which plane to choose? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 10-05-2011, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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which plane to choose?

Hello all,

I need to take a panel's thickness down by about 1/16th of an inch. It's too wide to fit in my planer so I thought I'd remove the material with a hand plane. I like the Lie-Nielson planes but I'm not sure which one is appropriate: the No. 5 Jack Plane, the No. 6 Fore Plane, or the Low Angle Jack Plane. I know it's not a LOT of material to remove, but I'd want to buy something that would be useful for these sorts of tasks in the future when I might need to remove more or less material. I do have a No. 4 smoothing plane for cleaning up afterwards.

Thanks!

Kevin H.
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post #2 of 14 Old 10-05-2011, 08:27 PM
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I normally use my No. 5. I start going across the grain to remove most of the materials, then i go at a 45 and then finish it off with the grain.

Good luck
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post #3 of 14 Old 10-05-2011, 09:09 PM
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I use my #7 for cross grain thickness planing. Then my 4 1/2 Smoother. Before I had the 7 I used a #5 Jack Plane first.
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post #4 of 14 Old 10-10-2011, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Wrangler and Crosley,

Thanks for the replies. I think I'll get the #5 and see how it goes. I didn't realize about going across the grain first, then at 45 degrees, then finish up along the grain.

I'll try to remember to follow up once I'm done and let you know how it came out.

Thanks again,

Kevin H.
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post #5 of 14 Old 10-10-2011, 07:35 PM
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My planes are all near 100 years old. I've never found an old low angle so I've looked at Lee-Nielson and Veritas Planes. So far I am too "frugal" to spend that much money!!
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post #6 of 14 Old 10-11-2011, 05:52 AM
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planes

100s of planes for sale on evilbay. Don't waste money on a new one.
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post #7 of 14 Old 10-17-2011, 05:21 PM
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Lie nelson is the best quality plane I've come across! Heavy so the plane sits on the work peace well, blade is top quality and holds the edge for a long time! Plane handle is very comfortable to you for and extended period !
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post #8 of 14 Old 10-19-2011, 08:50 AM
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Ermm... This is the first forum I've ever joined, not sure how it all works, but to answer the question about taking the panel down to thickness, all the info on planes and techniques is good, but I'd just add that a quick run round the panel with a marking gauge first and a careful 15/20 degree chamfer down to your gauge line, will make sure that you work the board down to the right thickness, in a nice even fashion. Just a thought! All the best. If this is not good advice, someone correct me as it works for me but may not be the best method. - Simon
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post #9 of 14 Old 10-19-2011, 02:13 PM
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My approach is a bit different... I have cheapo planes that I spent time and effort tuning, with good blades / chipbreakers installed. Specifically a Groz #4, and #5 fitted with Veritas replacement irons and chip breakers. Kind of like putting a Caddy engine in a Chevy Malibu... Odd, but it works really well.

The #5 is set up so cut a hair deeper / more aggressively than the #4. and I typically reduce thickness with the #5 at around a 45 deg angle, then finish it off with the grain and the #4.

Interested in my woodworking, workshop and whatnot? See http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, want to see my other interests such as hunting, fishing, off roading, and camping? See http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com
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post #10 of 14 Old 10-19-2011, 02:13 PM
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Ooops. Double post...

Interested in my woodworking, workshop and whatnot? See http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, want to see my other interests such as hunting, fishing, off roading, and camping? See http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com

Last edited by dbhost; 10-19-2011 at 03:49 PM. Reason: Double post.
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post #11 of 14 Old 10-19-2011, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simonh-andtools
Ermm... This is the first forum I've ever joined, not sure how it all works, but to answer the question about taking the panel down to thickness, all the info on planes and techniques is good, but I'd just add that a quick run round the panel with a marking gauge first and a careful 15/20 degree chamfer down to your gauge line, will make sure that you work the board down to the right thickness, in a nice even fashion. Just a thought! All the best. If this is not good advice, someone correct me as it works for me but may not be the best method. - Simon
Sound advice if you ask me... I know, no one did

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #12 of 14 Old 10-19-2011, 04:29 PM
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The low-angle jack is the most versatle plane of the group IMO. It works great as a jack / jointer and you can use it to trim up endgrain or gnarly woods with no problems. If I were to own just one plane it would be the low-angle jack.

If you do look for a jack plane I'd buy a #5 Stanley or #14 Millers Falls plane from eBay or similar. With a little patience you can find a great plane for not much money. The #14 I have cost $12 after shipping and was almost NIB condition.
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post #13 of 14 Old 10-20-2011, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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SimonH: I like your advice about running a marking gauge around the perimeter and then a slight chamfer. Sounds like you've done this sort of thing before.

I plan to get the #5 as soon as I can scratch up a few more bucks. I'll post back and let everyone know how the panel "thinning" works out.

Thanks for all the great replies.

Kevin H.
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post #14 of 14 Old 10-20-2011, 06:10 PM
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Smile It has worked for 100's of years

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjhart0133 View Post
SimonH: I like your advice about running a marking gauge around the perimeter and then a slight chamfer. Sounds like you've done this sort of thing before.

I plan to get the #5 as soon as I can scratch up a few more bucks. I'll post back and let everyone know how the panel "thinning" works out.

Thanks for all the great replies.

Kevin H.
Hi Kevin! I have worked wood for 20 years but I recently did a hand tool course that was a total eye opener! I now know that a lot of jobs are faster and more efficient with ultra sharp, well set hand tools, and no machine can hold a candle to the finish you get. I love the tranquility of a workshop without the clutter of machines, let alone the dust! I am not an expert, but I thought I was before I started learning again from scratch. All the best. Simon
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