Need Longer Thickness Caliper - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 05:15 AM Thread Starter
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Need Longer Thickness Caliper

I love these calipers from Lee Valley but I sometimes need them to be longer. Anyone have a good idea how to make something like them longer? I make flutes and I bore the long hole for the flute sound chamber.Occasionally one will drift a little and if I know this I can allow more wood to be left there when finish turning it...just maybe not turning the flute as thin. Anyhow any ideas would be appreciated . I have the longer set.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/pag...513,43550&ap=1
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post #2 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 07:31 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Not quite sure where you need to measure ....





If you need to measure smaller diameters, unlike these for bowls, then start with a standard internal caliper and extend the legs. If you have MAPP gas propane torch you can braze the extensions on yourself. To measure the internal diameter, use the center caliper:





Otherwise, an internal micrometer like this will measure down into it 6"
https://www.amazon.com/Anytime-Tools...ateway&sr=8-10


Then measure the external diameter and the difference is your thickness at that point.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-13-2019 at 07:56 AM.
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post #3 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 07:33 AM
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Depending on how you are equipped for metal working, the calipers could have some more metal added to it and made bigger. You could use 1/4" steel rods to make the parts and use a torch to re-shape the caliper. Then braze the parts on. You could hire it done but would cost a fortune.
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post #4 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 12:46 PM
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Do you need a caliber for that, the hole may be off centre but will be straight so insert a long dowel or metal rod the same diameter as the hole, now as you rotate it the offset will show up.

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post #5 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 03:17 PM
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I looked at the Lee Valley calipers. It took me a few seconds to understand how they work. If I were making flutes and Lee Valley doesn't make what I need, then I would make a KISS home-brew version:

Get two thin steel rods. Use a grinder to sharpen the ends to a dull point. Bend one tip (short bend) at 90 degrees for inside and another (45 degrees?) for the outside. Drill the ends of two rectangular sticks of wood and glue the steel rods in the holes. Drill near one side of the sticks to leave room for the measuring bolt, which will go through one stick and must avoid the steel rod.

Join the other end of the sticks with a simple hinge, so you can angle the steel rod tips together and apart. It should work like a film maker's clapperboard.

Drill through the top of one stick to allow a threaded measuring bolt. Drill it near the end where the steel rods are inserted for maximum precision. Be sure that the hole will miss the steel rod. Mark through the hole to countersink and glue a washer on the inside of the other stick, opposite the hole. The end of the bolt can touch the washer when the bolt is tightened.

Done.

To use, insert the 90 degree steel rod in the flute hole and close the tool until the ends touch the inside and outside of the hole. Rotate the measuring bolt until it just touches the washer. Remove the tool and close it again to see the actual gap. The bolt will touch the washer and the tips will be the same distance as you measured before.

This is a homebrew version of the far superior Lee Valley tool. The advantage is that you can make the skinny steel rods as long as you need. It may take a little trial and error to find the most suitable steel rods that are strong enough to feel when they touch the walls of the hole, but thin enough to fit. Once done, you can use this tool on many flutes.

One concern is repeatability. The longer the inserted rods, the less precision you will get at the measuring bolt. You may want to make several tools in different lengths to optimize accuracy.
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post #6 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Do you need a caliber for that, the hole may be off centre but will be straight so insert a long dowel or metal rod the same diameter as the hole, now as you rotate it the offset will show up.
When measuring to see how accurate or straight the gundril went I measure the thickness of the walls.If one side is thinner than the other it has drifted. If I happen to miss this I could turn the piece and mess up the flute..It doesnt matter "that" much on some flutes but just if I am making some of the thinner walled ones. Thanks in advance to everyone for the ideas.

Last edited by Mike Turner; 08-13-2019 at 08:07 PM.
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post #7 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Do you need a caliber for that, the hole may be off centre but will be straight so insert a long dowel or metal rod the same diameter as the hole, now as you rotate it the offset will show up.
When measuring to see how accurate or straight the gundril went I measure the thickness of the walls.If one side is thinner than the other it has drifted. If I happen to miss this I could turn the piece and mess up the flute..It doesnt matter "that" much on some flutes but just if I am making some of the thinner walled ones. Thanks in advance to everyone for the ideas.
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post #8 of 8 Old 08-13-2019, 08:06 PM Thread Starter
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Good idea.I can swing that I believe!Thanks!
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