Badly broken center granite top, Steel City T.S. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 01:05 AM Thread Starter
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Badly broken center granite top, Steel City T.S.

OK, this is only my second table saw purchase (don't ask about the first, lol). The fb classified ad claimed that the broken center granite section had been "professionally vacuum bag epoxied" . Well after borrowing a pickup and driving almost two hours to purchase it, I was not impressed. However the rest of the saw looked in really great condition, someone had just dropped that heavy center section. The repair job was really bad but after driving that far in a borrowed pu, I got him to reduce the price by $50 and took it home (I don't remember how much I did pay him).

Now, I am not sure what to do with it. I have not been able to locate replacement granite sections at all. That section was NEVER epoxied at all but looks like someone just used a filler and later either broke another piece off of just missed that crack. The section would easily fall into four or five pieces if I removed it and it's not even flat!! I would gladly replace that section (or the whole top) with iron if that were available. To take that section to a stone cutter and have them machine that relatively complicated piece would cost more than a new table saw.

Any and all suggestions are welcome. I KNOW that I shouldn't have purchased it but that boat left long ago. I just want a decent hobby table saw (I'm not a cabinet maker, lol) and I'm not ready to toss this one away.
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post #2 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 04:34 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Probably not fixable .....so

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedSonja View Post
OK, this is only my second table saw purchase (don't ask about the first, lol). The fb classified ad claimed that the broken center granite section had been "professionally vacuum bag epoxied" . Well after borrowing a pickup and driving almost two hours to purchase it, I was not impressed. However the rest of the saw looked in really great condition, someone had just dropped that heavy center section. The repair job was really bad but after driving that far in a borrowed pu, I got him to reduce the price by $50 and took it home (I don't remember how much I did pay him).

Now, I am not sure what to do with it. I have not been able to locate replacement granite sections at all. That section was NEVER epoxied at all but looks like someone just used a filler and later either broke another piece off of just missed that crack. The section would easily fall into four or five pieces if I removed it and it's not even flat!! I would gladly replace that section (or the whole top) with iron if that were available. To take that section to a stone cutter and have them machine that relatively complicated piece would cost more than a new table saw.

Any and all suggestions are welcome. I KNOW that I shouldn't have purchased it but that boat left long ago. I just want a decent hobby table saw (I'm not a cabinet maker, lol) and I'm not ready to toss this one away.

Rather than give up, I would make a top from high density particle board with a HLP surface like used on countertops. In fact a cabinet shop may have some scraps. Duplicating the openings will require a paper template made off the existing top. Tracing and rubbings with a large crayon will help. Graphite sticks work well from the art store. You will probably need a router for the openings and recesses. If this is beyond your skill set, then there's another solution.


Remove all the pieces and lay them out on a sheet of 3/4" plywood larger than required. Sticky tape or hot glue them in place just like they were on the table saw. Take the whole mess to a marble or granite fabrication shop that makes countertops and see what they would charge to water jet an new top. If marble is too expensive, then go to a wood cabinet shop and see what they would charge. They can CNC rout in all the slots and openings after they laser trace it and computerize the data.


Typically, table saw tops are secured to the cabinet with threaded bosses and bolts up from underneath. There are metal threaded inserts that will work in the same manner, call woodserts.
http://classcorders.mscdirect.com/Pa...BDNA&pid=35651


It's a big project for someone with limited skills and a minimum of tools, but still doable.

A final thought is to repurpose an existing cast iron top from a Craftsman or Rigid table saw. The bolt holes in the cabinet can be relocated to fit the Craftsman top quite easily.There are quite a few on Ebay:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...+top+table+saw
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Last edited by woodnthings; 02-14-2020 at 06:02 AM.
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post #3 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 09:30 AM
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You need to start by taking it apart.

It might be possible to epoxy that back together, but realize that the top will not be as strong, you will need to add something on the bottom side across the cracks to reinforce the top.

I've "glued" a lot of stone together, in some instances I will use mesh on the back when it isn't something that will be under stress. In others you need to use something thicker, plywood of different thickness will work.

You still have the issue of getting the top flat, that will be more difficult.

I know you probably know this now, but sometimes there are things you should walk away from, this one I would have walked on.

