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post #1 of 18 Old 09-22-2015, 10:03 PM Thread Starter
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Pricey rasps

Howdy, Have any of you bought an expensive rasp or coarse file? I was at Woodcraft today and saw they want about $45 for a rasp. I can't imagine it is worth it, but the cheap ones dull pretty quick with hard wood.

Have you found a brand that holds a decent edge - rasp or coarse file? Thanks.
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post #2 of 18 Old 09-22-2015, 10:40 PM
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If it's a Nicholson #49 or #50 It's worth it. If not look elsewere.

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post #3 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 01:08 AM
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Partly that and partly that the hand-stitched rasps have a random pattern which doesn't leave grooved tracks from repeated strokes. Maybe this isn't an issue but in wood carving it is. If you have to use the rasp a lot, you need to think of other ways to hog off excess wood with less tool wear.

I use a coping saw, cut fins and bash them off with a 1" flat chisel. Only then do I use my rasps as shaping tools. Liogere and Ariou when I can afford them.
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post #4 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 03:16 AM
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I can't comment on the fancy ones, but if you're just looking for recommendations I'd go for the cheap ones over the expensive ones. You can go through 20 $5 surform rasps for the price of 1 ariou rasp

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post #5 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 06:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeanStuart View Post
Howdy, Have any of you bought an expensive rasp or coarse file? I was at Woodcraft today and saw they want about $45 for a rasp. I can't imagine it is worth it, but the cheap ones dull pretty quick with hard wood.

Have you found a brand that holds a decent edge - rasp or coarse file? Thanks.
Where in the Sandhills are you located? I grew up in Southern Pines.

George
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post #6 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 06:11 PM Thread Starter
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Where in the Sandhills are you located? I grew up in Southern Pines.

George
I am right next door in Pinehurst. Funny thing George, I grew up in Florida! Not the panhandle though, down in Sarasota.

Southern Pines is really nice. My wife an I go to the Saturday morning farmers' market and walk up and down Broad Street with the dog sometimes. They have done a nice job of preserving the downtown area.
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post #7 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 06:14 PM Thread Starter
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Partly that and partly that the hand-stitched rasps have a random pattern which doesn't leave grooved tracks from repeated strokes. Maybe this isn't an issue but in wood carving it is. If you have to use the rasp a lot, you need to think of other ways to hog off excess wood with less tool wear.

I use a coping saw, cut fins and bash them off with a 1" flat chisel. Only then do I use my rasps as shaping tools. Liogere and Ariou when I can afford them.
I have been making a few wooden bows lately and when I use the saw, I tend to take too much off too quickly. Plus with the odd shape, it is hard to use a saw.
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post #8 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 06:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
I can't comment on the fancy ones, but if you're just looking for recommendations I'd go for the cheap ones over the expensive ones. You can go through 20 $5 surform rasps for the price of 1 ariou rasp
I agree epicfail. I do that same calculation each time I look at high end stuff. But two thoughts:
1. It is nice to use a quality tool.
2. It is a pain to buy replacement stuff often. I like to buy something and use it for a long time, take care of it, know where it is, etc.

So sometimes, if I know I'll use it a lot, I will pay the price.
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post #9 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 06:26 PM Thread Starter
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If it's a Nicholson #49 or #50 It's worth it. If not look elsewere.
The Nicholson 14" Farrier rasp looks nice. It is $22 on Amazon.

What is the difference (other than the handle) between a farrier's rasp and a woodworkers rasp?
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post #10 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
I can't comment on the fancy ones, but if you're just looking for recommendations I'd go for the cheap ones over the expensive ones. You can go through 20 $5 surform rasps for the price of 1 ariou rasp
+1: I agree. Any rasp, new, used, expensive or cheap is made for rough work. You can quickly take a corner off with a rasp, but it's rough and we come back to finish, smooth or put the final shape with something much less abrasive. I own several rasps and use them, but all my rasp together probably did not cost me $45.
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post #11 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 09:49 PM
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I have a scrap bin full of cheap rasps and files, try a hand made one from either of these places;

http://www.forge-de-saint-juery.com/...asps-for-wood/

http://www.hand-stitched-rasp-riffler.com

They might be available at Lie-Neilsen

Jack
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post #12 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 10:04 PM
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I'd get the nicholsons,price is about right
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post #13 of 18 Old 09-23-2015, 11:03 PM
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Originally Posted by SeanStuart View Post
I agree epicfail. I do that same calculation each time I look at high end stuff. But two thoughts:
1. It is nice to use a quality tool.
2. It is a pain to buy replacement stuff often. I like to buy something and use it for a long time, take care of it, know where it is, etc.

