Making my own... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 Old 07-22-2018, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
CreosoteCreations's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Nashville, TN (just east of, anyhow)
Posts: 27
View CreosoteCreations's Photo Album My Photos
Making my own...

A decent mallet. Ventured on this one agreeing with myself to use strictly elbow grease. No power tools. No "plans". Just me, my imagination and the tools. Here's how far I've gotten...

BTW, rip cuts with a big-box Stanley saw are tough in White oak!!

Still working on shaping the handle. I've got rather large hands so I'm really focusing on trying to find something that I feel would be comfortable and won't tire my hand like standard hammers do.

Justin
CreosoteCreations is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 07-22-2018, 10:28 PM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,090
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Justin, I see you have been having fun today. The mallet is coming along pretty good. What finish are you going to use? Yes, we do want follow up pictures.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #3 of 9 Old 07-22-2018, 11:06 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
CreosoteCreations's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Nashville, TN (just east of, anyhow)
Posts: 27
View CreosoteCreations's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks Don.

The last mallet I made was of maple I actually used mineral oil. It looks nice but that oil just doesn't ever seem to set or cure so when it's humid outside or gets damp with palm sweat it feels kind of...dare I say, "icky".

I'm thinking of using a spirit cut Teak Oil this time, mainly because I have some on hand and it may suit the nature of my shop (exposed to the elements) and my uses a little better since it seems to be a harder set cure and a little more water resistant. Oil finishes just feel so nice in the hand to me.

I would try BLO and paste wax but neither are on-hand and the budget is tight this week. Such is the paycheck-to-paycheck life...

What would you use?

Justin
CreosoteCreations is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 Old 07-23-2018, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
CreosoteCreations's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Nashville, TN (just east of, anyhow)
Posts: 27
View CreosoteCreations's Photo Album My Photos
Finished!



Justin
CreosoteCreations is offline  
post #5 of 9 Old 07-23-2018, 10:43 PM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,090
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Justin, that turned out really nice. I was going to show you mine but I better not.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #6 of 9 Old 07-23-2018, 10:46 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
CreosoteCreations's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Nashville, TN (just east of, anyhow)
Posts: 27
View CreosoteCreations's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
Justin, that turned out really nice. I was going to show you mine but I better not.
Thanks! I'm certainly proud of it. Lots of sweat and even a bit of blood went into it. Gotta get used to sharp tools. Haha.

The wife even said "Wow! That's really pretty.".

Justin
CreosoteCreations is offline  
post #7 of 9 Old 07-24-2018, 01:39 AM
Senior Member
 
Brian T.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: McBride, BC
Posts: 2,647
View Brian T.'s Photo Album My Photos
Good. I like that.
Somebody (you) finally made the strike faces at an angle that matches the radius of your swing for a square "hit".
Make another, drill it out and add stacks of pennies in epoxy for added weight with same size.

Handle size:
Many carvers use the "Kestrel Constant" for handle size.
Palm up, fist grip. Your second and third finger tips should just touch the fat ball part of your thumb.

How did you go?

For me, for crooked knives and adzes, the Kestrel Constant means that I have to start with a handle blank of 7/8" x 7/8"
and carve that down a bit skinny. Then a single layer of #18 tarred nylon seine cord gives me the grip.
Brian T. is offline  
post #8 of 9 Old 07-24-2018, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
CreosoteCreations's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Nashville, TN (just east of, anyhow)
Posts: 27
View CreosoteCreations's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
Good. I like that.
Somebody (you) finally made the strike faces at an angle that matches the radius of your swing for a square "hit".
Make another, drill it out and add stacks of pennies in epoxy for added weight with same size.

Handle size:
Many carvers use the "Kestrel Constant" for handle size.
Palm up, fist grip. Your second and third finger tips should just touch the fat ball part of your thumb.

How did you go?

For me, for crooked knives and adzes, the Kestrel Constant means that I have to start with a handle blank of 7/8" x 7/8"
and carve that down a bit skinny. Then a single layer of #18 tarred nylon seine cord gives me the grip.
I'll have to make another and weigh it down like you suggested.

In regards to the handle, I had no idea that there was such an academic approach to it. Where would one find this information?

My approach was simply mocking a pre-existing handle on a hammer that I felt was very comfortable. Quite literally testing the feel as I removed material and sighting down each handle to match the ergonomics as close as possible.

Justin
CreosoteCreations is offline  
post #9 of 9 Old 07-24-2018, 04:26 PM
Senior Member
 
Brian T.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: McBride, BC
Posts: 2,647
View Brian T.'s Photo Album My Photos
The Kestrel Constant. That's what I call it. Kestrel Tool describes it in their instructions but gave it no name.

http://kestreltool.com/index.html

Measure enough home made adze and crooked knife handles in the Pacific Northwest.
You would come to believe that the carver made the diameter to fit their hands.
Too fat or too skinny and you need a death grip to hang onto it to work all day on a pole or bowl, etc.
I learned that 1 1/8" or 3/4" were really the wrong size for my big hands and long fingers.

I buy just the blades and make up all the handles, couple dozen now.

I don't think that it matters too much(?) with a mallet but there is an ideal hand position to hold an elbow adze.
Of course, you can choke up on the head whenever you wish.
It makes a difference if you carve with an elbow adze for as little as an hour.
Strike at your heart rate but the stress on your arm becomes obvious.
I can switch hands at any time which helps ( I'm old now.)
Brian T. is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making a Rebate Plane Paul Montgomery General Woodworking Discussion 4 04-25-2018 03:12 PM
edge joinery for making table tops cassidy General Woodworking Discussion 14 06-08-2017 06:24 PM
Making your own dowels and centers fisher Joinery 3 04-16-2017 06:09 PM
Making Micarta epicfail48 Project Showcase 23 03-19-2016 09:34 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome