Aluminum Auxiliary Rip Fence - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
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Aluminum Auxiliary Rip Fence

My new to me Craftsman 22114 table saw came with an aluminum auxiliary rip fence that slides along the main fence and can be locked down. I have used homemade sacrificial fences on other saws but what is the purpose of this one?
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post #2 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 10:33 PM
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Extending the fence beyond the front of the saw can be helpful when ripping things like full sheets of plywood, gives some extra support area to brace the sheet against
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post #3 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 04:24 AM
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My old jobsite table saw had a very short lead-in distance between the front of the table and the blade.

The lead-in distance on most jobsite table saws is only six inches. The rip fence distance in front of the blade is correspondingly short. It is difficult to keep long workpieces aligned with the rip fence as you start the cut. You have only a small front right corner of your board to align that long rip cut.

My solution was a long board of 3/4 inch baltic birch that extended forward. It served as an auxiliary fence to give me a longer, extended face to help align the start of those difficult rip cuts. I drilled the top of the baltic birch auxiliary fence and used the Rockler "universal fence clamps" to clamp it to the table saw's rip fence:
https://www.rockler.com/universal-fence-clamps

One of the things that I appreciate most about contractor and cabinet table saws over jobsite saws is the longer lead-in distance (and matching rip fences). It makes a big difference. When I owned the jobsite saw, the longer auxiliary fence helped.
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 06:57 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Extending the fence beyond the front of the saw can be helpful when ripping things like full sheets of plywood, gives some extra support area to brace the sheet against
Wouldn't the plywood in your example twist toward the regular fence once it passed the end of the auxiliary fence?
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post #5 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
Wouldn't the plywood in your example twist toward the regular fence once it passed the end of the auxiliary fence?
Where does the back of the extended auxiliary fence end? Is it still behind the center of the blade?
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 04:35 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
Wouldn't the plywood in your example twist toward the regular fence once it passed the end of the auxiliary fence?
Where does the back of the extended auxiliary fence end? Is it still behind the center of the blade?
The auxiliary fence that comes with the saw is the same length at the regular rip fence but it can slide in a t type track that runs length the length of the fence. The only time it is mentioned operationally in the manual is to be used as a cut off stop but I don't understand how.
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post #7 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
The auxiliary fence that comes with the saw is the same length at the regular rip fence but it can slide in a t type track that runs length the length of the fence. The only time it is mentioned operationally in the manual is to be used as a cut off stop but I don't understand how.
Oh! That's different. That would be for crosscuts.

In that case, you bring the auxiliary fence far forward, so that the back of the auxiliary fence is in front of the blade.

Use the miter gauge. Set the auxiliary fence so that the crosscut will yield the desired length on the auxiliary fence side of the board.

Make the crosscut, holding the board in your hand with the miter gauge. Your workpiece is beyond the back of the auxiliary fence when it reaches the blade. There is little chance of a kickback, because the wood cannot be pinched between the blade and the real rip fence behind the auxiliary fence.

Bring the miter gauge back. Shift the workpiece to the right and repeat as many times as you want to make identical crosscut "cutoffs."

I have done the same thing with a block of wood clamped to the rip fence in front of the blade. Once the workpiece reaches the blade, the rip fence can't pinch the wood. The photo in this article illustrates the principle:
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2020...scuts-and-more

-> My question for you is: Does your auxiliary fence leave enough gap behind it (to the rip fence) to work that way comfortably?
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post #8 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 05:36 PM
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Using a cutoff stop .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
The auxiliary fence that comes with the saw is the same length at the regular rip fence but it can slide in a t type track that runs length the length of the fence. The only time it is mentioned operationally in the manual is to be used as a cut off stop but I don't understand how.

The stop should be a small block, 1" X 3" X 3" or so, but it should be attached to the sliding fence with double stick tape.
Now you can slide it to where it's in the front of the blade so your workpiece/cutoff doesn't get bound up between the blade and the fence and kickback at you. You will get the same result without the sliding fence if you wanted, just follow the same rule. Personally, I wouldn't fret over how or when to use the sliding fence as I've not occasion to use one for 50 years. My Delta Unifence does slide but it rarely changes it's location, if ever.



