had one for many years, but they seem to be hard to find these days. I frequently use my basic 12x16 inch carpenter's square, too.

Some people like to have a project in mind, which will guide them regarding the tools that they will need first.

Start with the books. Even if you are not a "reader," just skimming them will give you many great ideas and help you learn about woodworking tools, safety, and techniques.

Good luck!

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 10-21-2017 at 12:40 PM.
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post #10 of 15 Old 10-22-2017, 04:32 AM
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My local PBS station ran New Yankee Workshop every morning at 6:30 in 2002 or so. Watching that taught me a lot. There are free videos here, plus The others that cost. http://www.newyankee.com/index.php?i...roduct=7916564
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post #11 of 15 Old 10-23-2017, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subroc View Post
A lifetime of experience in a forum question.

Buying tools can be simple or complex.

Some simple questions right back at you might be do you have any money?

Are you trying to put a functional shop together with a limited budget?

Do you want the best of everything now and are you willing to pay for it?

Do you have space to set up a real shop?

Enough space for shop tools or do you really need portable tools?

Is it your space or someone else space?

What are you planning on using the tools for?
I am new to woodworking as well. I've been buying hand tools on Craigslist and swamp meets. I got some hand planes on ebay and yard sales. There are tons of good tools there. I buy some tools like clamps at harbor freight. Bought new some good chisels and sharpening stones on Amazon. Power i am waiting for home Depot black Friday for some dewalt drills.

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post #12 of 15 Old 10-23-2017, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by intense21 View Post
I am new to woodworking as well. I've been buying hand tools on Craigslist and swamp meets. I got some hand planes on ebay and yard sales. There are tons of good tools there. I buy some tools like clamps at harbor freight. Bought new some good chisels and sharpening stones on Amazon. Power i am waiting for home Depot black Friday for some dewalt drills.

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Good post.

It should demonstrate to the OP one way (there are many) to start the process of putting a shop together and building a usable inventory of tools.
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post #13 of 15 Old 05-06-2018, 11:31 PM
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Where do you recommend to get tools ? Online, store,used,new,pros,cons,warranties,companies tool/retail and anything else you think a beginner should know ???
Depends as to your use. If your a hobby guy, harbor freight offers great value, but tools used occassionaly are accurate and will hold up. Harbor freight does not offer tools for tradesman that use tools every day and work then hard. I have both in my shop. For example, I've had 3\8" hammer drill I use maybe 3 x per year,. Have had it for 6 years and it shot the craps. Bought another one from harbor on sale for $19. I expect this will last another 5-6 years. I have a 3 hp 10 inch grizzly table saw - this in used daily and have had it for 10 years without any problems . You don't need the cream in all tools, just the ones you'll use all the time. Makes the $ go further. Tom

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post #14 of 15 Old 05-07-2018, 05:28 AM
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My policy has always been to buy the tool for the job. First tool was a simple power drill (inherited hand drill from my Dad).
Then a circular saw to match existing skirting with simple taper edge. Still have the circular saw after 50 years. However, my best buy was a workmate folding workbench.
Had alloy frame and cost $25. Used only yesterday and again 50 years old. For cutting iron piping when fitting kitchen bought an edge grinder. Cutting alloy section recently bought a Bosch jig saw.
No room for a table saw. Made a straight edge jig which I saw on forum and was able to make a cabinet with my circular saw.
My Dad only had hand tools. His grinder to sharpen was hand wound.
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post #15 of 15 Old 05-07-2018, 09:40 AM
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Depends on the size of your bank account. You might want to check out tool reviews especially for major equipment. New is always nice but many times when buying used you also get accessories.

Beyond the mainstays of your shop (like a good table saw etc) my advice is buy other tools as your projects dictate.

Cheers

THE GOOD NEWS: You create your own destiny...THE BAD NEWS: You create your own destiny
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