8-1/4" Circular Saw Blade For Cutting 1-3/4" Butcher Block? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
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8-1/4" Circular Saw Blade For Cutting 1-3/4" Butcher Block?

I'm going to be wanting to cut some 1-3/4 in. thick butcher block using my 8-1/4" Milwaukee circular saw. Can somebody recommend a particular blade for my saw that would be best for this job? Or, if not a particular blade, what blade characteristics would be best suited for the job?


Thanks in advance!

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post #2 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 02:12 PM
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!2 cents warning! (and I dont know your skill level here, so Ill just post this as forward as possible, not trying to insult your intelligence or knowledge base, just some cursory information)

If you're looking for a fresh, clean cut line, more teeth the better is typically the go-to. That said, more teeth can be more chance of burning/marking. I find burn marks on end grain to be a much bigger pain in the butt to deal with than sanding some stray frays off.

I'd say it totally depends on what you're going to do after here. Is this a one cut and done kinda thing (I rarely use my circular saw for anything EXCEPT this kind of task, and its not super common), or are you trying to do other tasks like breaking down plywood later on? If you plan on using it for other tasks, then for one cut, 1 3/4" is PLENTY of meat to sand back and the blade type really wont matter too terribly much in the grand scheme of things. As long as the blade is sharp, and youre cutting straight, you really shouldnt be blowing out chunks of wood from tearout. Thicker, higher tooth count blades can bog down and take a lot more effort and focus than a low tooth blade; some circular saws just lack the oomph to really get it cutting well (burning can happen if youre not moving the blade). Thinner kerfs cut easier, but do have a tendency to "wander", and on a circular saw, this can actually be quite a pain even with a straight edge guide. The absolute truth is, as long as its not a dull, rusty, warped blade, pretty much anything is going to "work" fine here for this one cut.

So that said, id recommend if youre doing a one and done, stick between 30 and 40 teeth ("combination blade") , if you're planning on plywood duty, go higher on the teeth (a "finishing blade", diablo makes a 64t count 8" blade thatd be wonderful on plywood, and should provide a really smooth cut on that butcher block). If its going on 2x4 duty then go to the lower end of the 30 (a combination or framing blade here).

I generally stick to diablo for circular saw blades, simply for half decent quality carbide blade that wont make you cry when you buy it; but in general any "decent brand" is going to serve the purpose just fine. Dont really "need" a forrest blade, but if you got the scratch, go for it.
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post #3 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the follow-up, Bob!

Here's what I'm going to be doing: Cutting 1-3/4 in. Butcher Block?.

The edges don't need to be particularly smooth, but they do need to be straight and clean. So, from your comments, it sounds like perhaps a thicker, 40-tooth combination blade would be the way to go? If the cut is excessively rough I can always clean it up with my jack plane

It's worth it enough for me to pay a bit more for a superior blade even for this one use. (Though I imagine I'll find other uses for it down the road.) I don't want to take a chance on ruining this top.

I'll look at Diablo and Forrest blades. Thanks!

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post #4 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 03:19 PM
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No matter which blade in a circ saw.....

There will be a tendency for the saw to meander because there is only wrist control unless you use a guide for the base. There are many types of guides to choose from, Kreg is one that comes up often.


I would make a cross cut guide for the circular saw to insure better control like this:
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ross+cut+guide


The thickness you are cutting is smack in the middle between "normal" and thick, so you can try a Diablo Thin Kerf or use a full kerf, HOWEVER full kerfs blades aren't offered that much in 8 1/4" diameter as far as I could tell because they require more HP:
https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Ultimat...145242&sr=8-13
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-30-2019 at 04:02 PM.
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post #5 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 03:25 PM
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Haha, the forrest blades are great but the price might make you gasp for air

The diablo blade will be perfectly fine here, the forrest is just something you keep forever and have it sharpened and stuff. If you're not feeling confident about the cut, make some practice ones on some scrap wood if you have any. The most important part is getting your edge guide perfectly parallel to the ends and keeping a smooth cut going.

This will get you where you need to be just fine.

https://www.amazon.com/Freud-D0840X-...5145119&sr=8-1



also while im here, I skimmed over your other post. If you dont have a biscuit jointer, definitely do some dowels to keep the boards parallel and at least moving together. They also make special countertop joiners/brackets and theres TONS of different types, but they basically all function the same. You route/drill out the space for the connectors and it pulls the countertops together. Just google "countertop connector" and you'll get all different kinds.

I.e.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/j...oaAnreEALw_wcB


When I did my parents kitchen a few years ago, I just used straight brackets inlaid in and used a rat tail file and made the holes slightly oblong to allow for wood expansion. Never had an issue and it never showed gaps.
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post #6 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
There will be a tendency for the saw to meander because there is only wrist control unless you use a guide for the base. There are many types of guides to choose from, Kreg is one that comes up often.
Unfortunately, those Kreg guides come in a maximum length of 48", and my top is 60" long. Otherwise I'd be on one of those in a heartbeat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I would make a cross cut guide for the circular saw to insure better control like this:
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ross+cut+guide
Thanks. I'll look at it.

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Originally Posted by bob493 View Post
The most important part is getting your edge guide perfectly parallel to the ends and keeping a smooth cut going.
Noted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bob493 View Post
This will get you where you need to be just fine.

https://www.amazon.com/Freud-D0840X-...5145119&sr=8-1
That's exactly the blade I planned to get.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bob493 View Post
also while im here, I skimmed over your other post. If you dont have a biscuit jointer, definitely do some dowels to keep the boards parallel and at least moving together.
In fact I do have a biscuit joiner. Recently purchased, used, for another project. But I was thinking dowels, for locators, would be better in this application. I just haven't figured out how to get two opposing holes, one in which the dowel rod would be glued and the other which would accept that dowel as a locator when I put the pieces together, perfectly aligned.

It's done with dining room table expansion pieces all the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bob493 View Post
They also make special countertop joiners/brackets and theres TONS of different types, but they basically all function the same. You route/drill out the space for the connectors and it pulls the countertops together. Just google "countertop connector" and you'll get all different kinds.

I.e.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/j...oaAnreEALw_wcB
Thanks. I'll look at them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bob493 View Post
When I did my parents kitchen a few years ago, I just used straight brackets inlaid in and used a rat tail file and made the holes slightly oblong to allow for wood expansion. Never had an issue and it never showed gaps.
Noted.

Thanks for the suggestions, guys!

"There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey." -- John Ruskin (1819-1900)
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post #7 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 06:09 PM
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responded to PM!
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post #8 of 11 Old 11-30-2019, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
I just haven't figured out how to get two opposing holes, one in which the dowel rod would be glued and the other which would accept that dowel as a locator when I put the pieces together, perfectly aligned.

There's a tool for that! I saw it in the Lee Valley catalog but it must also exist elsewhere. It's basically just a piece of metal with a point that is the same diameter as your dowel, you drill the first dowel hole and put the tool in the hole then line up the two pieces of countertop and press them together, the tool makes a point in the undrilled section at the exact position you need to drill the second hole. Seems simple once you see it, I think they come in various sizes and bags of four so you pick you dowel size and buy enough to do the whole seam at once.


HTH



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post #9 of 11 Old 12-01-2019, 12:10 AM Thread Starter
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There's a tool for that!
I figured there might be :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayArr View Post
I saw it in the Lee Valley catalog but it must also exist elsewhere. It's basically just a piece of metal with a point that is the same diameter as your dowel, you drill the first dowel hole and put the tool in the hole then line up the two pieces of countertop and press them together, the tool makes a point in the undrilled section at the exact position you need to drill the second hole.
I envisioned fabricating that, but, since it was in the Lee Valley catalogue, odds are, as you wrote, probably others make them, too.

I'll do some searching. Thanks!

"There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey." -- John Ruskin (1819-1900)
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-01-2019, 12:26 AM
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This is partly why I recommend the biscuit, the layout would be no problem. The bolts would provide the strength, and the biscuits would just keep it parallel to each other, and itd be fine. Dowels would give more lateral strength, but that wouldnt be necessary in this application if you're bolting the top down.

At any rate, theres a LOT of options for laying this stuff out. I dont really use dowels for structural stuff, so someone else will have to chime in with a recommendation.


https://www.amazon.com/s?k=dowel+jig&ref=nb_sb_noss_2
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post #11 of 11 Old 12-01-2019, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
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Another thought, guys.

I do own a vintage Delta 10" Contractor's Saw. Years ago I replaced the stamped steel wings with the cast iron ones, flattened the table and aligned the saw with a TS Aligner Jr.. The only problem is the original fence: It's ok for lighter material, but I don't know as I could trust it for a rip this long on a piece this heavy.

But Delta's model 36-T30 T3 upgrade fence gets very good reviews on Amazon and is only $165. It goes out to 30 in. to the right of the blade. I do have an auxiliary outfeed roller. I could easily get another. They're not expensive at HF.

"There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey." -- John Ruskin (1819-1900)
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