Bandsaw vs Tablesaw For My Needs - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
View Poll Results: Which tool for Endgrain Products?
Tablesaw 0 0%
Bandsaw 0 0%
Voters: 0. You may not vote on this poll

 10Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 25 Old 08-08-2020, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bermuda
Posts: 9
View automatedingenuities's Photo Album My Photos
Question Bandsaw vs Tablesaw For My Needs

Hello all, new member here.

I've been preparing over the past few months to take on a little venture of making end grain inlay cutting boards and end grain products in general. I have a 4x4 cnc router, planner, jointer, sliding compound mitre saw and track saw but now am in the midst of purchasing another fairly expensive tool and I want to choose the best tool for my needs.

I'm tossed up between if a tablesaw or a bandsaw meets my needs better. I'm familiar with using both tools so am not totally unaware of the capabilities of either, and it is a possibility of purchasing both in the long run, but I'm unsure if that's necessary as I want either the tablesaw or bandsaw to be very job specific.

For tablesaw I'd want to go exclusively with sawstop and am considering the 36" Contractor Saw with T Glide Fence. For bandsaw, I'm a bit more open to brands, but it will definitely be 14"-18" floor standing bandsaw (Rikon 10-342, or Grizzly G0513X2BF comes to mind).

I've listed my pros and cons of the two tools below and would like to hear any opinions which would be considered better suited for the task. As stated above I intend on making end grain products and alot of the final shaping will come from using the CNC. Keep in mind I've made due without the tablesaw or bandsaw thus far and am quite confident either tool will *not* be utilized outside of the ability to assist in making end grain products.

Tablesaw Pros:
Good dust collection
Quicker setup for rip and cross cuts
Ability to support wider material

Tablesaw Cons:
Blade kerf
Safety (Even though I'd prefer sawstop)
Shop space and maneuverability
No Resaw Ability

Bandsaw Pros:
Thinner Kerf (material savings)
Maneuverability of machine and less square footage of shop space
Quieter machine
Safer then tablesaw
Resaw Capability (good for inlays)

Bandsaw Cons:
Blade Tracking and possibility of not having 90 degree cuts if not set up correctly
Material hang off (possibility of making sliding table to counter this)
Dust collection not that great

Looking forward to reading your thoughts. Thanks for the assistance.
automatedingenuities is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 25 Old 08-09-2020, 07:14 PM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,010
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
welcome to the forum,
this is an open forum with all levels of skills and talents.
please feel free to join in the conversations that you find interesting
and ask questions to expand your skill levels and share what you know.
if you would like to know more about something, you can start a new thread.
we like to see photos of projects to share with others.
when addressing specific issues or concerns, sketches, drawings and photos
will get you the most accurate responses. (and we can all be on the same page).
when you get time, you can complete your profile through the "User CP"
with your location and whatever you want in your signature line (such as your
first name) that will show in all your posts.
looking forward to seeing some of your projects.

we would much rather see posts of: "How do I do this"
~ vs ~ "How can I FIX this" . . . .

hope you enjoy your stay.

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #3 of 25 Old 08-09-2020, 07:35 PM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,470
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
Tablesaw Pros:
Good dust collection


you'll get a diverging opinion group on that.


Tablesaw Cons:
Safety (Even though I'd prefer sawstop)

with as much experience as you allege, sawstop is an unnecessary doofangle.
No Resaw Ability
table saw have a limit to their cut depth, bandsaws have a limit to their re-saw width.
pick your limit based on your needs - 5,6,10" resaw pieces in end grain are an unusual need.


Bandsaw Pros:
Maneuverability of machine and less square footage of shop space
not true. the infeed/outfeed space requirements are essentially the same.


Safer then tablesaw
oh dear. I'm not at all in agreement with this one. people are a lot more prone to put flesh in the path of a bandsaw than a tablesaw.


Resaw Capability (good for inlays)
doing inlays on end grain stuff?
I've found a thickness planner to be the absolute end of all meows for making large stock pcs thin. carrier required.


Bandsaw Cons:
Blade Tracking and possibility of not having 90 degree cuts if not set up correctly

it is a basic required talent to know how to set up your tools. a band saw is zero different in any way.

