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post #21 of 34 Old 01-11-2018, 12:36 PM
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I used sandpaper and a glass plate for a few years, but I got tired of replacing sheets all the time. I still use sandpaper for really rough work, though. From there, I switched to a set of DMT diamond stones, and that's almost certainly where I'm staying. I use a strop with both.

If I were starting over, here's what I'd get:
1) A grinder. There are some edges (badly damaged, non-square, etc) that just aren't worth working with on anything else. Hand-powered, electrically powered, whatever, it just needs a good grinding wheel.

2) A set of three DMT plates, Blue, Red, and Green. The blue is for really dull blades and light reshaping, the red is for moderately dull blades, the green is a (semi-)final hone. If I'm doing a lot of chiseling, the green plate sits on my bench where I can take a few strokes if the chisel starts to dull.

3) A strop. The one I have now is just a rectangle of leather glued to a piece of MDF, with the yellow Flexcut compound on it. This is always on my bench when I'm working, and chisels get a pass over it regularly, and before they go back into the tool chest.

With an inexpensive grinder, the entire kit will be less than $250, and may be under $200 if you find a good deal on the grinder or diamond plates. The plates should last for years, with a minimal amount of care, and if you only use the grinder for sharpening it'll last just about forever.

I don't really think there's a wrong answer, though. There might be an answer that's wrong for a given person, but not universally.
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post #22 of 34 Old 01-24-2018, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
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For those still following along at home:

I decided on DMT diamond plates - the 3x8 variety. Coarse (325), Fine (600), Extra-fine (1200). I figured if it's good enough for Paul Sellers, it's good enough for me. Long story short, Amazon FUBARed my order and sent me the wrong stone...twice. The Amazon sticker/barcode on the box was wrong on both of them. They were tagged as Fine, but the packaged stone was actually Coarse. I had to send it back two times. Anyway...

In the meantime, I bought a set of 5 Stanley Bailey chisels that were in a bargain bin. Not the greatest, but I figured they would be a decent starter set. So I've been long looking forward to my night of therapeutic sharpening, as my WoodRiver plane has been a shelf queen these past couple weeks, waiting on sharpening equipment also.

The chisels were a mixed bag. Some were decent, others I spent 15 minutes getting the back flat. After that, I queued up the Veritas guide and they are all slap your grandma sharp now.

The plane blade had a flat spot close to the edge, unfortunately. In my frustration, I slipped and put a nice gash in my finger. So now I'm sitting here with a gob of super glue holding the two halves of my finger together, and it looks like my therapy session will have to wait for another night.

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post #23 of 34 Old 01-24-2018, 08:01 PM
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OOOPs

For you hand tool guys, maybe Saw Stop will come out with a flesh sensing gizmo .....

I have cut myself way more times on hand tools than I ever have on spinning cutter or blades.... about 100 to zero.
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post #24 of 34 Old 01-25-2018, 09:06 AM
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Here are some words of advise for @AmishElectricCompany:

* Getting used blades flat and sharp may take much longer than one evening. I have invested many hours working on one plane blade alone, and it still has a hollow and a non-flat back, but it is getting closer to being done.

* A blade may be way too dull for woodworking, but it is as sharp as heck for cutting fingers.

* Another way to hurt your fingers is by burning them on the diamond plate as you grind your blades back and forth on the plate. Your fingertip may press on the plate and get burned. DAMHIK.

* I am using similar DMT diamond plates. I bought the two-sided versions and I also bought the extra extra course plate for initial flattening. Even with that very very course plate, it takes a long time to flatten the backs of old plane and chisel blades.
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post #25 of 34 Old 01-25-2018, 09:38 AM
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They call it a "sander" but ......

I use a 6' X 48" belt sander for sharpening and flattening my plane blades and chisels. I've used it to flatten the bottoms of most of my handplanes. It saves so much time and "burnt" fingers and since you can change the belts to progressive finer grits you get a nice finish as well. I also sharpen my drill bits from 3/4" dia. down to about 3/16" using a drill sharpening jig. My sander rarely sees any wood, but it's there when I need it.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/6-x-48-Belt...QAAOSwImRaZgGz
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post #26 of 34 Old 01-25-2018, 01:27 PM
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For you hand tool guys, maybe Saw Stop will come out with a flesh sensing gizmo .....

I have cut myself way more times on hand tools than I ever have on spinning cutter or blades.... about 100 to zero.
I worked for many years on some pretty big printing iron, more operators spent time off on workers comp with cuts by exacto knives than from injuries by the machinery.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #27 of 34 Old 01-25-2018, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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Back at it tonight...probably had an hour and half invested in getting that plane blade flat. The rest was easy. Very happy with the Veritas honing guide.

Now I'm jazzed. It's time to start building my workbench!
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post #28 of 34 Old 01-26-2018, 08:28 AM
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Take it to the next level with a strop (Paul Sellers method) 30 to 50 strokes. Compare before and after with a loupe 10x magnifier and you will never go back.
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post #29 of 34 Old 01-26-2018, 12:27 PM
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When stropping, I usually strop 100 times each side. I hate counting to 100 then 100 again. I have found a less tiring way to strop, I will strop 14 times each side then 13, 12, 11 and etc down to zero, that is over 100 times each side. Works for me. One more thing, don't put a tremendous amount of pressure on the blade to leather, too much pressure can roll the edge of the blade. JMHO
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post #30 of 34 Old 01-26-2018, 03:10 PM
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I watch the whole sharpening progress with a 10X magnifier.
If I've come from 1500 grit, 10-15 licks on the CrOx strop evens out the edge and more work adds nothing.
Just need to be careful that I don't nick the end of my nose!!!!
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post #31 of 34 Old 01-26-2018, 04:00 PM
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Subscribing for future reference.
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post #32 of 34 Old 08-23-2018, 11:58 PM
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What sandpaper do I need?

I've been reading (researching) this post and am a NEW member. I'm used to doing millwork and stuff and have done a lot of things on shapers mainly, but also moulders and all manner of wood products manufacturing. I've worked with wood ever since I made a coaster car out of scraps of 2x4's and skinned my behind when it came apart on me halfway down the hill!


Long story short, I'm now pushing 70 and still playing with wood.


I know how much more pleasureable it is to use tools that are clean and Sharp! I need to know the recommended grits that I need to hone my tools to the fine edge that you fellows obviously know how to achieve and thanks in advance for heading me down the right path.
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post #33 of 34 Old 08-24-2018, 05:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homestd View Post
I've been reading (researching) this post and am a NEW member. I'm used to doing millwork and stuff and have done a lot of things on shapers mainly, but also moulders and all manner of wood products manufacturing. I've worked with wood ever since I made a coaster car out of scraps of 2x4's and skinned my behind when it came apart on me halfway down the hill!


Long story short, I'm now pushing 70 and still playing with wood.


I know how much more pleasureable it is to use tools that are clean and Sharp! I need to know the recommended grits that I need to hone my tools to the fine edge that you fellows obviously know how to achieve and thanks in advance for heading me down the right path.
I recommend this diamond plate for beginners because it's cheap, is a good size for plane irons, and has held up well for me so far. After the plate, I use a leather strop with polishing compound. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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post #34 of 34 Old 08-24-2018, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homestd View Post
I've been reading (researching) this post and am a NEW member. I'm used to doing millwork and stuff and have done a lot of things on shapers mainly, but also moulders and all manner of wood products manufacturing. I've worked with wood ever since I made a coaster car out of scraps of 2x4's and skinned my behind when it came apart on me halfway down the hill!


Long story short, I'm now pushing 70 and still playing with wood.


I know how much more pleasureable it is to use tools that are clean and Sharp! I need to know the recommended grits that I need to hone my tools to the fine edge that you fellows obviously know how to achieve and thanks in advance for heading me down the right path.
Wet/dry paper, i like the Rhynowet Redline brand, in grits ranging from 220 (to start on really rough edged) up to 2500 grit (final bit of mirror polish). Dont succumb to the urge to skip grits steps either, it doesnt work well. For a beat-up old chisel or whatnot your start at 220, then 320-400-800-1000-2000-2500. For something that still has a decent edge, you could very easily start at 400 or 800, and work up from there.

Youll also need a flat surface to attach the paper to. Some guys recommend a cutoff from a granite counter, but theres no guarantee that that will be flat. You might get lucky, and depending on how friendly your local stone-cutter is you might get it free, but personally id rather spend $20 and KNOW its flat:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-...No-Ledge/G9647

Overkill? Massively, but worth it. Dead flat surface, damn near indestructible, plus it wont move around while youre sharpening on it. Countertop piece will work fine, mind you, but if youre like me and live right next to a Grizzly showroom, why not?

Chisels, plane blades and the like also benefit from having a precise and repeatable way to set the angle for sharpening. By hand might work for the old-timers, but i prefer jigs. I like the Veritas jig:
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...,43078&p=51868

Pricey, but again makes the process so much better. There are cheaper jigs out there, but none (that i know of) that make setting the angle quite as quick and easy.

So, to surmise, to start sharpening youll need:
- Few different grits of wet/dry sandpaper
- Flat surface to stick the sandpaper to
- Way to set the edge angle

Really you could get yourself set up to sharpen with sandpaper for about $20. Even with all the fancy bits that make everything nicer but arent necessary, youll still come out cheaper than one of those fancy diamond plates

I need cheaper hobby
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