gloves for the shop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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gloves for the shop

most of my hobby involves real hard woods - oak, maple, etc.

I plane for thickness, I rip for straight, etc.

with the result that I seem to attract a lot of bleeding cuts from sharp edges on the various pcs. using fingers to guide 'feets of stock' through the router, TS, etc. almost always produces 'blood on the boards' - and worse, cuts/slices make for tender fingers and that can lead to disasters when the stabbing pain causes one to flinch....

I have been leery of gloves because there is the snag&drag factor - dragging fingers into a moving cutting blade is really not recommended . . . . plus the general loss of tactile feedback and control.

any experiences on using gloves in the shop? particular brands that offer a snug fit + good friction finger-to-work piece?

just bought a box of 100 bandaids for the shop,,,, so it's not a must fix today issue.....
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post #2 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 12:55 PM
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How about a butchers glove. Used by them in cutting meat. Should be readily available from Amazon. Would be in most cooking sundry stores.
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post #3 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 01:04 PM
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The butcher's gloves are cut proof but not puncture proof. You can still stick a knife point or splinter through the mesh. Sold restaurant supplies for several years. I have one and it has that info on the label.
I don't wear gloves in the shop and rarely for anything else.

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post #4 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 01:39 PM
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I still remember my high school shop teacher telling us "Gloves have no place around machinery in a wood shop; they give a false sense of security. Push blocks and push sticks keep your fingers way from the dangers of blades."

Safety glasses were mandatory and strictly enforced too...I wish I was better about following that protocol, I usually remember right about the time I get something in my eye.

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post #5 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 03:25 PM
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I do not understand the problem. I use hard woods and have none of the problems you describe. I take a blood thinner so bleeding can be a problem for me.

I would ABSOLUTELY NOT use gloves when feeding wood into machinery.

I use gloves when handling wood.

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post #6 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 04:49 PM
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Ditto what George said; I use gloves when hauling lumber from the sawmill to the truck and the truck to the shop. But I never use them when I'm woodworking in the shop - never. I work with Walnut, Maple, Beech, Cherry, Rosewoods, and other very hard exotics and all create sharp edges off the jointer, table saw, drum sander, planer, etc. and I rarely cut myself. I play guitar so I'm very careful but not shy about handling the sharp wood.

My $0.02 is don't use gloves.

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post #7 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 04:55 PM
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Practice better finger placement and build some calluses, glove have no place around tools. If you need convincing, look into accident photos of people who've had their fingers degloved because they forgot to remove a wedding ring, or those who've had their hand sucked into the spinning stock on a lathe because a glove caught.

It only takes seeing a human arm turned into a piece of spaghetti once, after that you will never even think about gloves, loose sleeves or jewellery. Keeping your fingers away from sharp edges is much safer, and easy to learn
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post #8 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 05:10 PM
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If I'm going to be passing a bunch of work past a tool where I MUST use my fingers, I will wrap a flexible fabric band aid around the ones that are going to be pressing on the work piece. However, push blocks, push sticks, and feather boards are the preferable practice.

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post #9 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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well, pretty much confirms what I've always held dear about gloves around machines . . .

the advice to simply develop better callouses is splendid. totally impractical, but splendid.
I'm in awe of folks who can manage their cutting/etc to avoid sharp edges. perhaps if I use duller blades/tools I may get there as well.

I have made / make / modify / tweak many hold-down/slide by sticks, pegs, doohickies, etc to avoid having to slide fingers over wood wood pieces - most I find ungainly to unworkable to outright dangerous. in theory I do not disagree - it you can mechanically block/brace/guide it, that's better than fingering it . . . . but, sigh, sometimes that's just not workable. the Rockler Thin Rip doodad is my personal favorite where it applies well. did some test re-saw with the bandsaw using that guide, veddy smooth and issue free...

Jim's "put on a bandaid and go do it" approach is my fave at this point....
like . . . if it works after, why would it not work 'in advance' - pretty much some stick'ems first with no blood later....
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post #10 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 05:32 PM
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I agree with everything everybody said, no gloves but I too have thin skin and it cuts pretty easy, tough getting old but I have also found out to keep my hands moisturized dry skin cuts/cracks easier than softer skin
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post #11 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
well, pretty much confirms what I've always held dear about gloves around machines . . .

the advice to simply develop better callouses is splendid. totally impractical, but splendid.
I'm in awe of folks who can manage their cutting/etc to avoid sharp edges. perhaps if I use duller blades/tools I may get there as well.
You started the thread asking for advice, advice was given, and you didn't like what folks posted.