I have the big brother to your Craftsman saw, a 22124 with the full cabinet, and it's a great saw. Mine came with a Biesemeyer fence, the workhorse of table saw fences. Enjoy your new saw and be safe, use the riiving knife for all rips to help prevent kickbacks.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-16-2020 at 05:49 PM.
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post #9 of 11 Old 09-16-2020, 07:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
The auxiliary fence that comes with the saw is the same length at the regular rip fence but it can slide in a t type track that runs length the length of the fence. The only time it is mentioned operationally in the manual is to be used as a cut off stop but I don't understand how.
Oh! That's different. That would be for crosscuts.

In that case, you bring the auxiliary fence far forward, so that the back of the auxiliary fence is in front of the blade.

Use the miter gauge. Set the auxiliary fence so that the crosscut will yield the desired length on the auxiliary fence side of the board.

Make the crosscut, holding the board in your hand with the miter gauge. Your workpiece is beyond the back of the auxiliary fence when it reaches the blade. There is little chance of a kickback, because the wood cannot be pinched between the blade and the real rip fence behind the auxiliary fence.

Bring the miter gauge back. Shift the workpiece to the right and repeat as many times as you want to make identical crosscut "cutoffs."

I have done the same thing with a block of wood clamped to the rip fence in front of the blade. Once the workpiece reaches the blade, the rip fence can't pinch the wood. The photo in this article illustrates the principle:
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2020...scuts-and-more

-> My question for you is: Does your auxiliary fence leave enough gap behind it (to the rip fence) to work that way comfortably?
I believe so. Thanks for this great information.
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post #10 of 11 Old 09-17-2020, 09:45 AM
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I don't think thats correct .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Oh! That's different. That would be for crosscuts.

In that case, you bring the auxiliary fence far forward, so that the back of the auxiliary fence is in front of the blade.

Use the miter gauge. Set the auxiliary fence so that the crosscut will yield the desired length on the auxiliary fence side of the board.

Make the crosscut, holding the board in your hand with the miter gauge. Your workpiece is beyond the back of the auxiliary fence when it reaches the blade. There is little chance of a kickback, because the wood cannot be pinched between the blade and the real rip fence behind the auxiliary fence.

Bring the miter gauge back. Shift the workpiece to the right and repeat as many times as you want to make identical crosscut "cutoffs."

I have done the same thing with a block of wood clamped to the rip fence in front of the blade. Once the workpiece reaches the blade, the rip fence can't pinch the wood. The photo in this article illustrates the principle:
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2020...scuts-and-more

-> My question for you is: Does your auxiliary fence leave enough gap behind it (to the rip fence) to work that way comfortably?

This seems like way too much "overkill" to me. A simple block clamped or sticky taped to the primary fence is all you need. Having the sliding fence extended all the way towards the forward past the front of the blade is not the way I would do it... to much in the way out in front of the table, so easily bumped out of alignment or causing a below the belt injury ......



The other way for shorter length multiple crosscuts is ab extended face on the miter gauge as the more expensive miter gauges have for this purpose:




Or, as I do, just use a 1 X 3" about 24" long and screw to to my mitergauge:



As I said previously I see no real use for this auxillary sliding fence, but if you have to "invent" ways to use it that's up to you.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-17-2020 at 09:58 AM.
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post #11 of 11 Old 09-17-2020, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
The auxiliary fence that comes with the saw is the same length at the regular rip fence but it can slide in a t type track that runs length the length of the fence. The only time it is mentioned operationally in the manual is to be used as a cut off stop but I don't understand how.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Oh! That's different. That would be for crosscuts.
[...]
-> My question for you is: Does your auxiliary fence leave enough gap behind it (to the rip fence) to work that way comfortably?
Quote:
Originally Posted by salisboss View Post
I believe so. Thanks for this great information.
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
[Quoted my previous post first.]

This seems like way too much "overkill" to me. A simple block clamped or sticky taped to the primary fence is all you need. Having the sliding fence extended all the way towards the forward past the front of the blade is not the way I would do it... to much in the way out in front of the table, so easily bumped out of alignment or causing a below the belt injury ......
[...]
I have no argument with anything you said. Pulling the auxiliary fence that far forward for those types of crosscuts would not be my preferred method either.

All I was trying to do is explain the user manual statement about "cut off stop" to @salisboss.
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