SQUARING a plane iron - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 12-22-2018, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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SQUARING a plane iron

What I should have named my other post...

Hi guys,
I bought a plane at an auction recently and went to sharpen the iron and noticed it is "skewed" to one side by a decent amount. I can use the lever adjusent and get it almost square, but it's still not perfect. How can I get the blade square again?? I have a coarse DMT plate, and a 1000/6000 water stone. Also have a belt sander with any sand paper grit, and have access to a grinder if needed.
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-22-2018, 09:16 PM
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If you have a sharpening jig you just mount the blade square to the jig and sharpen away with something course until the bevel is almost ground straight across. Switch to a finer grit until a burr is worked up all the way across the back, flatten the burr off the back, and process to finer grits until youíre satisfied.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-22-2018, 09:17 PM Thread Starter
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I spent some time doing that.. however I have a $15 Amazon jig... Getting the MKii for Xmas . Will just wait for that!
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 05:52 AM
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If you canít stand the heat...

Using a bench grinder or belt sander is risky. You have about 1 second of contact before you create enough heat in the plane iron to adversely affect the tempering. Low speed wet grinders limit this if you have access to one. Using course grade sandpaper on a known flat surface with your sharpening jig, to rough-out the new shape, can help if your coursest stone is too slow. Even here be mindful of heat.

Better to invest the time to avoid risking the iron, than spend more time and $ trying to replace a ruined iron. Enjoy the new sharpening jig.

- Greg


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post #5 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 08:01 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Keep the blade cool!

Keep dipping the blade in water to keep it cool and prevent losing the temper.

This will show you how to sharpen a plane blade or chisel on a common belt sander and a honing guide:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 11:06 AM
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Using a honing jig to get it as square as possible is the fastest way. The flat side of a plane blade is often neglected, but shouldn't be. Before proceeding to work the bevel, the flat side should be as flat as possible for about 1" from the cutting edge...and to as fine a grit as you have, to produce a polished surface. The reason for doing the flat side first is that when you form the bevel, the intersection where the bevel meets the back of the iron will only be as sharp as your scratch marks (made by your finest grit). This can be made evident by using a 10x magnifying glass or more. I have magnified my results to 100x magnification using an attachment on my cell phone to better understand the actual edge created after honing and stropping. Flattening the back (flat) side to about 1" from the cutting edge will only be done once for the life of the iron to provide the best intersection possible. After that you can concentrate all your efforts on the bevel to get it square/angle etc. I think most people are shocked to ultimately see how much better a plane will work when they get it right for the first time. It takes practice and perseverance but you will get there over time.
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Gary
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post #7 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 11:10 AM
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I take a square and mark a line on the iron then use my grinder to get it close. Finish on sandpaper, stone, or diamond plate with a jig or by hand.

"The kind of man who wants the government to adopt and enforce his ideas is always the kind of man whose ideas are idiotic." -H.L. Mencken
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmercer_48083 View Post
Using a honing jig to get it as square as possible is the fastest way. The flat side of a plane blade is often neglected, but shouldn't be. Before proceeding to work the bevel, the flat side should be as flat as possible for about 1" from the cutting edge...and to as fine a grit as you have, to produce a polished surface. The reason for doing the flat side first is that when you form the bevel, the intersection where the bevel meets the back of the iron will only be as sharp as your scratch marks (made by your finest grit). This can be made evident by using a 10x magnifying glass or more. I have magnified my results to 100x magnification using an attachment on my cell phone to better understand the actual edge created after honing and stropping. Flattening the back (flat) side to about 1" from the cutting edge will only be done once for the life of the iron to provide the best intersection possible. After that you can concentrate all your efforts on the bevel to get it square/angle etc. I think most people are shocked to ultimately see how much better a plane will work when they get it right for the first time. It takes practice and perseverance but you will get there over time.
Thanks for that. I do this with my chisels, but never thought to with plans irons. Whats the name of the cell phone app for the magnification?
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post #9 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 08:33 PM
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I bought a clip on microscope that fits over the lens of the camera...kinda like a telephoto lens but the other way. once clipped to the camera over the lense, you adjust the microscope part of the lense and it has a led light to aluminate what your looking at...then just snap the picture or video on the camera. clips on like a clothespin. What's interesting is looking at a chisel or plane iron after sharpening to 8000 grit...the steel looks like corrugated steel when magnified. After stropping with green paste (100 strokes) then white paste (100 strokes) it looks smoother, but BOY DOES IT WORK AWSOME! The microscope convinced me to try to do better at sharpening. There is finer pastes out there, but they are expensive...too much $$ for me.

Gary
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-23-2018, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhaugle View Post
Thanks for that. I do this with my chisels, but never thought to with plans irons. Whats the name of the cell phone app for the magnification?


If you have an Apple product there is magnification built in. You need to turn it under under settings -> general -> accessibility -> magnification. Once turned on you access magnification by pressing the home button three times (if you have a home button, if not, I have no idea how to access it)


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #11 of 11 Old 12-24-2018, 10:51 AM
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I made a right angle jig that rides along the tool rest on my grinder. I take very light passes across the wheel, dipping in cold water in between.

Dave in CT, USA
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