Material hang off (possibility of making sliding table to counter this)
true - most band saws have smaller tables - and the solution is equally as simple as for a table saw or a radial saw or slide/compound miter saw.

Dust collection not that great
not necessarily. I put a collection pipe under the table with a oval hole to accommodate the blade.
yes, it does not get 100% - 95% perhaps.....
cynrich likes this.
TomCT2 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 25 Old 08-09-2020, 09:05 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: NE Wisconsin
Posts: 12
View GaryCK's Photo Album My Photos
My recommendation would be for the table saw as I believe it would be much easier to get reliably straight and repeatable cuts with it over the band saw. Having said that, the larger SawStop is a LOT of saw for just end grain work. It is a high-quality tool, though, that would serve you well.
GaryCK is offline  
post #5 of 25 Old 08-09-2020, 10:50 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,823
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Welcome to the forum! Add your first name to your signature line so we'll know what to call you and it will show in each post. Add your location in Bermuda to your profile, as well.

Table saw.

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, etc. whenever you're ready. What sort of woodworking are you planning or doing along with the end grain cutting boards?

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #6 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 02:27 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bermuda
Posts: 9
View automatedingenuities's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
Table saw.

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, etc. whenever you're ready. What sort of woodworking are you planning or doing along with the end grain cutting boards?

David
Thank you for the warm welcomes. I've added my initials to my signature if that's okay (I want to somewhat remain private).

I figure your thoughts are on table saw due to the 90 degree cuts and repeatability?

I do a bit of other woodworking but if I'm honest if I'm taking on this venture of end grain products I'd want to keep it to just that. I know some will say that I'm narrowing potential market or customer base but with that I can also increase quality through focus on the items I can potentially offer. I'd rather be the jack and master of this trade vs jack of all trades and master of none, if that makes any sense.

I'm actually in the midst of building some workbenches so things are a bit of a mess right now. Give me some time and I'll be sure to post some pictures of my workshop and some of the things I have made.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryCK View Post
My recommendation would be for the table saw as I believe it would be much easier to get reliably straight and repeatable cuts with it over the band saw. Having said that, the larger SawStop is a LOT of saw for just end grain work. It is a high-quality tool, though, that would serve you well.
Thanks For your reply. I totally agree the 36" contractor table saw with T Glide is overkill, but I'm only going off of what I've read from others experiences. Some say the jobsite model the fence is not accurate, and the similar thing is said about the 30" contractor model. With those two things it kind of pushes me to the 36" contractor with upgraded fence. Believe me this is much more saw then I want but without purchasing the tool and trying it out myself I can only look to users who have bought and tested it out previously.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
Tablesaw Pros:
Good dust collection


you'll get a diverging opinion group on that.


Tablesaw Cons:
Safety (Even though I'd prefer sawstop)

with as much experience as you allege, sawstop is an unnecessary doofangle.
No Resaw Ability
table saw have a limit to their cut depth, bandsaws have a limit to their re-saw width.
pick your limit based on your needs - 5,6,10" resaw pieces in end grain are an unusual need.


Bandsaw Pros:
Maneuverability of machine and less square footage of shop space
not true. the infeed/outfeed space requirements are essentially the same.


Safer then tablesaw
oh dear. I'm not at all in agreement with this one. people are a lot more prone to put flesh in the path of a bandsaw than a tablesaw.


Resaw Capability (good for inlays)
doing inlays on end grain stuff?
I've found a thickness planner to be the absolute end of all meows for making large stock pcs thin. carrier required.


Bandsaw Cons:
Blade Tracking and possibility of not having 90 degree cuts if not set up correctly

it is a basic required talent to know how to set up your tools. a band saw is zero different in any way.

Material hang off (possibility of making sliding table to counter this)
true - most band saws have smaller tables - and the solution is equally as simple as for a table saw or a radial saw or slide/compound miter saw.

Dust collection not that great
not necessarily. I put a collection pipe under the table with a oval hole to accommodate the blade.
yes, it does not get 100% - 95% perhaps.....
Thanks for picking through my thoughts on this, I appreciate your more experienced opinion.

