1950-1960s planers and jointer vs new ones - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 9Likes
  • 2 Post By FrankC
  • 2 Post By difalkner
  • 1 Post By woodnthings
  • 1 Post By Alexander MAS
  • 1 Post By Alexander MAS
  • 1 Post By ajdragon
  • 1 Post By Larry Schweitzer
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 01:41 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Alexander MAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: RS, Brazil
Posts: 3
View Alexander MAS's Photo Album My Photos
Hello. I would like to get some advice about machines. I am setting up a production line for glulam beams, and I have the opportunity to do it with some very old machinery which I can buy at low price. What do you think? Would it be better to buy some new ones, or are those old ones good, after replacement of blades and bearings?

Any help or information is welcome. Thank you.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-20190930-WA0038_1570555050327.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	269.9 KB
ID:	379585  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-20190930-WA0018_1570556146969.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	254.9 KB
ID:	379587  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-20190930-WA0016_1570556234576.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	276.2 KB
ID:	379589  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-20190930-WA0020_1570556352941.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	239.9 KB
ID:	379591  


Last edited by Alexander MAS; 10-08-2019 at 01:51 PM.
Alexander MAS is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 02:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,736
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Cannot answer your question without personal inspection or a lot more information.


My inclination says to buy new. But, without on site inspection anything would be pure speculation.


George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 02:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,142
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Depends if you are handy, if you are paying to have them maintained it may not be worth it, if you can do it you will end up with a better machine, just without the bells and whistles in many cases.
TobyC and Alexander MAS like this.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
FrankC is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to FrankC For This Useful Post:
Alexander MAS (10-08-2019)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 03:33 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 3,433
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Welcome to the forum, Alexander! Add your location to your profile so it shows in the side panel.

I prefer old iron but if you're in a situation where you'll have employees, OSHA inspections, training new folks, etc. then new may be better with the latest in guards and safety considerations. Insurance may even be less with newer and safer equipment.

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to difalkner For This Useful Post:
Alexander MAS (10-08-2019)
post #5 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 03:38 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,693
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Obviously, they are still in operation ......

So, it now is a matter of condition and previous maintainace. Bearings and blades are the sources of wear. Blades are a given and bearings should be standard sizes. So, if you can remove a cutterhead and replace the bearings you should be OK. I have a friend with a one man commercial door shop who uses only old, heavy cast iron machines and does fantastic work.



The motors are probably 3 phase, so not too difficult to replace with the belt drives I see. You may be fortunate and be able to set them up and start production, but that's an unknown at this point. No way to give any better advice from over here.....
TobyC likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #6 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Alexander MAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: RS, Brazil
Posts: 3
View Alexander MAS's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the answers so far.

I am from Brazil, and to get new machines around here means buying from China, which I'm not sure about quality and durability, or buying some expensive ones from, say, germany.

All those old machines are from Europe, probably Germany.
difalkner likes this.

Last edited by Alexander MAS; 10-08-2019 at 04:44 PM.
Alexander MAS is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 04:47 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 151
View ajdragon's Photo Album My Photos
Hi


It looks like they are still being used in the mill. Are the owners closing down shop and retiring. if so then those machines are probably still in good condition.
ajdragon is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Alexander MAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: RS, Brazil
Posts: 3
View Alexander MAS's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdragon View Post
It looks like they are still being used in the mill. Are the owners closing down shop and retiring. if so then those machines are probably still in good condition.
Yes, the owner is retiring. The machines do work nicely, there is some maintenance needed for the blades and maybe bearings too.
TobyC likes this.
Alexander MAS is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 07:54 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 151
View ajdragon's Photo Album My Photos
Hi


That's what I kind of thought, those are the type of tools you look for when buying old tools.
TobyC likes this.
ajdragon is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 10-08-2019, 09:13 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 392
View Larry Schweitzer's Photo Album My Photos
You can rehab those old machines to work reasonably well. But there are more than just bearings and knives to get them in good condition. All the wear surfaces are probably uneven. The bed may be more worn in the center than near the sides. The pressure bar probably the same. The feed rollers may be worn enough that they don't grip well. The table roll bearings are probably shot. The guide system for the bed probably has more wear in the area most used. The gears or chains or ? that drive the feed may be very worn. If the feed roller is of the segmented type some of the springs may be broken or the fits so worn they no longer all engage the work uniformly. Much depends on what you want to end up with. With enough work and the services of a good machine shop they can be nearly as good as new. Even cracked castings can be repaired.
All that said it is highly unlikely they will match the quality of cut of a new European production planer with a segmented carbide helical head. I don't know about the Chinese stuff. At any rate for production work on glue lam you should use carbide knives. The glue lines will eat groves in the HSS.
Alexander MAS likes this.
Larry Schweitzer is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Larry Schweitzer For This Useful Post:
Alexander MAS (10-09-2019)
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome