Planes - flea market find - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 01-23-2018, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Planes - flea market find

I found these planes at a flea market while on vacation a little while ago. I flattened the soles with a No, 5 plane taking just thin passes until they were flat and square. Then I sharpened the irons with oil stones.




The wooden plane was manufactured circa 1890 - 1905. I used tung oil and steel wool to clean it up. I am having trouble learning how to make adjustments. I tap too hard ot too lightly. Once I get it set to where I want it, I tap the wedge, and it drives the iron too far down. I am getting better, but it is a learning process.

The transition plane was manufactured circa 1895 - 1919. By the markings on the sole, I estimate this particular one was made between 1915 and 1919. I was going to repaint it, but after cleaning it up with a scrubbing brush and putting oil on it, it looked just fine as a shop tool. So the only thing done on the metal top was to clean it and oil it. The adjustment has a left hand thread, so it operates backwards from my Stanley planes. I just have to remember to turn the adjustment opposite from what I normally do. I find that it planes very nicely and has good heft and will take a paper thin shaving.
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post #2 of 10 Old 01-23-2018, 10:10 PM
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Your planes look to be in good shape. The plane in the center picture has all the modern features of current planes in a wooden body. Wooden bodied planes are still used in Europe and other countries.
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #3 of 10 Old 01-24-2018, 07:51 PM
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After cleaning/shaving the sole of a wood plane you should use boiled linseed oil thinned with turpentine to keep the wood in good condition. Let it dry for several days, then wax the sole with bees wax before using and during use, and they will glide when you use them.
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post #4 of 10 Old 01-29-2018, 09:49 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you. I have looked at several flea market wooden planes and none appear to be as tight and well taken care of as these. These have no cracks in the wood bodies,
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post #5 of 10 Old 01-30-2018, 09:12 AM
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Piper, I have made several wooden hand planes (about 15), some from construction grade 2 x 4s. They all work great when they are dialed in. I have made hollows and rounds (side escapement), snipe planes, Rabet planes, Grooving planes, matched Tonge and Groove planes, even skewed planes. One small plane that I use quite often uses a Bi-metal sawzall blade for the iron. They are all finished with a boiled linseed oil/turpentine mixture because after much reading on the subject, was used at least for a millennium. My understanding is that it is an oil that after it dries (the turpentine vents off), it hardens yet keeps the wood stable. That is probably why wood planes 100 years old have little or no checking. You flood the oil to let it penetrate the wood, then after several hours wipe the excess, and let it dry for several days. after that you can coat the plane with shellac. Later if you need to re finish, you simply use denatured alcohol to remove the finish and re do the process again.

What it really comes down to is learning to sharpen the iron is the key to any plane working well. If you learn to sharpen by first flattening the back side to a polished flat surface, you will be able hone and strop the bevel to a polished edge that gives you an extremely keen edge. Using a 10x magnifying Loupe while sharpening will show your progress and you will see how by removing the scratch marks on both the flat side and the bevel edge will give you the keenest edge, which is a pleasure to use in any plane.

Last edited by gmercer_48083; 01-30-2018 at 09:28 AM.
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post #6 of 10 Old 01-31-2018, 02:02 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you gmercer_48083.
I would like to make some wood planes in the future and would like to make some with profiles and some grooving planes to make a groove to accept a panel. I am surprised about the construction 2x4 planes. What pine planes have you made and how do they hold up? From where do you obtain the irons? I was thinking of cutting a plane iron to produce a grooving iron. I was also thinking of using a 1/4 inch chisel iron as a blade. I would also like to make an ogee profile to complement the groove like a door panel.

What suggestions can you offer or resources can you recommend in making these type planes. I have seen some YouTube videos such as Paul Sellers. I recently obtained a small kiln capable of thousands of degrees which I would like to temper and harden the irons.

I am having a difficult time adjusting the wooden plane to the thickness I need. I either go too far, or am too light, then over-adjust and need to start over. I spoke with a craftsman at Colonial Williamsburg and he offered to work with me to help teach me to use and adjust the plane. I will be taking it with me next month when I visit Colonial Williamsburg and I will try to find him or another craftsman from the carpenter/furniture/joinery shop who would be willing to spend a few minutes with me.

