Identifying wooden body hand plane - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 02-21-2016, 09:01 PM Thread Starter
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Identifying wooden body hand plane

This old plane was left to me by my father. There are no names, letters or other identifying marks, but I'm just curious what kind of plane it is, or rather its intended use.

Thanks, now I'll post and hope the pictures are attached,

John
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post #2 of 16 Old 02-22-2016, 07:13 AM
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it was intended as a smoother.
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post #3 of 16 Old 02-22-2016, 08:35 AM
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It's known as a "transitional" plane. Planes were making a transition from all wood to having metal parts. Wood moves and that could effect wooden planes. There were also no fine adjustments other than the users tap of a hammer. Transitional planes tried to address these problems. These planes only met minimal levels of success. They are very similar to later all metal planes in their sizes and uses. Like the Stanley's, different sizes but the same configuration. The plane you pictured would be the equivalent of a #4 smoother.
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post #4 of 16 Old 02-22-2016, 10:34 AM
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Looks like a 6-1/2" block plane. What does it measure from toe to heel?
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post #5 of 16 Old 02-22-2016, 10:43 AM
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... or if it is larger (about 8") it could be a No.3 smoothing jack plane. What is the width of the iron?
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post #6 of 16 Old 02-23-2016, 09:26 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
It's known as a "transitional" plane. Planes were making a transition from all wood ... plane you pictured would be the equivalent of a #4 smoother.
Thanks. Do you have any idea of the age, or the time period this transition was taking place. You see, I have no idea if this was my father's or his father's, or maybe someone else's.

John
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post #7 of 16 Old 02-23-2016, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Jig_saw View Post
... or if it is larger (about 8") it could be a No.3 smoothing jack plane. What is the width of the iron?
I'll take some measurements tomorrow and get back to you.

Thanks,

John
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post #8 of 16 Old 02-23-2016, 09:29 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by timetestedtools View Post
it was intended as a smoother.

OK, I intend to sharpen it and give it a try.

Thanks,

John
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post #9 of 16 Old 02-24-2016, 03:10 AM
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I'll take some measurements tomorrow and get back to you.

Thanks,

John
Had you laid the tape open in the original picture we could have seen its size:smile3:
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post #10 of 16 Old 02-24-2016, 01:31 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Jig_saw View Post
Had you laid the tape open in the original picture we could have seen its size:smile3:
The tape was only to prop the plane up for the picture, so I didn't have to get down on my old knees to take it. However...in hindsight, it shows the plane is bigger than a tape measure, but smaller than workbench. The size of the tape measure, though, leaves it open to conjecture.

The sole is 8" long, the iron is 2" wide.

Thanks,

John
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post #11 of 16 Old 02-24-2016, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodciro View Post
The tape was only to prop the plane up for the picture, so I didn't have to get down on my old knees to take it. However...in hindsight, it shows the plane is bigger than a tape measure, but smaller than workbench. The size of the tape measure, though, leaves it open to conjecture.

The sole is 8" long, the iron is 2" wide.

Thanks,

John
This is a No.3 smoothing plane meant for single-handed use for touching up small trouble spots. The blade should be about 1-3/4" wide.
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post #12 of 16 Old 02-24-2016, 04:40 PM Thread Starter
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This is a No.3 smoothing plane meant for single-handed use for touching up small trouble spots. The blade should be about 1-3/4" wide.
The blade is exactly 2" wide. I guess this varied with different makers. I wish I knew the approximate age and manufacturer, and thought someone might recognize it. Probably too many manufacturers years ago. Could have been one that's gone and completely forgotten.

Thanks for you help, at least I know its intent now,

John
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post #13 of 16 Old 02-24-2016, 05:57 PM
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Thanks. Do you have any idea of the age, or the time period this transition was taking place. You see, I have no idea if this was my father's or his father's, or maybe someone else's.

John
This is a link to Patrick's Blood and Gore page. http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan4.htm
This refers to Stanley brand planes but others would have been similar. Transitionals were made from 1870-1943, depending on type. Woodworkers pick up tools as they find them, hard to know who, when or where without some provenance. It will be enjoyable to use regardless.
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post #14 of 16 Old 02-24-2016, 09:15 PM Thread Starter
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This is a link to Patrick's Blood and Gore page. http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan4.htm
This refers to Stanley brand planes but others would have been similar. Transitionals were made from 1870-1943, depending on type. Woodworkers pick up tools as they find them, hard to know who, when or where without some provenance. It will be enjoyable to use regardless.
This is what I was looking for. Thanks, Hammer. After reading and looking at examples at this link, I now believe it to be a Stanley.

It appears to be almost identical to the very first picture on Patrick's webpage.

Thanks again,

John
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post #15 of 16 Old 02-27-2016, 11:25 AM
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Given your dimensions, it appear to be a pre-1922, Stanley #24 smoothing plane. If you scroll down Leach's Superior Works page, you'll find it. As far as value, transitional planes are not in as much demand as Stanley's cast planes. eBay currently has a few #24s listed from $35 to $50. Here's one example in exceptional condition (the sole is almost perfect) - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bailey-Stanl...cAAOSwWTRW0OrQ
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post #16 of 16 Old 02-27-2016, 09:23 PM Thread Starter
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Given your dimensions, it appear to be a pre-1922, Stanley #24 smoothing plane. If you scroll down Leach's Superior Works page, you'll find it. As far as value, transitional planes are not in as much demand as Stanley's cast planes. eBay currently has a few #24s listed from $35 to $50. Here's one example in exceptional condition (the sole is almost perfect) - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bailey-Stanl...cAAOSwWTRW0OrQ
I read on down later and saw that. I believe you're right. Post 1922's were 9". At that price, I believe I'll keep mine.

Thanks,

John
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