Sharpening stones. (I make them) - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 40 Old 01-07-2008, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
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At that price will you sharpen my planes and then my kitchen knives, my chisels, my planer blade sand and and . They wouldn't even give me the time of day at that price.

Richard
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post #22 of 40 Old 01-07-2008, 02:14 PM
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At those prices I wasted alot of money on stones, jigs , sand paper and who knows what else. I'll most likely send you all my sharpenings until I get good at it.
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post #23 of 40 Old 01-07-2008, 02:59 PM Thread Starter
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until I get good at it.
Like this ? Another one of my sharpening videos. No jigs, free hand sharpened.

[youtube]9tVaEOAQ0rs[/youtube]
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post #24 of 40 Old 01-07-2008, 03:24 PM
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Like this ? Another one of my sharpening videos. No jigs, free hand sharpened.
Thats scary stuff. Just don't slip when you're shaving the neck area.
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post #25 of 40 Old 01-07-2008, 06:23 PM
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I have a question. Kind of trivia. I was working with a guy
comparing sharpening techniques. I thought I was good before I saw your stuff. He said when you put direct pressure on a blade it won't cut. There has to be some back and forth motion, even if it's so little you can't see the movement. He took he very sharp pocket knife and pressed his thumb on it, and it didn't cut him. He grew up in a tough neighborhood in Philly and this was a trick he learned as a kid. He was 50 at the time I met him. I never had the nerve to try it.
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post #26 of 40 Old 01-07-2008, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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He said when you put direct pressure on a blade it won't cut.
Tell him to send his pocket knife over here...I will sharpen it for free. Then have him put direct pressure on it to prove his point (have the band-aids in your pocket ) Sure a good callous it tougher than regular skin and may not draw blood, the side of any finger would work.

Watch that video several times (turn up the volume too). I simply drop the hair on the blade. The ONLY pressure is the weight of the over hanging piece of hair. I have linked that video before and said this. Take the sharpest thing you have (razor knife, box cutter, exacto knife...) and with the blade upright pull a hair onto it from both sides with your fingers. You will be surprised how much force it takes to sever the hair, maybe that will put this in perspective.

There is no "back and forth" when you shave your face ? One direction, right? What about a hand plane, they cut wood with direct pressure. No trick photography, I force one of my hairs onto a blade and it cuts it.
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post #27 of 40 Old 01-11-2008, 02:01 PM
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I had watched it a couple times. That is the most amazing thing I've ever seen. That's what made me think of that guy. I just took him at his word. I wasn't going to try it. I did see him do it with his knife. I haven't seen the guy in years. I used to work with him. That knife is just plane scary. I'm real happy when mine cut paper. The guy that
taught me was taught by an old timer. I always thought I was pretty good, better than all my friends. Your a different level.
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post #28 of 40 Old 01-13-2008, 05:33 AM
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back to making that strop

I start with the hide of an elk or deer....

I have brain-tanned a number of hides. Also done some knapping. I'd be willing to bet, Daren, that you may well have done a bit of these yourself?
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post #29 of 40 Old 01-13-2008, 07:18 AM Thread Starter
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Daren, that you may well have done a bit of these yourself?
I have not tanned any hides myself, just helped a little and watched. I have some buddies that belong to a black powder club, they do recreations and stuff. I have been to some of their get togethers and messed with a little knapping and long bow making. This one buddy makes period clothing, some from animal hides and his specialty is powder horns, he makes some beauties.
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post #30 of 40 Old 01-14-2008, 11:29 PM
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cool read
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post #31 of 40 Old 05-15-2016, 03:06 PM
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dennis

Is it possible to cut a carborundum stone down with a diamond tubsaw? I have to have a narrow stone to dress a nick on a crankshaft and a store bought stone is too wide to get to where I need to work.
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post #32 of 40 Old 05-15-2016, 04:32 PM
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You can cut a natural stone down with a carborundum blade. I've cut and repaired marble and granite countertops with a masonry carborundum blade before.
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post #33 of 40 Old 05-16-2016, 02:47 AM
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Yes those stones do cut easily,but what about cutting down the small sharpening stones sold in hardware stores?
I think they are synthetic but don't know much about them.

If I can't cut one of them down, i will have to make astone and cut it down...and I do not trust myself to get it absolutely flat.
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post #34 of 40 Old 05-16-2016, 01:31 PM
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3M wet&dry automotive finishing sandpapers. I use 600,800,1000 & 1500 for sharpening wood carving tools.
Wrap a strip around a skinny stick with flat sides?
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post #35 of 40 Old 09-01-2016, 12:42 AM
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That's really cool that you make your own stones. It seems like everywhere I look around, hand sharpening is becoming a lost art. It's my preferred method for sure.
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post #36 of 40 Old 10-02-2016, 06:08 AM
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Very interesting, which natural stone types are suitable for sharpening stones?
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post #37 of 40 Old 10-04-2016, 10:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigredc View Post
I have a question. Kind of trivia. I was working with a guy
comparing sharpening techniques. I thought I was good before I saw your stuff. He said when you put direct pressure on a blade it won't cut. There has to be some back and forth motion, even if it's so little you can't see the movement. He took he very sharp pocket knife and pressed his thumb on it, and it didn't cut him. He grew up in a tough neighborhood in Philly and this was a trick he learned as a kid. He was 50 at the time I met him. I never had the nerve to try it.
When teaching the other cooks at my old restaurant how to use a knife, I would take my personal knife (which can practically split atoms it's so sharp) and grip it hard by the blade, knife edge in my palm.

I always instructed one of them to grab the handle and try to pull it from my hand.

It was a quick way to teach them to not fear the knife so much.

Never got cut once on that demonstration.
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post #38 of 40 Old 10-04-2016, 10:41 PM
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no volunteers?

Quote:
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When teaching the other cooks at my old restaurant how to use a knife, I would take my personal knife (which can practically split atoms it's so sharp) and grip it hard by the blade, knife edge in my palm.

I always instructed one of them to grab the handle and try to pull it from my hand.

It was a quick way to teach them to not fear the knife so much.

Never got cut once on that demonstration.
Are you saying that no one wanted to slice the bosses hand off? Job security took presence over drama. Not a chance I would have taken myself, knowing that a loose cannon may not give a damn.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #39 of 40 Old 10-04-2016, 10:59 PM
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I think pulling a knife out of one's hand is a dangerous and foolish thing to be playing around with and urge anyone reading this thread not to try it.
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post #40 of 40 Old 10-04-2016, 11:59 PM
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Are you saying that no one wanted to slice the bosses hand off? Job security took presence over drama. Not a chance I would have taken myself, knowing that a loose cannon may not give a damn.
A blade cuts through friction. If the blade remains stationary you can try to pull it all you want but nothing will happen. I had a few really cocky fellows try to jerk it right out of my hand, it was always really funny to see the looks on their faces when it didn't work.

By the way, I wasn't the boss. I had no control over hires or fires but I did have a lot of say in the kitchen being one of the lead cooks and I was responsible for training a good majority of newbies. I wouldn't suggest anyone ever do that without seriously questioning there skills and knowledge of their skills and blades first.

To further my point on the matter, there is an old sword technique used against heavily armored opponents. You would hold the blade of your sword and use the edges of the guard as a hammer to strike through armor. I have even practiced this technique before on dummy models using real, sharp swords. Never once cut myself.

If you don't believe me, you can look it up. Or you can grab any kitchen knife and give it a good squeeze. Just don't slide your fingers.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mordhau

Last edited by Rodrat; 10-05-2016 at 12:03 AM.
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