Thank you for your advise. to date I have only oiled the plane, so it is ready to receive another coat of oil and turpentine. I have rubbed bees wax onto the sole.
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post #7 of 10 Old 02-01-2018, 10:18 AM
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Piper, I had purchased an antique side escapement rounding plane about 10 years ago and after much research on the internet decided to duplicate it. That's where I started. I found I could make this type of plane using my table saw instead of drilling and filing to make it. After making many planes, I recommend starting with a rebate plane. It will give you the basic skill needed to begin making other various types of side escapement planes. There are two other things I made on the way to accomplish making these planes. The first is a jig that can cut the wedges to a precise 10 degree angle for the wedges. it's made using 1/2" mdf that is hot glued together, and hold downs added in order to cut the wedges. I have made all my wedges using this jig (including skewed wedges at 10 degrees). I made my 2 x 4 rebate plane and gave it to a good friend, just to show him how well it works. The second thing I made was a hand router plane that uses an Allen wrench that is ground narrow, in order to clean out the waste wood in the hand plane body for the wedge to a precise depth. I saw the bed angles into the hand plane using my table saw, then clean out the waste with the hand router. The picture shown here is the second rebate plane I made from Hard Maple and it uses a 1/8" x 1/2" (O1) steel iron. I then grind the bevel. The steel is Starrett brand, which I heat to Dull Red with a propane torch, and quench in canola oil. I then anneal the iron in the oven at 400 degrees for 1 hour, then sharpen on diamond, then strop to a keen edge. In the pictures you can see the fence that is adjustable on the bottom to size the rebate up to 1/2" cut. I highly recommend that if anyone wants to start out making there own wooden planes... that you start here. On at note: I know my planes will last at least for the rest of my life...Who knows, maybe a hundred years?
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post #8 of 10 Old 02-02-2018, 09:28 AM
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Piper, I documented my making of laminated hollows and rounds. It is a pdf file (53 pages with photos). With this file you can see step by step, how I did it. The profile on the sole could be shaped (altered) ...to be used as a molding plane. I still recommend that you start out by making a rebate plane as your first attempt. Here is the file, and good luck. Gary.
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post #9 of 10 Old 02-04-2018, 02:50 PM Thread Starter
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GMercer,
I cannot thank you enough for offering the detailed instructions and photos. Your PDF is superb. The angle jig you used fits right into another project I am beginning. I am meeting a friend from woodturners club to make a copy of his angle jig to make accurate angles for segmented turnings. That jig will also make perfect angles for this project. As part of that project, I am going to tune up my table saw and verify that my blade is sitting square and perpendicular to the table.

I will definitely make a plane (I bet many more than one) with your instructions.

I will also pick up some turpentine to make a BLO blend to coat the plane and shellac.

I am sure your instructions will aid many woodworkers for years to come. Thank you.
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post #10 of 10 Old 02-05-2018, 10:10 AM
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Piper, I use a digital angle finder from harbor freight (I am thrifty). I use 2 pieces of mdf (one narrower and shorter than the other). I first cut the edges parallel for the base, then lay the second piece second shorter piece of mdf on top of the base at the angle required (in my planes 10 degrees). I then put a dab of hot glue on one edge and let it cool...after letting it cool, I verify the angle with my digital angle finder, and adjust if necessary, then dab a spot of hot glue on the other end, and let it cool...I verify once again, then I lay a bead of hot glue (like a weld)to make it permanent. I then add the hold downs by drilling holes thru and counter sinking the bottom. I just use carriage bolts for mine.

When using the jig, it is guided along the fence, and pushed forward to cut the wedge.
For a rebate plane, the table saw blade is set at 0 degrees.

For a skewed plane (like a panel raising plane), you set the blade at the skewed angle (which is usually 10 to 15 degrees), and rip one edge of your wedge material to that angle, then place that angled edge against the fence of the jig, and cut the wedge at that same angle.

Panel raising (skewed) planes, should be made in matched sets... One for left and right hand. They are used both with the grain and cross grain. They (being skewed) pull toward as you use them and sometimes you need to plane in the opposite direction and that is why it's nice to have matched sets of planes (both left and right).
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