My thoughts on sawstop is even the most experienced can get caught out so one more safety feature doesn't hurt and I only hear positive things about most models. I can see your viewpoint about people being more careless with a bandsaw and that is a safety consideration I will take into account.

I do have a thickness planner to make thicker boards thinner, but I was taking more into consideration if I wanted to do an inlay from a 2 inch thick board. If I don't do the same Endgrain for the inlay, I'd be wasting alot of material in board thickness for just a 1/4 inch inlay. I could be looking at this all wrong though.

NP
automatedingenuities is offline  
post #7 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 08:00 AM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,010
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
wow - Bermuda ??

we welcome members from all over the world.
don't think we have ever had a member here from Bermuda.
I was stationed in St.Davids at the Navy Base in the late '80s for 3 years.
the slow pace and the diversity of island life is extremely rewarding.
I was a volunteer at the College and also took a few classes there in marine science.

so NP, what do you do there besides woodworking ??

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #8 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 10:19 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 3,029
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
I have a SawStop cabinet saw and an old Delta bandsaw that I like very much. I will not vote in your poll. The choice is too personal, and there is not enough information. Here are a few considerations that may help:

Safety:

I would not consider a bandsaw to be safer than a table saw. The dangers are different, but an injury from either tool can be very serious. When I bought my bandsaw, the club's "bandsaw mentor" came over to help me check it out, set it up, and give me tips. He reminded me that bandsaws got their start in the meat industry, and he commented, "Bandsaws want to get back to their roots, so they try to go after your flesh." It may be a facetious aphorism, but I think about it every time I turn on that bandsaw.

(By the way, the most recent injury in our woodworking club happened last week, when a very experienced member cut an inch off his thumb on a bandsaw. The bandsaw blade pulled his thumb in, making it worse.)

Storage Footprint and Maneuverability:

You seem concerned about "shop space and maneuverability." For me, a major factor in choosing the SawStop cabinet saw over the SawStop contractor saw is that the cabinet saw storage footprint is less. That's because the contractor saw has a big motor sticking out the back. Here is a useful link comparing features of the two saws:
https://www.trentdavis.net/wp/2019/0...-professional/

A bandsaw has a very small footprint compared with a table saw. That's good when you consider storage space. Between the table saw and the bandsaw, the bandsaw is much scarier to move around. That's because it is both heavy and top heavy over that small footprint. I am very cautious to maintain strong "tip control" over the bandsaw when I move it, because it can become unstable when rolling over the smallest crack. In contrast, the table saw is low and stable when moved.

Changing Blades:

Changing blades on a table saw is quick and easy. If you use a general purpose or combination blade as many people do, you may not switch blades often. Even if you use dedicated rip blades and crosscut blades, changing them does not take long.

Changing blades on a bandsaw takes much longer. There is an alignment process that must be done for each blade - blade position on the tire, tension, thrust bearings, guide blocks or bearings, etc. You may need to change bandsaw blades more often, too. See "Blade Types", below.

Blade Types:

You can buy a general purpose or combination blade for your table saw and use it for everything. Sure, it is a compromise compared with dedicated rip and combination blades, but that compromise still yields a very high quality cut.

(I have three different general purpose blades. One is used most of the time. One is reserved for special projects where I want the cleanest, best cuts. One is a thin kerf, and it also has a raker tooth for leaving flat non-through cuts. Another reason for multiple blades is that I assume that one may be out for resharpening.)

There is no real "general purpose" blade for a bandsaw. You will want or need a variety of blades, depending on the wood thickness and the kind of cut you will make. If you are cutting thin wood, you want more teeth per inch (TPI). If you are cutting thick wood, you will want fewer TPI. If you are cutting tight curves, you will want a narrow blade. If you are cutting wide curves or making straight cuts, you may prefer a wider blade. If you are resawing a board, you will want the widest blade that your bandsaw supports. I didn't go out and count, but I bet I have a dozen bandsaw blades.

Cut Quality and Blade Durability:

Table saws have long lasting blades with carbide tips that make very clean, straight cuts. Saw marks from table saw blades vary from invisible to very fine, and they are easy to clean up. The better quality table saw blades have thick carbide tips that are worth resharpening multiple times. A good blade sharpener returns your blade in like new condition.

