Restoring vintage Stanley #7 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 03-25-2019, 07:37 AM Thread Starter
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Hi guys. I won an auction with a 1925-1928 Stanley no7. It's pretty rusty. What's a good method for restoring? I was planning on either soaking in vinegar or rust remover. I think the black paint is still in good shape, but if not, is there a specific type I need to look for, or will any black paint (spray?) Do? Getting the red "Stanley" back on the lever cap... Tape the whole thing off and cut out the letters with a scalpel? Flattening the base if needed... Can I do this on a belt sander, or since there's no guarantee that's flat, should I find some granite or something?
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post #2 of 10 Old 03-25-2019, 09:14 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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I use Evaporust .....

Evaporust from Harbor Freight or Auto zone works well and leaves a nice dark color on cast iron. I don't know about vinegar, either white or cider, both mildly acidic. You will need a long rectangular tray, cardboard lined with visqueen will work OR a fish baker or long bread baking tray. A drywall tray works OK for shorter planes.



As far as the black "paint" goes it's baked on at the factory, called Japaning. Whether to use spray paint, enamel from a can or other is up to you:
https://mvflaim.wordpress.com/2011/0...nning-a-plane/


other sources:
https://www.google.com/search?client...30.FYuJf2v0Wic



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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-25-2019 at 09:32 AM.
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post #3 of 10 Old 03-25-2019, 06:08 PM
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Evaporust or the WD-40 rust remover are good options. Engine paint is a good substitute for expensive japanning.

"The kind of man who wants the government to adopt and enforce his ideas is always the kind of man whose ideas are idiotic." -H.L. Mencken
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post #4 of 10 Old 03-25-2019, 07:16 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Evaporust from Harbor Freight or Auto zone works well and leaves a nice dark color on cast iron. I don't know about vinegar, either white or cider, both mildly acidic. You will need a long rectangular tray, cardboard lined with visqueen will work OR a fish baker or long bread baking tray. A drywall tray works OK for shorter planes.



As far as the black "paint" goes it's baked on at the factory, called Japaning. Whether to use spray paint, enamel from a can or other is up to you:
https://mvflaim.wordpress.com/2011/0...nning-a-plane/


other sources:
https://www.google.com/search?client...30.FYuJf2v0Wic



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I was actually thinking about using a 4"diameter pvc tube capped at one end. Feel like that would be the best return on usable volume as a soaking vessel.

How long should I soak it?
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post #5 of 10 Old 03-25-2019, 07:16 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnTC View Post
Evaporust or the WD-40 rust remover are good options. Engine paint is a good substitute for expensive japanning.
Engine paint! Thanks.
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post #6 of 10 Old 03-25-2019, 08:34 PM
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Pvc ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhaugle View Post
I was actually thinking about using a 4"diameter pvc tube capped at one end. Feel like that would be the best return on usable volume as a soaking vessel.

How long should I soak it?

The end will need to be glued on or it will leak. ... ...
The pipe would need to be filled to the end of the plane, that's quite a lot of solution in my mind. An open top container would be better. I soak mine stuff overnight using "fresh" solution. Older or used solution is less effective.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 10 Old 03-26-2019, 07:57 AM
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Congratualtions on your new plane

Evapo-rust is an excellent rust remover for this purpose. I have used it for successful restoration of old planes. I prefer mechanical removal, but that requires specialized equipment that is not worth the investment for a few planes. DO NOT USE A BELT SANDER! Granted a large plane like a No. 7 IS going to be a lot of work to hand lap, but there are many reasons to not use a sander. As you mentioned, your sander is not flat enough. The contact bed is also only about 4” vs the 21 1/2”-22” sole of you plane. Most importantly, the belt sander will rapidly, and unevenly heat the sole of the plane causing measurable distortion. You are then removing material out of “plane” with a flat sole. As the plane cools, it returns to original position and you now have low spots that are even more difficult to remove. As soon as the plane is warm to the touch from a power sander, you are working on distorted sole.

Lap the sole with abrasive paper on a flat surface, table saw, glass plate, polished granite (check that these are flat to your desired outcome). Best to have knob, tote, and frog installed. I would disagree with the idea these items must be installed for the plane to be flat under tension, but they make good handholds for lapping. See how out of true it is, then determine how to correct it. Once you determine you have areas that require attention, work with course abrasive, 80 grit or courser (I have used 30 grit when necessary), until you have full contact. Then proceed to finer grits, small jumps, until you reach your desired finish. For most this is 120 grit (you can polish to what ever level you prefer. I am a nut, and polish plane soles and cheeks to 8000 grit or higher, producing near mirror finishes that I enjoy and that are less rust prone). Each time you move to finer grit, you must have full contact with preceding grit or you will spend an enormous amount of time trying to remove the marks from the prior step.

