Wood block plane - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 5 Old 12-01-2019, 03:08 PM Thread Starter
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Wood block plane

I need a block plane, I have a blade, and I REALLY like those scott meek type hand planes... they look super easy to make anyway.


I have all kinds of woods, but I specifically have lignum vitae I was thinking of use on the bottom of the plane. Being one of the absolute hardest woods in the world, it seems like it would be a good choice for sole wood right? Is there a particular reason the scott meek planes dont usually have laminated soles? While you can redo the bottoms, I would imagine some maple would start to wear down somewhat appreciably over time. Is this simply an "option" or is it done for a reason? On the LARGER meeks, they DO have a laminated sole usually.

On the flip side, I could just make the whole thing out of lignum
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post #2 of 5 Old 12-01-2019, 11:22 PM
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I talked to Scott Meek a little over a year ago. His preferred wood for soles are oily woods like African black wood, ipe, or Osage orange.

Really, seems like most anything will work so long as it’s tough enough.
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post #3 of 5 Old 12-09-2019, 06:09 AM
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I have doubts about whether a wooden bodied block plane is feasible and I have certainly never seen one.The reason for my position is that as the iron approaches a horizontal angle,there is an increasing likelihood that the force from a wedge will cause the block to split.Feel free to post examples of successful wooden block planes to show me how mistaken I am.With the standard 45 or 60 degree pitch of a smoothing or jack plane,the force of the wedge isn't mainly across the grain of the wooden body and is partly distributed along it.
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post #4 of 5 Old 12-09-2019, 10:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fareastern View Post
I have doubts about whether a wooden bodied block plane is feasible and I have certainly never seen one.The reason for my position is that as the iron approaches a horizontal angle,there is an increasing likelihood that the force from a wedge will cause the block to split.Feel free to post examples of successful wooden block planes to show me how mistaken I am.With the standard 45 or 60 degree pitch of a smoothing or jack plane,the force of the wedge isn't mainly across the grain of the wooden body and is partly distributed along it.


What isn’t feasible is a “low angle” block plane out of wood. There is no reason a block plane can’t be built using a standard 45 degrees like a bench plane.
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post #5 of 5 Old 12-10-2019, 05:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
What isn’t feasible is a “low angle” block plane out of wood. There is no reason a block plane can’t be built using a standard 45 degrees like a bench plane.

You can certainly build such a thing,but would it be a block plane or a novelty like the fabled Stanley No 1?Heres what wikipedia has to say about block planes:


"A block plane is a small metal-bodied woodworking hand plane which typically has the blade bedded at a lower angle than other planes, with the bevel up. It is designed to cut end grain and do touchup or finish work. It is typically small enough to be used with one hand.



It is a common modern error to refer to older wooden-bodied bench planes as block planes, as they were made from a block of wood. Historically, the term “block plane” was not used before it was applied to small metal-bodied planes, which were designed and produced beginning in the 1860s."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_plane




To most people, the defining characteristic is the bevel up part.I have made a number of small planes down to about 3 1/2 inches long in the style of wooden smoothing planes and would never describe them as block planes.The example in the image file I have attempted to upload will be 40 next year.
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