Most bandsaw blades do not have carbide tips. Generally speaking, bandsaw blades are relatively inexpensive and are not resharpened. They are not durable compared with table saw blades and occasionally break during use. (Remember, the steel band flexes all the time as it passes over the wheels.)

Bandsaw blades have a "set" in the teeth that leaves more prominent saw marks - a lot of vertical lines in the wood. When I use the bandsaw, I expect another processing step to remove the saw marks. Sometimes it can be a real hassle, especially if you are trying to remove bandsaw marks from narrow curve cuts in thick wood.

You can buy bandsaw blades with carbide teeth or carbide tips. I do not own one. They are expensive, but they can be resharpened. I have been told that they leave a much cleaner cut compared with standard bandsaw blades. They are commonly sold as resaw blades, but some are useful for straight cuts. They might be worth the cost if you lack a table saw or do a lot of resawing. They are especially good for very thin resaws - veneers.

Not Mentioned in your Pros and Cons Lists:

* Table saws can be used with dado stacks to make dados, rabbets, and box joints.
* Table saws can be used for resawing, but are limited to the height of the blade. Even if you use a thin kerf blade, you will lose much more wood than a bandsaw. When you resaw with a table saw, you must take precautions to handle the wood safely.
* Bandsaws may have a small footprint, but they still require space and material support for larger cuts, like rip cutting a board.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 08-10-2020 at 10:25 AM.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #9 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 10:48 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: NE FL
Posts: 718
View DrRobert's Photo Album My Photos
Was there a question in there?

I have the Rikon 10-342. Good heavy duty machine. Resaw capacity not real high. The motor went bad after about 10yrs.

If I were making a living making cutting boards, I would want a drum sander.

Robert
DrRobert is offline  
post #10 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 10:59 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,591
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Bandsaws do not kickback .....

toolagnostic

You said:
Safety:
I would not consider a bandsaw to be safer than a table saw. The dangers are different, but an injury from either tool can be very serious. When I bought my bandsaw, the club's "bandsaw mentor" came over to help me check it out, set it up, and give me tips. He reminded me that bandsaws got their start in the meat industry, and he commented, "Bandsaws want to get back to their roots, so they try to go after your flesh." It may be a facetious aphorism, but I think about it every time I turn on that bandsaw.

(By the way, the most recent injury in our woodworking club happened last week, when a very experienced member cut an inch off his thumb on a bandsaw. The bandsaw blade pulled his thumb in, making it worse.)

So Yes, in that way they are safer. However, there is more blade "exposed" before and after the cut than on a table saw AND the wheels will take a long time to stop spinning unless there is a foot brake or electronic motor brake..

The first rule of table saws and bandsaws and most other powered machine tools is start with a flat piece on the table! No warped or twisted pieces will be safe to cut. Next, use only a straight edge to register on the fence, especially on the table saw.

A bandsaw is more forgiving during the cutting operation in that the blade is only about 3/8" to 3/4" wide as opposed to 8" of exposed table saw blade. This means you CAN twist the workpiece during the cut on a bandsaw, BUT not on a table saw or you will get a kickback.
The bandsaw blade is pulling the workpiece down into the insert plate on the table, so small pieces may be difficult to hold on to if they are not well supported on the flat table top. A Jorgeson clamp is really handy for those.

It's always about the physics of the cutting process when it comes to understanding how the machine will react to the material and it's support and position. Just like handsawing a 6" length from the end of a 2" X 4" while is resting on your knee won't go real well. The tables or bases on the machine resist the forces during the cutting operation, routers being the exception because their cutters are at 90 degrees to the base or the table. But still, the workpiece should be as flat as possible to provide even support.

If I could only have one powered machine in my shop it would definitely be the bandsaw. My "problem" is I have 5 of them ...... I didn't know when to quit.
cynrich likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-10-2020 at 12:42 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #11 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 12:01 PM
Member
 
Bernie_72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Hubertus, Wisconsin
Posts: 74
View Bernie_72's Photo Album My Photos
As others have mentioned this is personal choice and ultimately you know best how you work and what your needs are. That being said I'd offer the following comments.

My first recommendation is that if you have budget for the $1,899 SawStop contractors saw you could actually afford to get both a good table saw and a good bandsaw if you were willing to switch brands. I picked up a new Grizzly G0513X2 2HP 17" bandsaw back in April of this year and had it shipped to my house for under $1,000. I just waited for a sale where the unit was discounted a bit and had free shipping (Grizzly does this often). On top of that sale I found that a discount code (DARBIN10) that still worked from a YouTube review that Darbin Orvar did back in early 2019. Combine that with a nice Grizzly hybrid or cabinet table saw and I think you could have both shipped to your front door for under $2,000...although given that you live in Bermuda shipping might be a touch more than what I pay for delivery to Wisconsin! :)

I'm a big fan of Grizzly equipment. From what I understand their equipment is made in the same factory as Shop Fox, Jet, Rikon & Powermatic equipment and their prices are always lower. I recently did some refurbishing and upgrades to a 15 year old Grizzly planer and my dad's old Rikon jointer. When I was ordering replacement parts and Grizzly was out of stock on certain items I was able to get Jet or Powermatic parts from identical models. My G1021ZX2 planer is almost identical to the Powermatic HH15 but costs $1,200 less.

I understand the desire to have SawStop's safety feature and if that's something you're set on then based on the other information you've shared I'd probably recommend going with a bandsaw purchase now. You mentioned that you already have a track saw. If the one you have is accurate it can handle most of what a table saw can do and produce good results. The flexibility you get from the bandsaw sounds like it would add some capabilities to your shop that you don't currently have.

As to your concerns about material hang off with the band saw I think you're on the right track with a sliding table. I have my cabinet saw to the right of my table slide and I have my bandsaw and a router table in-line off to the left of my table slide. With that configuration I can easily make cuts on my bandsaw because I have great support to the right and at the end of the bandsaw. Although my L shaped power equipment "island" takes up a lot of space I built it all on wheels and it can be moved around if needed.

Good luck with your decision and upcoming purchase!

Last edited by Bernie_72; 08-10-2020 at 12:08 PM. Reason: Spelling
Bernie_72 is offline  
post #12 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bermuda
Posts: 9
View automatedingenuities's Photo Album My Photos
You guys have given me quite a bit to think about, and I'm still quite a bit undecided but am leaning towards a bandsaw.

I know one of the things I mentioned is safety with a tablesaw, and I agree I can purchase both a tablesaw and a bandsaw for the price of the sawstop but full disclosure, I've experienced kick back, and to say the least I think it left me traumatized a bit. I haven't touched a tablesaw since. The kickback gripped one of my fingers, opening up a pretty deep cut. It's hard for me to put that behind me without the "safety" of the sawstop, although I know that sawstop does not stop kickback but it protects your digits from being cut off. Having said all that I agree a bandsaw can be just as dangerous but perhaps in my mind I feel a bandsaw is safer because I have not experienced any dangers with one.

I think one of the other things preventing me from getting both machines is space. I have the space for one but not for both. I work in a shared space 25x60 feet, of which i have 15x25 feet and I don't do just woodworking. I get my hands in metalworking, motor mechanics etc. As of right now I got a 5x5 CNC router which is in a dust enclosure, a small benchtop CNC milling machine, and a benchtop CNC lathe. I also have two manual milling machines, that I am planning to convert to CNC. In the attached picture you can see my workshop layout, (real pictures I will post once I do some cleaning up, still in the maneuvering stages for some of my equipment). I'm trying to fit woodworking, and metal working all in that 15x25 foot space, and also trying to narrow down what I want to create.

I'm going to be honest with you, when I built my CNC router, I built it as a hobby. The joy to me was building something I read on the internet. I have rebuilt the CNC router twice since then. I got into metalworking because I needed a mill and lathe to build parts for the CNC router. Now I am done with all this rebuilding, I want to actually create stuff with my CNC router and eventually my CNC mill and lathe too, that's what brings me here to wanting to create end grain products, as it challenges me and helps give my hobby purpose.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Workshop Layout With Woodworking Section .jpg
Views:	11
Size:	130.9 KB
ID:	393651  


NP
automatedingenuities is offline  
post #13 of 25 Old 08-10-2020, 10:25 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,823
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Show us some photos of your CNC and shop, please. We do like photos!

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #14 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 03:38 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bermuda
Posts: 9
View automatedingenuities's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
Show us some photos of your CNC and shop, please. We do like photos!

David
Because you asked... I still have quite a bit of cleaning up to do. My CNC mill and lathe I have to build the drawers and finish the enclosures. My CNC router I want to remove the drywall and make bifold doors. Always something else to do.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20200811_125650.jpg
Views:	12
Size:	411.7 KB
ID:	393671  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20200811_124659.jpg
Views:	13
Size:	368.3 KB
ID:	393673  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20200811_124631.jpg
Views:	11
Size:	426.5 KB
ID:	393675  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20200811_124622.jpg
Views:	12
Size:	318.4 KB
ID:	393677  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20200414_195214.jpg
Views:	12
Size:	448.3 KB
ID:	393685  

difalkner likes this.

NP
automatedingenuities is offline  
post #15 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 03:51 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,823
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
How do you like the mill? I've come so close to getting one of those several times but just haven't yet. Looks like a nice shop, to me!

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #16 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 03:54 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,823
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Btw, we have a sister forum with far higher CNC participation if you'd like to join us there - Router Forums. You should have no problem getting the same user name at Router Forums.

Don't leave here, though! There are plenty of folks who would like to see what you're doing to your shop, what you're building, etc.

David
John Smith_inFL likes this.

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #17 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 04:23 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bermuda
Posts: 9
View automatedingenuities's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
Btw, we have a sister forum with far higher CNC participation if you'd like to join us there - Router Forums. You should have no problem getting the same user name at Router Forums.

Don't leave here, though! There are plenty of folks who would like to see what you're doing to your shop, what you're building, etc.

David
Ohh, nice, I'll sign up there too. Really have not built much to be honest. Made a rocking chair the other day out of 3/4" Birch ply. Came out okay but its quite a bit I would change if I were to do it again. I think once I get either the bandsaw or tablesaw, it will open up me using the CNC router much more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
How do you like the mill? I've come so close to getting one of those several times but just haven't yet. Looks like a nice shop, to me!

David
Thanks about the shop, I keep moving things around trying to find a way to fit both a woodworking and metalworking shop in one space.

Which mill do you speak of the PM-940 or the G0704?

NP

Last edited by automatedingenuities; 08-11-2020 at 04:28 PM.
automatedingenuities is offline  
post #18 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 05:12 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,823
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Ah, just noticed the larger one in the background! I'd love to have one that size but all I could ever fit in would be like the benchtop Grizzly. I even thought about one of the combo lathe mill because I have needed a lathe as much as I do a milling machine.

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #19 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 06:38 PM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,470
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
you've mentioned "end grain products" several times - getting a smooth flat surface on end grain glue-ups does not qualify as falling off the log.
I have a table saw and a bandsaw - for making smooth square cuts, the bandsaw would not be my first choice. using a sled and good fixturing/support, you'll get square, but not so smooth. sanding end grain smooth - especially hard species - is a bear.


you'll have an advantage with your CNC router set-ups - but if this is for a money making effort, making more work/steps than necessary usually drives up the costs/time.
TomCT2 is offline  
post #20 of 25 Old 08-11-2020, 06:45 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bermuda
Posts: 9
View automatedingenuities's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
Ah, just noticed the larger one in the background! I'd love to have one that size but all I could ever fit in would be like the benchtop Grizzly. I even thought about one of the combo lathe mill because I have needed a lathe as much as I do a milling machine.

David
If you do go for one, check out precision matthews PM-25MV, its got a variable speed motor and a belt drive so one less thing you will want to change, and its some people out there that make kits if you interested in CNC'ing one. Arizonacnckits is one place that comes to mind for conversions.

Combo machines are a sacrifice in my opinion.
difalkner likes this.

NP
automatedingenuities is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome