Low Angle Knuckle Cap - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 08-29-2013, 12:44 AM Thread Starter
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So, I bought this plane from Cliff (Pirate)

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Condition was described as "nice" but when it arrived I was pleased to find that it was in VERY nice condition.

I received it promptly.

Thanks again Cliff!

I had some time to putz in the shop today so I started tuning up this plane by lapping the sole on 100 grit.

So far so good. There was only minor pitting (red dot) that will not effect performance.


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Then lapped the left side...


Low Angle Knuckle Cap-forumrunner_20130828_213515.jpg

I started on the right side and found this mark...


Low Angle Knuckle Cap-img_20130828_183809.jpg

I have no idea what it indicates. Any your thoughts?

Once sole, and sides are lapped to 220 then 400 grits I'll start on the blade.

I borrowed a honing guide from my neighbor but I want to get my own.

Any recommendations?

I compared this plane to my neighbors block plane and it appears that my plane would be considered a low angle block plane.

What degree of bevel and micro bevel should I hone to?

Your input is always appreciated.

Jeff

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey

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post #2 of 17 Old 08-29-2013, 01:00 AM
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The "BL" designation shows up on the castings of many Sears Craftsman & (lesser line) Dunlap block planes. It has also been found on the lever caps and blades of Sargent planes. (a supplier of planes to Sears).

It most likely designates a "BL"ock plane. The only other explanation I can think of is that it signifies a cosmetically defective plane or a "blemish."

I have more than a few Stanleys in the collection with a factory stamping of "IMPERFECT".
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post #3 of 17 Old 08-29-2013, 07:55 AM
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That's interesting information. I never knew they stamped the imperfects. Very nice looking block plane.
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post #4 of 17 Old 08-29-2013, 08:38 AM
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I've found a few marked "imperfect" as well.

I sharpen mine at 25 degrees.

I'd say that is a Sargent made craftsman.
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post #5 of 17 Old 08-29-2013, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jharris2 View Post

I borrowed a honing guide from my neighbor but I want to get my own.
There are many honing guides on the market.

Inexpensive ones like this. Easy to make your own version of this one. Firemedic has a thread.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...072,43078&ap=1

Or a more expensive, but much better guide. I have both of these, but now only use this one.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...072,43078&ap=1
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post #6 of 17 Old 08-30-2013, 02:36 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Dave,

I have the second LV guide on my wish list and it seems idiot proof (perfect for me!) but at $70.00 it's a no-go for now.

I found this one at Woodworkers supply in my town. Its a little more expensive than the basic LV model but probably less since I won't have to pay shipping.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #7 of 17 Old 09-01-2013, 07:59 PM
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Craftsman Knuckle Block Plane

JHarris:
I have one just like yours hopefully as in the attached picture. Mine has a white jappaning interior but I don't find any BL's anywhere.

David turner
Plymouth, MI.

Nope, can't get pictures to work.
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post #8 of 17 Old 09-01-2013, 10:55 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your response Dave.

Mine has a black jappanned interior.

I still haven't come to any solid conclusion on the best honing angle for the iron.

Some say 25 but I've read that 12.5 is best for a low angle block plane.

Also I've read that a low angle plane is best suited for planing end grain.

I bought this plane as an "apron pocket plane" intending to use it on long grain.

With that purpose in mind would it be best to hone at 25 or should I hone it at 12 for end grain and pick up a "regular angle" block plane for use with long grain?

I'm confused.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #9 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 12:30 AM
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Jeff, I've got a Stanley/Bailey 60 1/2 low angle plane. I use it for everything - end grain, long grain, chamfer edges - whatever needs quickly trimmed without grabbing a bench plane. Low angle block planes can be susceptible to tear out in long grain, but I've not really had that problem. Just keep the mouth closed fairly tight to the blade and you should be OK.

Most standard block planes have a bedding angle of 20 degrees. This means that the iron is held at 20 degrees off horizontal. Low angle block planes have a bedding angle of around 12 degrees. Your plane is a low angle block and is probably bedded at 12 degrees +/-. I've got both type of block planes and the bevel angle of the iron is 25 degrees for both.

I've never heard of sharpening a plane blade at 12 degrees. It could be something you read meant to say bedding angle of 12 degrees and instead mistakenly said a bevel angle of 12 degrees. A bevel angle of 12 degrees would be so delicate you'd probably ruin the edge every time you used it.

Here is a little graphic that I used as a reminder when I first started learning about planes.



"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins

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post #10 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 01:56 AM Thread Starter
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Many thanks Tim,

I think I did have the bedding angle confused with the angle of grind of the iron.

That graphic will come in handy as I learn to restore and use my planes.

They've been mocking me from their shelf (or maybe it's just the voices in my head).

At any rate, it's high time I started the process.

Here's the lineup.
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When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #11 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 01:57 AM Thread Starter
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When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #12 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 02:08 AM
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That's a nice lineup of planes!

Did the Stanley/Baileys all come from the same place? They all look like they have the same red paint - with the exception of the orange paint on the front of the #7.

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #13 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 02:14 AM Thread Starter
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They were included in a batch of all kinds of tools I got from an estate sale.

$200.00 for everything.

Considering all that was included in the price I probably paid $5 to $10 apiece for the planes.

It was probably a once in a lifetime score.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #14 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 02:16 AM Thread Starter
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Help me out Tim,

I'm a newbie at hand planes.

How would I use these planes once restored?

Plane by number if you will....

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #15 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 03:45 AM
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To start you off, the SB#5 and the Shelton #14 are essentially the same plane by different manufacturers. Generally referred to as a jack plane (jack of all trades) it is the one(s) I'd start restoring and using first. It is typically used first when starting with rough cut lumber, primarily to get to the thickness you want and remove some of the high spots.

Next is the #7 or jointer plane. It's primary use is to true an edge or face after the jack.

Finally is the #4 the smoothing plane. It's used last in the sequence to take the really fine shavings and literally smooth the board and remove any marks that the other two have left.

One reason that the #5 (shelton #14) are called jack planes is they can be set up and used as either a smoothing or jointer plane. Since you have both of those, I'd consider setting up one of them as a fore plane which is very useful for quickly removing wood. Here's one thread on fore plane blades http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/w...e-plane-53230/.

I just ground an extra blade I had into a fore plane blade and I love it. Just this afternoon I needed to remove almost a 1/4" thickness from a glued up panel I was working on and it only took me about 15 min. to remove all that material and then smooth it.

Here's a couple of links with some useful info. The first is tons of information on Stanley Bailey planes their designs and uses. It's very helpful and has detailed descriptions of each plane they've ever made.

The second is a link to an article that firemedic wrote for his site discussing the use of bench planes from his and a historical (Joseph Moxon's) perspective.

If you really want to get started trying out the planes, don't worry so much about a full restoration right away. Take the SB #5 flatten the sole, sharpen the blade and make sure the chip breaker is polished a little and makes good contact with the blade - then start making shavings :)

One final tip - when you get ready to start making shavings, don't start out on hardwood, get a pine 2x4 to practice on. It's a lot easier and more forgiving while you're figuring out depth of cut and other settings.

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #16 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 06:19 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you Tim. I appreciate the time you spent on that post.

I'll finish up the restoration on the knuckle cap and continue my journey into hand planes as you suggest getting the SB #5 into working order.

The tote on the #4 is beyond repair however so I'll try to find a pattern to make my own.

Meanwhile, a full restoration on the Shelton #14 was started previously.

Its fully disassembled, a crack in the front knob has been repaired and the tote has been sanded.



I'm following the steps described here for this restoration.

http://www.majorpanic.com/handplane_restor1.htm

You've given me alot of information and links to more.

I appreciate it very much

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey

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post #17 of 17 Old 09-02-2013, 06:20 AM Thread Starter
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When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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