Here is a pic of some travertine I glued together, it's obviously set in place, so only needed mesh on the back to hold it.
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post #4 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 11:10 AM
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if i couldn't get a replacement top from the mfr at a reasnoable cost, i'd sell it and buy another saw! lesson learned.

and i would not recommend using thaat one if the wood will get snagged on the broken edges.
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post #5 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 01:57 PM
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You may be able to pick up a kitchen MDF worktop from a kitchen installer. They are about 2" thick and very heavy. If the top is covered in melamine, then this will give a smooth surface.
Companies sell engineered granite tops to cover and these are hard and very smooth.
Granite Transformations is one company.
Perhaps you could glue the existing top and then have a top put on it.
Me, I would use an MDF top taken out of a kitchen being refurbished.
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post #6 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 03:39 PM
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If it were me .......

I posted about repurposing an existing table saw top from a Craftsman saw.

Here's one on Ebay very reasonable:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Craftsman-K...ry!48370!US!-1




You would have to see what your's looks like without the marble top. It's trashed anyway, so do as I suggested and secure the pieces flat side down to a plywood piece for comparison. The photo above is the underside and you will be able to compare your underside if done as I suggest. Note the "bosses" that are threaded for the cabinet bolts.

If your saw's trunnions are mounted to the cabinet, then all you'd need to do is locate new holes for this top and drill them out after properly locating it over the blade. It's worth a try.


If you lived closer, I would be happy to assist you with this. There may be a member who is closer to you that would help... I donno?


I have a spare table from my table saw collection, but shipping is outrageous.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-14-2020 at 03:43 PM.
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post #7 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 04:45 PM
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If this is a cabinet saw with the trunnions fastened to the cabinet I would seriously consider Woodnthings suggestion of finding a steel top. As they say in the house renovation business, it has good bones so would be worth the effort.
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post #8 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 09:50 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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The trunnions are cabinet mounted ....maybe?

I found this image of the cabinet without a top showing the trunnions mounted to the cabinet. That means..... a different top could possibly be used in place of the OEM marble top.


https://youtu.be/Ie_kt9iV6Xg?t=99





http://www.palatablewoodworking.com/..._top_08-r.html
Also shown here:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

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post #9 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 10:03 PM
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Steel City is still in business in Canada. I expect someone bought the name and rights to the equipment lines, but I really don’t know the details. You may be able to order a replacement granite part from them. If you don’t have the manual with the parts diagram in the back, a web search will locate a pdf version. The part numbers are all listed in the manual.

Also, some of their table saws were available in both iron and granite tops. The model numbers were the same with the last character of the model number being “G” for granite and .... maybe “C” for cast.

Edit: I found their website. It’s steelcitymachines.ca. Note - it’s in French.
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post #10 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 10:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your help. It's been too cold here (teens) to spend much time in my garage which isn't yet totally insulated or heated (coming). Saturday and Sunday are to be in the low 40's so may go out and try to remove that center section. However, I am going back to California on Tuesday till March 31. I stay with a good friend there and need to finish up some business and visit some other friends.

When I return in April, hopefully it's warmer here and I will try to fix that top. I do have a router and bits and know how to use it so will probably go the counter top route first. Will just need to assure that will be level with the side sections (i think there is some adjustment available).
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post #11 of 20 Old 02-15-2020, 12:49 AM
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I understand you plan on using a counter top. I’m adding this to the thread in case it will help members in the future searching for Steel City information.

Normand in Canada sells Steel City equipment and currently has a Granite table saw listed in the liquidation section of their Website. “10" Granite Table Saw Steel City 45975G-52“

If Steel City was recently or is still manufacturing the granite top saws, I’d expect replacement parts are available.
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post #12 of 20 Old 02-15-2020, 01:44 AM
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Taking into account the time, effort, travelling costs and parts costs of trying to repair that machine.....
Sell it on for spares and buy one of these.
https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW745-.../dp/B000HXT2N6

Its sold as a contractors saw but I can make anything I want on mine.

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post #13 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 12:14 PM
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I have a Steel City 3 hp cabinet saw with the cast iron top. It's a great saw and works well. The granite tops to me weren't nothing more than a sales gimmick. If you can get a cast iron top in place of the granite, go ahead. If not, I'd drop it off at the recycle center. I also have to agree with SunnyBob. I have a dewalt 745 jobsite saw and for its size, it doesn't a great job also.
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post #14 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 03:44 PM
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Granite top - why put a brittle item on workshop tool?

Retired engineer-bureaucrat in Oakland, CA
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post #15 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 05:24 PM
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This is all very subjective, if you have the tools and the talent a very serviceable saw could be put together by sourcing a few parts, on the other hand in some cases it may be better to just buy another complete saw.

For several years I had a drill press that began as a stand for an electric drill and over time morphed into a motor driven unit, probably better than most of the small cheap machines on the market. However I had a lathe and a welder at the time to make up parts.

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post #16 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 06:03 PM
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This what she said .............