So sometimes, if I know I'll use it a lot, I will pay the price.
I can agree with both those points, but even a high quality rasp isnt going to be a one time purchase. Over time the teeth are going to get dull, no matter how high the quality.

Besides, disposable != low quality.

http://www.amazon.com/MICROPLANE-SNA...0_SR160%2C160_

Good quality rasp, and replacing the blade is as simple as popping the dull one out and popping a new, sharp replacement in, and the replacement blades are only $10 a piece.

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etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #14 of 18 Old 09-24-2015, 03:03 AM
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On a budget man here

If you're in a hurry to get something now ignore this...

Almost all my handtools have come from yard sales, thrift stores, estate sales, and antique/junk stores. For a haggle and a few bucks I usually walk away wi th a fistful, if not a box full of files, rasps, plane blades n parts, circ saw blades, router bits, old hand saws, drill bits, augers, whatever.

The stuff thats in good shape gets used as is or maybe a new handle. The worn out files, for example go in a drawer for when i need good tool steel for makin special purpose odds n ends, like for matching old moldings etc.

Prolly have near 100 usable files and rasps of nearly every shape n size thats ever been made. And I doubt I've spent more than $100 over the years on em. And thats just the decent ones.

If it ain't broke, it'll cost too much.

Form follows function... Unless my wife wants it pretty, then... Form is function
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post #15 of 18 Old 09-24-2015, 02:24 PM
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I estimate that I have and use 6-8 small hand-saw sorts of things for wood carving roughouts. I'll measure pencil marks on a toothpick to use as a depth gauge. I stop 1/4" above the "line."

Then I work with a rasp (maybe). The true advantage is that the rasp does not leave coarse sand grains behind, embedded in the wood = no gouge damage any more!

A very different and successful approach is to cut with such things as an elbow adze or a D adze, common and popular wood working tools here in the Pacific Northwest, particularly with the native carving communities. I use both, they make sense to me.

http://www.kestreltool.com/ is a blade smith, both blades and finished tools.
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post #16 of 18 Old 09-26-2015, 09:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daddy0h
If you're in a hurry to get something now ignore this... Almost all my handtools have come from yard sales, thrift stores, estate sales, and antique/junk stores. For a haggle and a few bucks I usually walk away wi th a fistful, if not a box full of files, rasps, plane blades n parts, circ saw blades, router bits, old hand saws, drill bits, augers, whatever. The stuff thats in good shape gets used as is or maybe a new handle. The worn out files, for example go in a drawer for when i need good tool steel for makin special purpose odds n ends, like for matching old moldings etc. Prolly have near 100 usable files and rasps of nearly every shape n size thats ever been made. And I doubt I've spent more than $100 over the years on em. And thats just the decent ones.
I check out estate sails all the time and have built a nice collection of files and rasps. I am pretty selective about what I add to the collection but for the most partI find a lot of once or lightly used stuff.

-my pencil is the most cost effective tool I ever bought.
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post #17 of 18 Old 10-29-2015, 05:04 PM
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I bought a hand-hammered rasp and it's worth every penny. The surface it creates is so much smoother than anything a factory pattern leaves. It depends a bit on what you want to do with it of course.
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post #18 of 18 Old 10-30-2015, 02:03 AM
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Factory patterns are machine stitched in regularity, as I said before. Your math is incorrect if you claim that 10 x $5 rasps are better than a single good one. Steel trumps wood, every time.

Just today, I saw a new brand of farrier's rasp which is machine stitched but zig-zag every inch or so.
Must have a closer look at that but for wood carving = rasp on one side, file on the other. The changes in the pattern might just leave a smoother surface. I won't guess. Maybe buy one and try. Cost you $10 for an answer.

Trust me: if you are the farrier trusted to work on a million-dollar horse, you won't be messing around with a $10 rasp.
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