20 amps at 110 volts Bandsaw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 10:24 PM Thread Starter
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20 amps at 110 volts Bandsaw

I want to order a 17" bandsaw and I am concerned about whether it needs a dedicated outlet like an electric stove or dryer or can I just plug it into an ordinary outlet and go?
The brochure says 20 amps at 110 volts or 10 amps at 220 volts? Any guidance greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 10:27 PM
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If it were mine I would wire it for 220 v and put it on a dedicated circuit. But definitely a dedicated circuit whichever way you go.
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post #3 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 10:37 PM
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I'd wire it 220. Due to lack of space in in my breaker box I only have two 220 volt circuits shared between 3 tools. It really isn't a big deal.
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post #4 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 10:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, I guess what I'm explaining poorly is can I run a saw that big on a household plug? I run an old Sears contractor saw and a 6 " Laguna jointer on separate household plugs and I'm wondering if I could get away with that for a bigger bandsaw like I'm considering.
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post #5 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 10:58 PM
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Do you have 20 amp 110 outlets wired into your shop, most ordinary outlets are 15 amp.

If not you will have to run a new line to run the saw, in that case you might as well run a 220 circuit.

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post #6 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 11:00 PM
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Not necessarily.... some 110 circuits are wired for 15 amps. And yes for safety it would be best as a dedicated 20 amp circuit BUT BEST if wired 220. this saves electricity and is easier on the motor during starting and operating.
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post #7 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 11:01 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC
Do you have 20 amp 110 outlets wired into your shop, most ordinary outlets are 15 amp. If not you will have to run a new line to run the saw, in that case you might as well run a 220 circuit.
Ah I see now, unfortunately just 15 amp so yes time to call sparky.

Cheers.
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post #8 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 11:39 PM
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I doubt the saw would run on a 20 amp 110 volt breaker anyway. Have sparky wire it 220. It isn't that hard. You could probably do it yourself and save $.
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post #9 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 11:44 PM
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DEpending on how far away your dryer outlet is, you can make a heavy duty extension cord and plug it in the dryer outlet when it is no being used. I did that for over a year and it worked out just fine.
Just make sure you rewire your motor for the 220V. There should be a name plate on the motor with some specs and a wiring diagram to rewire the motor for 220. Very easy to do.

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post #10 of 76 Old 04-12-2016, 11:55 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B
DEpending on how far away your dryer outlet is, you can make a heavy duty extension cord and plug it in the dryer outlet when it is no being used. I did that for over a year and it worked out just fine. Just make sure you rewire your motor for the 220V. There should be a name plate on the motor with some specs and a wiring diagram to rewire the motor for 220. Very easy to do.
Love this!

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post #11 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 07:00 AM
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If it actually draws 20 amps on 110V you might have to put it on a dedicated line anyway. If you are at the saw for very long especially if you have anything else on the line running you shouldn't draw more than 16 amps on a 20 amp breaker. The general rule is to limit the draw to 80% of what the breaker is rated at. If it were me I would wire it to 220 but if that isn't an option I would change the wire to 10 gauge and install a 30 amp breaker.
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post #12 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
I doubt the saw would run on a 20 amp 110 volt breaker anyway. Have sparky wire it 220. It isn't that hard. You could probably do it yourself and save $.
"You could probably do it yourself and save $"

I do not think you should do this. Hire a professional. From your post it does not appear that work of this type in is your wheelhouse.

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post #13 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 07:46 AM
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[QUOTE=GeorgeC;1342857]................. i do not think you should do this. Hire a professional. From your post it does not appear that work of this type in is your wheelhouse..../QUOTE]

I totally agree with George. This is not meant to be a disparaging remark, but it is a humorous expression and mainly, it drives the point home.

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post #14 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 07:47 AM
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+1 on a new 220v circuit.

Regarding lower powered 110v tools, how often do you run more than one at once? Even in industrial power distribution design, if the motors aren't always running, the cable and fuses are sized for less than the motor nameplate amp total.
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post #15 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 08:07 AM
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if the motor is dual voltage (110v/220v) then you have the choice to run the tool on the 110v/20amp circuit, or a 220v/10a circuit.


a "typical" outlet circuit will have: 20 amp circuit breaker, 12 ga wire, and a 15 amp receptacle. after you verify the cb and wire, you should change the recep out for a 20 amp version to have a supply circuit capable of 20 amps for this tool.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
If you are at the saw for very long especially if you have anything else on the line running you shouldn't draw more than 16 amps on a 20 amp breaker. The general rule is to limit the draw to 80% of what the breaker is rated at.
this is for branch circuits feeding continuous loads, which are on for >3 hours time. not to say that you couldn't derate all branch ckts for an element of safety.