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedSonja View Post
OK, this is only my second table saw purchase (don't ask about the first, lol). The fb classified ad claimed that the broken center granite section had been "professionally vacuum bag epoxied" . Well after borrowing a pickup and driving almost two hours to purchase it, I was not impressed. However the rest of the saw looked in really great condition, someone had just dropped that heavy center section. The repair job was really bad but after driving that far in a borrowed pu, I got him to reduce the price by $50 and took it home (I don't remember how much I did pay him).

Now, I am not sure what to do with it. I have not been able to locate replacement granite sections at all. That section was NEVER epoxied at all but looks like someone just used a filler and later either broke another piece off of just missed that crack. The section would easily fall into four or five pieces if I removed it and it's not even flat!! I would gladly replace that section (or the whole top) with iron if that were available. To take that section to a stone cutter and have them machine that relatively complicated piece would cost more than a new table saw.

Any and all suggestions are welcome. I KNOW that I shouldn't have purchased it but that boat left long ago. I just want a decent hobby table saw (I'm not a cabinet maker, lol) and I'm not ready to toss this one away.

It's her call .... sell it, ditch it, donate it, OR fix it. No skills and no tools, would fall into the first 3 categories. Reasonable skills OR a skilled friend to help, then fix it IF parts are available. New parts, used or repurposed parts .... what ever. If it's me, I'm fixin' it. Yep, when they first came out, I thought it was about the dumbest idea I had heard regarding power tools. If it CAN break, it WILL break, and now we have proof.


So far we have no clue what she wants to do.......

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #17 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
It's her call .... sell it, ditch it, donate it, OR fix it. No skills and no tools, would fall into the first 3 categories. Reasonable skills OR a skilled friend to help, then fix it IF parts are available. New parts, used or repurposed parts .... what ever. If it's me, I'm fixin' it. Yep, when they first came out, I thought it was about the dumbest idea I had heard regarding power tools. If it CAN break, it WILL break, and now we have proof.


So far we have no clue what she wants to do.......

"Yep, when they first came out, I thought it was about the dumbest idea I had heard regarding power tools. If it CAN break, it WILL break, and now we have proof."


My thought exactly when I first heard/saw one. I am sure that there have been many more broken.


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post #18 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 11:02 PM
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While reading through this thread I had a few of ideas.

Go to a shop that makes granite counter tops. See if they could make one for you. You may have to bring the existing granite top with you. Don't hold your breath about getting "T" track miter slots but 3/4 by 3/8 miter slots are possible.

Finding a cast iron table that can be re-purposed is very good suggestion.

Finding a machine shop that could machine a 1/2 inch piece of steel into a top might work.

All that being said and considering the costs of everything, if you have a boat the saw make a good mooring weight.
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post #19 of 20 Old 02-17-2020, 12:21 PM
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Can you make from Corian counter? If not thick enough, glue two together? Cut with woodworking tools like table saw, bandsaw, scrollsaw, and router to make shape and inside of insert hole. Cut miter slots with router. Maybe use threaded inserts under bottom.? Corian melts and heat from tools is bad so be careful.
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post #20 of 20 Old 02-21-2020, 12:54 AM
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Every comment in this thread is spot-on.

I’ll add mine, as I have made a number of replacement tabletops for power tools: Radial arm saws. The basic process, emphasis on MOST BASIC, would be the same and I suggest you check out the DelphiForums blog for radial arm saws in order to learn how to produce a worthy, flat and true top. But understand that those tops are simple rectangles, there are no pairs of miter slots, nor a precise cutout for a blade insert. These tops are made from a double layer of MDF or Baltic Birch plywood.

Having made several RAS tops from various solutions, I will share that it is incredibly easy to botch it. What happens when the job gets botched? You are forever doomed to have imperfect cuts, imperfect joints, imperfect glue-ups, etc. Every single stick that is cut will be off just enough to prevent things from working right and sometimes they even won’t be able to be assembled...expensive wood wasted again and going in the trash. Yep, sad, sad story.

Given that there are scores of table saws continually available on Craigslist for not too much cash, how much is your time worth to you? Realistically, since this is your first tabletop fabrication, an honest estimation of the time you’ll probably need to complete a proper top would be in excess of 20 hours. If you pay yourself $15/hr, that works out to $300...if you get it just right on the first effort. For $400-$500 you can start getting quality cuts within a couple of tuning hours, no surprises.

You are the proud owner of what’s known as a “basket case,” I wouldn’t get too emotionally attached to it since there are so many other equivalent or better saws out there for not a lot of dough. Cut it loose.
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