New life for a Stanley #8 - Page 3 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #41 of 67 Old 03-31-2014, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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Another vote..

eschatz,
Don't forget to take pics, I forget sometimes and I look back, gee which I took a pic...to late now.

I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.
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post #42 of 67 Old 04-01-2014, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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An update on the progress.

Sandpaper came in yesterday and this mourning started to lap the sole.

Started off with the 100 grit, sandpaper has it's own adhesive applied to the back.

My start was just to see how off the bottom was, and am surprised how flat it was considering the size. When lapping I have turned the plane around still lapping the same side.

Will switch to the 150 grit, after thought is, I should of started off with a 80 grit first

Really am thinking of getting a new blade for it, but will try that 5 degree back bevel.
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I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.
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post #43 of 67 Old 04-01-2014, 02:11 PM
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Good progress.

I love the custom station for the lapping/sharpening board.

The Pressure Sensitive Adhesive does stick well. Do not be surprised if the paper breaks when you want to change to fresh or another grit.
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post #44 of 67 Old 04-01-2014, 03:19 PM
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Love the wood grain on that custom made tote/knob combo, very nice Dave. As usual nice restoration Cowboy.
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post #45 of 67 Old 04-01-2014, 03:27 PM
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Looking good!

Glad to hear you are going to try the five degree back bevel. Never needed to do that myself, but I am curious to see what kind of results you get.

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #46 of 67 Old 04-02-2014, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
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I think I am finished, putting a slight bevel on the back side of the plane blade..using the ruler trick...

As for the sole.
Did a few more passes with 150 grit then move to the 220...was getting to shiny for me..

When the extra extra fine plate arrives, I will do the blade again.
I have no doubt this plane will be a good user, it is now with a blade only sharpened with 1200 grit plate.

I would like to thank everyone who commentated and gave suggestions. And to all that even looked..

And a very special thanks to Dave Paine, you have a friend here forever..
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post #47 of 67 Old 04-02-2014, 03:40 PM
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Always good to see the "action pictures" with a set of nice fluffy shavings.

Well done on a terrific restoration. The plane will now have a good second life.

I am happy to have made a new friend.

Almost sad to see this thread reach the desired conclusion.

Lets hope one of the readers is inspired enough to get started on their own restoration - and a new thread.
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post #48 of 67 Old 04-02-2014, 09:55 PM
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That came out great.
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post #49 of 67 Old 04-04-2014, 10:58 AM Thread Starter
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I will still leave this thread open, as if another frog is found may just replace it, or if I decide to switch out the blade.

Thought I better at least leave a before and after shot of this little gem.
At least to me it is.

I have tried to capture some of the grain in the tote and knob, the light play changes with every angle.
You would have to see it in your own hand.

My hat is off to you Dave..

Edit:
Thought about it.
It is done...
Last Pictures where taken after it was waxed with Min-Wax paste.

Final note to beginners, on waxing any hand-tools

"Do not use a silicon based wax or polish, this will transfer off your tools to your project,
and will affect your finishing"
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I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.

Last edited by acowboy; 04-04-2014 at 12:36 PM. Reason: Added advice
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post #50 of 67 Old 04-04-2014, 12:42 PM
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Real nice job on the plane.

Now I have a question. Has anyone used a bead blaster to clean the japanning off? Bead material is soft and not aggressive like sand or Black Beauty. I have used it to clean the rust off the sole and sides. I also have been thinking of setting up my surface grinder up to level the sole and clean up the sides. Has anyone tried this?

The last thing I want to ask has anyone tried powder coating to finish the painted areas. Powder coat is similar to the original finish in that it is sprayed on as a powder and placed in an oven and baked on. It is a very hard finish and I would think would wear as the original.

Again real nice job on the No. 8.

Paul
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post #51 of 67 Old 04-04-2014, 01:16 PM Thread Starter
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Have not used sandblasting or bead blasting, yet. So I cannot comment or advise on that.

Surface grinding I would advise against that, might be to aggressive.
You have more control on what you take off with the different options of grit secured to a known true flat surface.

It's more work, but less chance of a mess up.

Electrolysis and even soaking your plane if it is rusted will remove some of the japanning, especially where the rust is under the paint and cannot be seen.

And as far as powder coating..a nice finish..chance of plane being warped from 400+ degrees...
Yes application of japanning requires baking also, but it wont leave the factory warped...

This is just my thoughts...

And thanks for the compliment...hope to see your project..

I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.
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post #52 of 67 Old 04-04-2014, 01:37 PM
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I had a friend take a couple of my restorations into his work to use a blasting cabinet. I went along for one of the session. I think the media was small glass beads.

It takes a long time to get off the paint. Some areas did not clean up well, such as between the letters. I had to clean off these with a small screw driver.

I think a surface grinder is a bit overkill for sole flattening. It may work, but you want to be careful not to remove too much metal.

A person I used to work with sent out his hand planes to have the soles machined flat. I did not ask if this was milled or surface grinding.

I find 80 grit paper works fast. As Acowboy said, it also provides a lot of control.