Last edited by TimPa; 04-13-2016 at 08:11 AM.
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post #16 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
if the motor is dual voltage (110v/220v) then you have the choice to run the tool on the 110v/20amp circuit, or a 220v/10a circuit.


a "typical" outlet circuit will have: 20 amp circuit breaker, 12 ga wire, and a 15 amp receptacle. after you verify the cb and wire, you should change the recep out for a 20 amp version to have a supply circuit capable of 20 amps for this tool.



this is for branch circuits feeding continuous loads, which are on for >3 hours time. not to say that you couldn't derate all branch ckts for an element of safety.
That's all fine on paper but it makes a difference if you are aggravated by running back and forth to the breaker box resetting it. Putting a 20 amp saw on a 20 amp circuit is pushing limits.
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post #17 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
.........Putting a 20 amp saw on a 20 amp circuit is pushing limits.
When in doubt, feel the wires, especially at the plug end. Slightly warm is not bad, but keep checking it. Hot is never good.
Also keep in mind that as the wires get warm, their electrical resistance gets higher. This results in even more warming. It becomes a system that feeds on itself. Either the wire, the fuse, the tool or all 3 are going die a painful death.

I still maintain that the safest cure is to use the 220V dryer outlet. That way when you pull the dryer plug, it cant be used at the same time as the saw. This is very safe. The only down side is the connecting and disconnecting of the new extension cord being a PITA. Then again, most woodworkers dont spend a lot of time on a band saw.

The plugs for the dryer outlet can be found in Walmart, Home Depot, Lowes and just about any hardware store. I havent bought any on a long time so I will guess the plug to cost around $15 or less these days.

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Last edited by Tony B; 04-13-2016 at 09:15 AM.
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post #18 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 09:11 AM
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a proper 20 amp circuit is designed to supply a 20 amp load safely, with no overload conditions. if the over current protection device is tripping, there is an issue with the device and it should be looked at for a problem.
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post #19 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
When in doubt, feel the wires, especially at the plug end. Slightly warm is not bad, but keep checking it. Hot is never good.
Also keep in mind that as the wires get warm, their electrical resistance gets higher. This results in even more warming. It becomes a system that feeds on itself. Either the wire, the fuse, the tool or all 3 are going die a painful death.

I still maintain that the safest cure is to use the 220V dryer outlet. That way when you pull the dryer plug, it cant be used at the same time as the saw. This is very safe. The only down side is the connecting and disconnecting of the new extension cord being a PITA. Then again, most woodworkers dont spend a lot of time on a band saw.

The plugs for the dryer outlet can be found in Walmart, Home Depot, Lowes and just about any hardware store. I havent bought any on a long time so I will guess the plug to cost around $15 or less these days.
If your dryer is not in constant use, you might see about doing the same set-up for your Table saw, if it can be rewired for 220v also.

When you make the extension cord for the 220V you will be using a dryer plug at one end. I would strongly urge you to change the 110V ends of both the cord and the tool. There are less expensive 220v plugs both male and female that can be used at the tool end. This will elimate any chance of accidentally plugging a 220V plug into a 110V socket or outlet because the less expensive 220v plugs and recepticals will not fit in a 110v socket. The pin configuration is different.

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post #20 of 76 Old 04-13-2016, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
That's all fine on paper but it makes a difference if you are aggravated by running back and forth to the breaker box resetting it. Putting a 20 amp saw on a 20 amp circuit is pushing limits.

Putting a 20 amp saw in a home shop on a 20 amp circuit is by no means pushing it. That saw will rarely ever see full amp draw, and when it does, it will be for a short amount of time.

I have all of my circuits in my shop sized correctly, 15 amp circuits with 15 amp or less tools and 20 amp circuits for 15-20 amp tools. The only time I've EVER popped a breaker is when I stalled my RAS in really thick oak.

No ones hobby shop is ever going to have the tools running at 100% draw for hours on end.

I'm a firm believer that running a 30 amp circuit when a 20 amp circuit meets the requirements is a waste of money.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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