Scraper plane, Stanley No. 12 1/2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 09-29-2017, 01:04 PM Thread Starter
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Scraper plane, Stanley No. 12 1/2

At a luthier's convention in Tacoma last July I picked up a scraper plane on a whim. Today I had occasion to fish it out and try it on a project and was pretty impressed. Now I think I want to clean it up and make it attractive as well as useful. I welcome any perspective or ideas. Clearly, one can spend more time and effort on something like this than there is value in the tool, but... :-)
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post #2 of 16 Old 09-29-2017, 07:23 PM
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I recently learned a trick from a Starrett customer support person, when my combination square started to rust. She suggested using green Scotch Brite pads with 3-in-1 oil to clean them up. I bought a six pack of Scotch Brite Heavy Duty Scour Pads at Home Depot for $5. Combined with the oil, they worked like a charm. I have used them to clean off the rust and cruft from many hand tools, including hand planes. They work great.

Keep in mind that different Scotch Brite pads can be more or less abrasive. The ones I got at Home Depot are quite abrasive and leave a scratchy, powdery residue. An air hose and a stiff nylon brush might be helpful to clean up the abrasive powder. I read somewhere that some Scotch Brite pads are impregnated with corundum / aluminum oxide. (I am sorry, but I can't locate the source.) It is the same stuff they use on some types of sandpaper. Those Scotch Brite pads can put scratches on polished metal surfaces.

In addition, I just learned about Renaissance Wax, which protects hand tools after you clean them up. It works well for me.

I hope this helps.
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post #3 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 11:01 AM Thread Starter
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Okay, beaten by my ignorance again...

After poking around on the internet some I discovered that the scraping plane that I have had a Rosewood sole. That explains the four holes through the cast base. I wonder how one would go about obtaining a Rosewood sole for this plane or if there is a way to make one.

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post #4 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 11:19 AM
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Web info says it was 3/8" thick. Here's a picture of the bottom of one -



And apparently the same casting with 13/16" thick rosewood sole was a 12-3/4

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan3.htm

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post #5 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 02:56 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you! I hunted around and found this pic as well. Hoping to hear from someone regarding how the wooden sole screws onto the base.
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post #6 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 04:24 PM
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If you check the supertool link I posted you'll see a pic of the sole attachment screws. Looks like some sort of threaded insert was used in the sole.

For a practical alternative, flat head screws from the bottom and washers/nuts on top would work.

Dave in CT, USA

Last edited by Maylar; 10-02-2017 at 04:27 PM.
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post #7 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
Web info says it was 3/8" thick. Here's a picture of the bottom of one -



And apparently the same casting with 13/16" thick rosewood sole was a 12-3/4

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan3.htm

Oh man that pretty!

“Maybe there’s only a dark road up ahead. But you still have to believe and keep going. Believe that the stars will light your path, even a little bit.” – Kaori Miyazono -Your Lie in April. Legitimately my favorite anime.
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post #8 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 11:02 PM Thread Starter
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Oh man that pretty!
Thanks for the website supertool.com. From what I can discern, 4 machine screws screw into some sort of a brass threaded insert that is in the wood. I have never done anything like that and have no idea. Welcome any input from somebody who knows what this means.

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post #9 of 16 Old 10-02-2017, 11:58 PM
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Originally Posted by ChuckBarnett View Post
Thanks for the website supertool.com. From what I can discern, 4 machine screws screw into some sort of a brass threaded insert that is in the wood. I have never done anything like that and have no idea. Welcome any input from somebody who knows what this means.

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"Maylar" actually posted the site name, not trying to be rude but I don't want to take credit for advice I didn't give.

“Maybe there’s only a dark road up ahead. But you still have to believe and keep going. Believe that the stars will light your path, even a little bit.” – Kaori Miyazono -Your Lie in April. Legitimately my favorite anime.
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post #10 of 16 Old 10-03-2017, 10:33 AM Thread Starter
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Yeah, replying from my cellphone is confusing to Chuck... I realize there are two options in the word "reply". Good spot.
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post #11 of 16 Old 10-03-2017, 03:44 PM
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Brass threaded inserts can be had from the hardware vendors, I'm guessing a #8 or #10 will be right for you (check the hole size in the sole), but they're usually 1/2" long so you'll have to be creative. Or maybe just epoxy a square nut in recessed holes in the sole. The forces working on the sole won't be trying to pull it off the plane.

But if it was mine and I wanted to use it, I'd do flatheads from underneath.

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post #12 of 16 Old 10-03-2017, 05:35 PM Thread Starter
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Brass threaded inserts can be had from the hardware vendors, I'm guessing a #8 or #10 will be right for you (check the hole size in the sole), but they're usually 1/2" long so you'll have to be creative. Or maybe just epoxy a square nut in recessed holes in the sole. The forces working on the sole won't be trying to pull it off the plane.

But if it was mine and I wanted to use it, I'd do flatheads from underneath.
That may be the best direction for me.

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post #13 of 16 Old 10-12-2017, 02:28 PM
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Your question piqued my interest, so I took mine apart. Looks like self-tapping screws straight into the (probably Brazilian) rosewood. My base is 5/16" thick. Didn't even clean up the wood that was driven out by the screws. Not a particularly elegant attachment...
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post #14 of 16 Old 10-12-2017, 03:54 PM
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Your question piqued my interest, so I took mine apart. Looks like self-tapping screws straight into the (probably Brazilian) rosewood. My base is 5/16" thick. Didn't even clean up the wood that was driven out by the screws. Not a particularly elegant attachment...
Yours was likely replaced. Photos I've seen clearly show machine screws and some sort of insert, that was perhaps pinned:


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post #15 of 16 Old 10-12-2017, 05:53 PM
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That's the sole from a 12 3/4 Scraper plane. Patrick's B&G has the following verbiage along with the phot you posted.

"The rosewood blocks are held to the main casting via screws, as the #12 1/2 does. However, the screws used on the #12 3/4 differ from those used on the #12 1/2. The former uses flat-headed screws while the latter uses round-headed ones. Now here's something not many guys know - the screws are the same (thread, length, and head diameter) as those used on the Bailey bench planes. Ain't it amazing what information is contained within Blood & Gore? Now you're an instant expert, or maybe you just look like one, without your having sent away for a tool diploma offered by some matchbook cover correspondance school."
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post #16 of 16 Old 10-12-2017, 05:56 PM
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Should have added Patricks next paragraph to the above:

"The screws do not screw into the wood directly, but into brass bushings, which are pinned into the wood in the same manner that was used on the transitional bench planes. This feature cannot be seen unless the wood is removed from the main casting."
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