I hope the "duller blades/tools" was an attempt at sarcasm on your part; dull blades and tools are extremely dangerous because it causes way to much force by your hands, arms, body to push the material and make those "dull" blades work. Those same "dull" blades/tools won't be slowed down cutting through flesh and bone; I can promise you that.

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post #12 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 06:06 PM Thread Starter
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of course it's on the sarcastic side. same as the "I do all that and never produce a sharp edge" contributions.
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post #13 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 09:24 PM
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Calluses work better for me.
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post #14 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catpower View Post
I agree with everything everybody said, no gloves but I too have thin skin and it cuts pretty easy, tough getting old but I have also found out to keep my hands moisturized dry skin cuts/cracks easier than softer skin
Yep, keep your hands moisturized (I'm a bleeder too) and you will definitely have fewer cuts.

Hand placement helps too. (I get sharp edges but have learned to keep my hands moisturized (especially in winter) and to keep they away from the edges (OK, most of the time) but I still keep the band aid supply stocked up.)
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post #15 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 10:50 AM
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Plywood edges are pretty good at cutting you up. Regular wood isn't so bad. Avoid gloves. The band-aid idea is pretty good.
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post #16 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 02:04 PM Thread Starter
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... plywood

well, see - this where things go their separate ways. because. . .
I work with plywood for tops / shelves / etc. right regular.
I'm always putting some kind of banding / edging on it.
the plywood is rough cut over size, then carefully cut to finish size.

it's handled like a pane of glass - simply to avoid bashing up the edges and making a mess of the band/plywood joint.

and it's the blinkity -blankity banding cutting / cutting / routing where I get sliced and diced.
I don't _want_ a nice sanded smooth corner on that join - I _want_ it sharp and crisp.

and lemme say, white oak and maple is real good at holding an edge - red oak isn't far behind.
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post #17 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 02:33 PM
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With the lone exception of running power tools, I wear cloth lined thin leather work gloves in my carving shop all the time.
It's cold, vibration, hand grime, slivers, skinny tools, all kinds of considerations, safety might be #10.
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post #18 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 03:36 PM
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post #19 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 04:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
well, pretty much confirms what I've always held dear about gloves around machines . . .

the advice to simply develop better callouses is splendid. totally impractical, but splendid.
I'm in awe of folks who can manage their cutting/etc to avoid sharp edges. perhaps if I use duller blades/tools I may get there as well.

I have made / make / modify / tweak many hold-down/slide by sticks, pegs, doohickies, etc to avoid having to slide fingers over wood wood pieces - most I find ungainly to unworkable to outright dangerous. in theory I do not disagree - it you can mechanically block/brace/guide it, that's better than fingering it . . . . but, sigh, sometimes that's just not workable. the Rockler Thin Rip doodad is my personal favorite where it applies well. did some test re-saw with the bandsaw using that guide, veddy smooth and issue free...

Jim's "put on a bandaid and go do it" approach is my fave at this point....
like . . . if it works after, why would it not work 'in advance' - pretty much some stick'ems first with no blood later....
Eh, it doesn't take much awe inspiring talent to teach yourself better hand placement, it's just a matter of making sure that you don't run your finger down a sharp corner. There's nothing magical about it, it's just a matter of realizing that a sharp corner on wood will cut you just as well as a spinning blade, and keeping the same mindset when dealing with both, I.e making sure you don't place your hands in a way that would cause injury

You're more than welcome to swing by my shop and and see how dull my tools are (spoiler alert: they aren't). You're also more than welcome to see how I avoid having sharp edges on fresh cuts (spoiler alert: I don't). And yet, no cuts on my admittedly delicate hands

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post #20 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 02:58 AM
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I sometimes scratch myself on something but I have really cut down on cutting myself since I decided to round over edges on boards with my hand plane. Just one swipe will do it and everything will still be square.

Measure 6 times, cut 3. Plane it down wrong and go buy a second board.
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