Rust pits - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 03:01 PM Thread Starter
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Rust pits

Like many here I'm always on the lookout for old tools, especially planes and chisels, that I can restore for my own use and enjoyment. Last weekend I found an old seriously rusty no-name plane at a swap meet. It appeared to be complete, all the pieces accounted for, so I figured worst case it would be good for parts and well worth the $1 price tag.

A couple of days ago I disassembled the plane and put all the metal parts to soak in rust remover. The tote and knob look to be in good condition, so I'll just strip and refinish them. This morning I pulled the parts out and started cleaning. Everything looks better than I had actually expected (still no name, just "Made in USA", but it looks like a Stanley #5 copy), but there is quite a bit of rust pitting on the body sides and sole. I think most of that will polish out pretty easily, but there is one significant (i.e., large) pit in the center of the sole, about 2" back from the front edge. It's about 1/4" across and several thousandths deep and would take a lot of polishing to remove. I can and will do that if necessary, but it occurred to me that there might be an easier alternative. Is there any metal-repair compound that could be used to fill the pit and then polished down flat with the surrounding surface? Perhaps some sort of epoxy?

Any ideas?
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 03:59 PM
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As long as you have good metal at the toe, in front and back of mouth, and heal, you should be good. Pitting usually doesn't cause any issues as long at the sole is flat. Doesn't have to be smooth. If you just want to try something, JB Weld or bondo are commonly discussed options. Bondo might work better, but would look worse. I'm rooting for you trying JB Weld, because I've wondered how it would work but not had the courage to try it. My main concern would be a piece coming lose and gouging whatever I was working on.
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 05:57 PM
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The pitting is there and nothing you do is going to have any effect other than cosmetic. Just leave it alone and you will be fine.


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post #4 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 09:47 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by JohnTC View Post
...My main concern would be a piece coming lose and gouging whatever I was working on.
Hmm... I hadn't considered that risk. Guess I'll just leave it as is. FWIW, I finished the cleanup and sharpened the blade and it cuts quite nicely.
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 10:22 PM
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Not real cheap, but:

http://www.moglice.com/moglice.html

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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LOL! Looks interesting, but by their formula I would need about 0.02 grams for the pit; doubt they sell such tiny amounts.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-12-2018, 11:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PPBART View Post
Like many here I'm always on the lookout for old tools, especially planes and chisels, that I can restore for my own use and enjoyment. Last weekend I found an old seriously rusty no-name plane at a swap meet. It appeared to be complete, all the pieces accounted for, so I figured worst case it would be good for parts and well worth the $1 price tag.

A couple of days ago I disassembled the plane and put all the metal parts to soak in rust remover. The tote and knob look to be in good condition, so I'll just strip and refinish them. This morning I pulled the parts out and started cleaning. Everything looks better than I had actually expected (still no name, just "Made in USA", but it looks like a Stanley #5 copy), but there is quite a bit of rust pitting on the body sides and sole. I think most of that will polish out pretty easily, but there is one significant (i.e., large) pit in the center of the sole, about 2" back from the front edge. It's about 1/4" across and several thousandths deep and would take a lot of polishing to remove. I can and will do that if necessary, but it occurred to me that there might be an easier alternative. Is there any metal-repair compound that could be used to fill the pit and then polished down flat with the surrounding surface? Perhaps some sort of epoxy?

Any ideas?
Unless you are painting the repair areas I would leave it alone. What ever you put on it will stick out like a sore thumb. If you are going to do it I would recommend PC7 epoxy. It will stay and at least be dark in color.
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-13-2018, 05:51 AM
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https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/Cargo-Quiks...2987485&chn=ps


Lots of similar brands available.
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-13-2018, 11:21 AM
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I agree with JohnTC's first sentence, and GeorgeC's comment. Another thing I have done is to sand the sole with a bench top belt sander to flatten the sole and remove the pitting all together.

Gary
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