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post #1 of 14 Old 02-02-2015, 10:49 PM Thread Starter
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Hand Planes

Crazy question. Probably simple for allot of people. I know of three styles of planes. Block plane (small), Jr. jack plane (medium), and jack plane (large). This is what I was taught in Jr. high school, so these are basic terms and probably not right or very vague. I own a block plane and a Jr. jack. What is the real difference between the Jr. and the jack? Is the Jack needed? Thanks

Eric
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post #2 of 14 Old 02-02-2015, 10:58 PM
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A little light reading and a basic overview:
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/arti...5995-2,00.html
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post #3 of 14 Old 02-03-2015, 12:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anguspapa View Post
Crazy question. Probably simple for allot of people. I know of three styles of planes. Block plane (small), Jr. jack plane (medium), and jack plane (large). This is what I was taught in Jr. high school, so these are basic terms and probably not right or very vague. I own a block plane and a Jr. jack. What is the real difference between the Jr. and the jack? Is the Jack needed? Thanks

Eric
No what you have is adequate. Learn how to keep them sharp and you'll be just fine.

Jack
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post #4 of 14 Old 02-03-2015, 12:30 PM
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Hand Planes

A Jr jack is just a jack plane with a more narrow sole & cutting iron.

Block planes are good for general work - chamfers, localized smoothing of small areas, stuff like that.

A jack plane is so named as it alludes to the "jack of all trades". It's best suited for initial flattening of rough stock, though it can be used for edge jointing of smaller pieces and will work as a smoother in a pinch with the right setup.

A smooth plane (no 2, 3, 4, 4 1/2) is meant for final smoothing after the stock is planed flat.

A jointer plane (no 7 or 8) is used in flattening board faces and jointing edges to be straight and square.

To really be set up completely, you'd need a smoother, jack, and a jointer. And a low angle block plane is good to have too ;-)

Last edited by BZawat; 02-03-2015 at 01:18 PM.
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post #5 of 14 Old 02-04-2015, 08:10 PM Thread Starter
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This is the plane, that I have, it is what I call a junior Jack. It is a craftsman plane, stamp in big bold letters made in the USA. It was my grandfathers and he would be about 96 years old right not! :) When people talk about the number of the plane, 4 5 6 etc. what is this or is it any thing like that?



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Thanks as always

Eric
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post #6 of 14 Old 02-04-2015, 08:38 PM
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That looks about the same size as a Stanley No 4, which is a smooth plane. A Jr Jack (Stanley no 5 1/4) has a longer sole.
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post #7 of 14 Old 02-04-2015, 08:49 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BZawat
That looks about the same size as a Stanley No 4, which is a smooth plane. A Jr Jack (Stanley no 5 1/4) has a longer sole.
It measures 9" - 9 3/4". The farthest point back is rounded and that's for the 9 3/4 comes in the play. Greatly appreciate your input. If I buy another planer its going to be a rabbit plane. I just use them for touch up work and if I cannot run it through my portable planer, before sanding. I also own a block plane.

I 'm always using milled lumber for semi milled lumber (what I mean by semi milled lumber is 3 of 4 sides have been ran through a planer, top, bottom, left, & right). Am I using the correct terms.

Thanks BZawat, you have always been very helpful and polite thank you.
Eric

Last edited by Anguspapa; 02-04-2015 at 09:12 PM.
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post #8 of 14 Old 02-05-2015, 10:46 PM
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Yeah that's definitely a smoother you've got there. Probably well suited for your purposes, since you're working with already milled stock.

Generally speaking, I do 90% of my stock milling by machine (with a mechanical jointer and planer). I don't have a lot of time to spend on my own projects, so I prefer to spend that time cutting joints & building instead of planing lumber all day. That said, the smooth plane is definitely the plane that I use the most.

I really dislike sanding so I use either my Stanley no 4 1/2 smoother or no 112 scraper plane (depending on the grain) to remove all the milling marks and prepare for finishing.