Powder coat is a tough finish. I also would not want to risk putting my planes in a hot oven to cure.
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post #53 of 67 Old 04-04-2014, 07:09 PM
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Thanks for the advice. I may try surface grinding an old block plane that has a broken casting just to see what it does. If I do I'll see if I can post a picture of before and after. I have a blast cabinet that is filled with 80 grit glass bead. I used it on a couple of rusted block planes to see what it would do. I also used it on the blades they came out pretty good.

Paul
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post #54 of 67 Old 04-15-2014, 12:00 PM Thread Starter
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It is done...


Have to post these final pics.

My 8000 grit Diamond plate came in a week ago, and after several attempts to get this old #8 just right...nope.

Blade is honed as best I could...Cap Iron or Chip Breaker was clogging up...not good.

Was not seating right on the blade..reading several article's on how to correct this, came across a very cool video on importance or what it actually does...


So I honed the Cap Iron and it sits tight on the blade, no chips or debris getting between the cap iron or blade...what a difference

Anyways here is a pic on a makeshift bench, had to retire my custom sharpening station...Dave, still laugh at that comment...

But sad to say the restore is done, it was a-lot of fun.

Must add this, would not like to use this plane for any length of time,
It will give you a workout.
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post #55 of 67 Old 04-15-2014, 12:49 PM
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Nice set of final pictures. Well done.

How can you retire that custom sharpening station after all the time you invested in it.

I did not appreciate the significant contribution of the cap iron until one of my first restorations. The plane skipped all over the test board. Shavings caught between blade and cap iron.

I had see the video so was aware of the importance of the position, but had not appreciated the need to hone the front edge of the cap iron. Now this is part of any restoration.

The Lee Valley replacement cap irons are terrific and can be a very good upgrade for performance.

I can imagine the workout from using a No. 8. Gives a new perspective on the energy the old craftsmen had to expend to get things done.
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post #56 of 67 Old 04-15-2014, 08:02 PM
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Thanks for the update, and the reminder on needing to tune the chip breaker. Glad to see the beast in action, a fitting end to a great thread!

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #57 of 67 Old 04-16-2014, 09:06 AM
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Very nicely done. That is a real nice looking plane.

Interesting video, I usually hone the chip breaker flat to keep the chips from jamming between the blade and the breaker, but had not realized the importance of the angle.

I am certainly no expert on planes, but I am trying to get better at using them. I have an old set of Audel woodworking books, with a copyright of 1949 (same year I was born) that belonged to my Father. In the book, it indicates that the chip breaker should be set back from 1/32 to 1/8 depending on the depth of cut. So I guess they were not too far off.

Paul
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post #58 of 67 Old 04-16-2014, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastback View Post
I have an old set of Audel woodworking books, with a copyright of 1949 (same year I was born) that belonged to my Father. In the book, it indicates that the chip breaker should be set back from 1/32 to 1/8 depending on the depth of cut. So I guess they were not too far off.
The knowledge for setting the cap iron has been around a LONG time.

I have a book called "Planecraft" published in 1934 by the old Record company. Recently republished by Woodcraft. Great book by the way.

There is a section on recommendations of distance of the cap iron from the blade edge

"For rough work cap iron 1/32in to 1/8in from the edge
For finishing work, cap iron 1/64in from the edge
For hard woods with irregular grain - as close as you can get it to the cutting edge"

Knowledge such as this is easily forgotten when the old trades and craftsmen fade into history.
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post #59 of 67 Old 04-16-2014, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
The knowledge for setting the cap iron has been around a LONG time.
Knowledge such as this is easily forgotten when the old trades and craftsmen fade into history.
I have a few years experience with planes, but that was years ago.
Just recently started using and restoring them again.

Do remember my Grandpa cleaning his plane after using it, after putting the blade and cap together, always held it up and looked at it.
Now I know why, I think.
To this day I still wonder how he got his planes so sharp just using a oil stone and a leather strap, no jigs at least as far as I can remember where used.

Thanks for the tip on the book, found a copy on line at a really good price.

I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.
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post #60 of 67 Old 04-25-2014, 09:53 AM Thread Starter
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I have a update on the #8.

In this whole restore or rehab, I did not even do a plane study on it for others.

For those who are new to restoring or cleaning up Stanley planes, here are some useful links
http://home.comcast.net/~rexmill/pla...ing/typing.htm
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html
http://virginiatoolworks.com/tools/s...ey-type-study/

The #8 I have is not going to be 100% period nor is it intended to be.
What was planed was to bring it back to a working tool again.

Which was done with some added improvements with the help of Dave Paine. His design or build of the stronger Tote and knob, just only added to the functionality of this tool.

I do have a new frog coming for it, to replace the brazed one that is on it.

So here it is.
The bed of the plane, to me appears to be a Type 6
The frog is a Type 8
Lever cap, Iron, cap iron looks to be from a type 6

Here are some pics, that may help my theory.
I have seen some raised dot's on lever caps and on other older plane
foundry mark..?
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