Porter-Cable makes some fantastic, self adhesive sandpaper for the task. You will have more than you need for several planes, but the roll paper is much easier for working on larger planes. Available in various grits.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000223SI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

For finish, the closest you can get to original japanning is Duplicolor Ford Semi-gloss black, DE1635. Available at most automotive supply stores. Use a good quality, black primer first. If you want a smooth finish, you will have to remove any remaining, original japanning. Household paint strippers may do the job.

Remember, you are working on a tool that has already lasted two lifetimes, and will serve several more if you invest the time and effort. Stripping the plane of rust and finish will take several days. Lapping may take a total of 3 hours over the course of a few days (depends how you feel about mindless repetitive work (or meditative, depends on the person). Flattening and honing the cutting iron, a couple hours, lapping and fitting the chip breaker, less than an hour. The joy of running a beautifully restored, well tuned No. 7 plane, lasts a lifetime. And the next person’s lifetime as well.
Attached Thumbnails
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Name:	STANLEY No. 3 Type 6 cir. 1888-1892 Left Front Quarter (2)-min.jpg
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Name:	STANLEY No. 3 Type 6 cir. 1888-1892 Sole (1)-min.jpg
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Name:	STANLEY No. 4 Type 9 cir. 1902-1907 Right Front Quarter (1) - Copy-min.jpg
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ID:	373585  

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Name:	STANLEY No. 4 Type 9 cir. 1902-1907 Sole (1)-min.jpg
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Name:	FULTON 3709 cir. 1941-43 Left Quarter .jpg
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Name:	FULTON 3709 cir. 1941-43 Sole.jpg
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ID:	373591  


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post #8 of 10 Old 03-26-2019, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red5hft View Post
Evapo-rust is an excellent rust remover for this purpose. I have used it for successful restoration of old planes. I prefer mechanical removal, but that requires specialized equipment that is not worth the investment for a few planes. DO NOT USE A BELT SANDER! Granted a large plane like a No. 7 IS going to be a lot of work to hand lap, but there are many reasons to not use a sander. As you mentioned, your sander is not flat enough. The contact bed is also only about 4” vs the 21 1/2”-22” sole of you plane. Most importantly, the belt sander will rapidly, and unevenly heat the sole of the plane causing measurable distortion. You are then removing material out of “plane” with a flat sole. As the plane cools, it returns to original position and you now have low spots that are even more difficult to remove. As soon as the plane is warm to the touch from a power sander, you are working on distorted sole.

Lap the sole with abrasive paper on a flat surface, table saw, glass plate, polished granite (check that these are flat to your desired outcome). Best to have knob, tote, and frog installed. I would disagree with the idea these items must be installed for the plane to be flat under tension, but they make good handholds for lapping. See how out of true it is, then determine how to correct it. Once you determine you have areas that require attention, work with course abrasive, 80 grit or courser (I have used 30 grit when necessary), until you have full contact. Then proceed to finer grits, small jumps, until you reach your desired finish. For most this is 120 grit (you can polish to what ever level you prefer. I am a nut, and polish plane soles and cheeks to 8000 grit or higher, producing near mirror finishes that I enjoy and that are less rust prone). Each time you move to finer grit, you must have full contact with preceding grit or you will spend an enormous amount of time trying to remove the marks from the prior step.

Porter-Cable makes some fantastic, self adhesive sandpaper for the task. You will have more than you need for several planes, but the roll paper is much easier for working on larger planes. Available in various grits.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

For finish, the closest you can get to original japanning is Duplicolor Ford Semi-gloss black, DE1635. Available at most automotive supply stores. Use a good quality, black primer first. If you want a smooth finish, you will have to remove any remaining, original japanning. Household paint strippers may do the job.

Remember, you are working on a tool that has already lasted two lifetimes, and will serve several more if you invest the time and effort. Stripping the plane of rust and finish will take several days. Lapping may take a total of 3 hours over the course of a few days (depends how you feel about mindless repetitive work (or meditative, depends on the person). Flattening and honing the cutting iron, a couple hours, lapping and fitting the chip breaker, less than an hour. The joy of running a beautifully restored, well tuned No. 7 plane, lasts a lifetime. And the next person’s lifetime as well.
Great info. Thank you! I'm currently redoing my garage set up, but once that is done, I will work on the plane. Before and after pics to come... eventually
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post #9 of 10 Old 03-27-2019, 08:42 AM
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Just a quick shoutout to Greg (@Red5hft) for his superb write-up about restoring hand planes. The specific details are priceless, especially the way he sets expectations about how much time each step should take.

I have several planes in various stages of restoration. Greg's post is so helpful to me, and probably many others who will find it in the coming years. Thank you!
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post #10 of 10 Old 05-08-2019, 04:46 PM
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There are dozens of videos on youTube on hand plane restoration.
Careful, fixing up old planes is an addiction.

Allen
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