A rabbet plane would be a great tool to pick up. I have a metal Stanley and a couple old wooden ones that I use in cutting joints & making mouldings.
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post #9 of 14 Old 02-11-2015, 06:16 AM
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Hello,
From the pictures it looks to be very well taken care of.
Craftsman where made by several major makers, Sargent and Miller Falls
are the most notable. The plane you have is priceless, as it was handed down to you..
Sargent plane's and Miller Falls, to me are just as good as the Stanley of the same era.

A little history on both company's;
http://oldtoolheaven.com/bench/bench.htm
http://www.sargent-planes.com/sargen...s-value-guide/

The Phillips knob screw would place it around the early 1950, and on up. If the tote and knob are of the plastic kind that would confirm it.

Best thing to remember, keep your iron sharp..along with cap iron honed..
Some good tips here..
http://virginiatoolworks.com/2012/06...-a-hand-plane/

Happy shaving...

I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.
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post #10 of 14 Old 02-11-2015, 09:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acowboy
Hello, From the pictures it looks to be very well taken care of. Craftsman where made by several major makers, Sargent and Miller Falls are the most notable. The plane you have is priceless, as it was handed down to you.. Sargent plane's and Miller Falls, to me are just as good as the Stanley of the same era. A little history on both company's; http://oldtoolheaven.com/bench/bench.htm http://www.sargent-planes.com/sargen...s-value-guide/ The Phillips knob screw would place it around the early 1950, and on up. If the tote and knob are of the plastic kind that would confirm it. Best thing to remember, keep your iron sharp..along with cap iron honed.. Some good tips here.. http://virginiatoolworks.com/2012/06...-a-hand-plane/ Happy shaving...
Thank you, Acowboy. That planer was my grandfathers, World War II vet. It was then given to my uncle been given to me. Definitely old book. :). I'm probably going to end up going buying a new one. And put that one aside.

I'm not sure what you were referring to as the knobs. I don't know my planner parts. :( I am right-handed so my left hand is on the knob in the front that appears to be plastic, my right hand would be on a large handle in the back that appears to be plastic.

Eric

Last edited by Anguspapa; 02-11-2015 at 09:42 AM.
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post #11 of 14 Old 02-11-2015, 09:40 AM Thread Starter
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After listening to other people's suggestions I'll probably end up buying a #4 Stanley

Last edited by Anguspapa; 02-11-2015 at 09:45 AM.
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post #12 of 14 Old 02-11-2015, 10:01 PM
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A Stanley #4 is a good choice, don't count out a Miller Falls or a Sargent either. A couple others where very well made hand planes where Union and Ohio. I even like a #3 in some cases too.

Parts are easier to find on the older Stanley though.

Develop your skills in sharpening the blade, there is quite a few videos and articles about how to do it, along with what you need to get started.

A good sharp hand plane or even a block plane is a pleasure to use, also very addicting....

Here is another good link.
http://home.comcast.net/~rexmill/pla...e/refinish.htm

I don't have any "part planes" I keep restoring them.

Last edited by acowboy; 02-11-2015 at 10:03 PM. Reason: Forgot a good link
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post #13 of 14 Old 03-08-2015, 08:33 PM
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I just bought a Ohio tool co #26 in good condition. How much are they worth?
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post #14 of 14 Old 04-16-2015, 08:57 PM
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Hand planes

I wouldn't put a valuable plane aside because you think it might be valuable, "use it" that's what it was made for and you won't wear it out in your lifetime (or your grandchildren's lifetime). If you want a new hand plane consider a Jointer plane 22 -24" long that will allow you to flatten a table top or cabinet side or just straighten out a large board. I bought some value planes 35 years ago they were Record Planes with corregated bottoms to reduce friction when cutting but today I would buy Lie Neilsen or Veritas for their superior quality. If you don't want to spend that much money there are a lot of used planes out there.

Jack
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