Flattening wood slabs with router - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 22Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 38 Old 01-13-2019, 06:19 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Outonalimb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 2
View Outonalimb's Photo Album My Photos
Flattening wood slabs with router

I'm pretty new to woodworking. For work I fall trees but when snow comes I have alot of down time so I am trying out some live edge pieces. Being inexperienced, I have been doing things the hardest way possible.....🙄 but found some videos on flattening slabs with a router. Can anyone tell me if a plunge router is a must or can you use a regular trim router? I have only seen it done with a plunge but is it possible with out?
Outonalimb is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 38 Old 01-13-2019, 07:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,956
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Welcome aboard. The problem with a trim router is going to be power. You could make it work, but you will have to use a smaller bit because of the less power in a trim router. Therefore taking longer to do the job.


You could make your jig so that the router starts off the side surface of the slab. That way you would not need the plunge function.


George
gmercer_48083 likes this.
GeorgeC is offline  
post #3 of 38 Old 01-13-2019, 07:37 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,207
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
What he said ^

Invest in a plunge router at least 2.25 HP. A larger router than that will be heavy as a hand held, but very good for under the table mounting. Just one router is never enough, I know, I have about 10 of them. Trim routers are great, but not for this where you might spin a 2" diameter bit. Smaller than that will take forever and increase the amount of sanding afterward. You Tube is full of videos on Planing with a router sled.


This one needs a flat bench:



This one uses a frame on the floor:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-13-2019 at 10:21 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 38 Old 01-13-2019, 08:16 PM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 2,381
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
Outonalimb...WELCOME!!! You'll find here there's 2 sides....then some in between, LOL!!! I'm on both sides of traditional AND power tool BUT most are hard one sided....IF you truely like wood it DOESN'T matter the side JUST ENJOY!!!!

First your question....NO you DON'T have to have a plunge router....they just make it sweeter BUT you do need HORSEPOWER and sharp cutters!!!

For the traditional...knowledge AND SHARPNESS then it's easy....ask Jay Whitecloud.

Keep us posted as we LOVE pics of wood!!!
35015 likes this.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #5 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 12:27 AM
Former Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,512
View 35015's Photo Album My Photos
Hello...and Welcome!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Outonalimb View Post
I'm pretty new to woodworking. For work I fall trees but when snow comes I have alot of down time so I am trying out some live edge pieces. Being inexperienced, I have been doing things the hardest way possible.....&#x1f644; but found some videos on flattening slabs with a router. Can anyone tell me if a plunge router is a must or can you use a regular trim router? I have only seen it done with a plunge but is it possible with out?
Hello Outonalimb,

I think you have already gotten some darn good leads for dealing with your challenge...(Thanks Tim for your kind woods...Blessing to you Brother!)

I noted you "fall trees"...???...Is this as a Forester or Arborist? I've worked in both fields and was the Tree Warden of my town for several years. Sounds like trees and wood are a big part of your life. Good for you!!!

As stated you don't have to have a plunge router, as any will do, but larger is better and a sharp bit is a must...Small routers are for small wood, and larger is a must for really big slabs...

I would be out of character (this will make most here either laugh at me or cringe...LOL) if I didn't suggest doing it traditionally just to get to know the wood and the traditional modalities. Yes, its takes some "elbow grease" to do it this way, but not as difficult as many think. I here folks all the time talk about how "hard it is to do," yet...when I ask how many they have done from beginning to end with only traditional methods and tools..the answer is always the same...NONE!!!

Now don't misunderstand my suggestion, it is work, but I can state it is the best way to..."learn wood"...and the art of woodworking. If you take a good and sharp scrub plane, you can work a big slab down in just a few hours if you are even in remotely good shape. I still work down large slabs (3' to 4' wide and up to 12' long) with just hand tools alone just to keep in shape and in practice for such tasks.

Now, the other method that combines power and hand work is to not use a router, but a small (or larger as our is over 12" wide) hand power planer. Then you just finish with the scrub plan, a smoothing plane then a jack plane. This isn't as much work yet the same intimate knowledge of the piece of wood and what it has to tell you about itself...

Good luck and would love to see pictures of your work!!!

j
35015 is offline  
post #6 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 05:34 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,207
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
You can use power and hand tools ...

I made a large door from planks glued together, much like a bench top using a combination of handheld power planer, bent sander and hand planes here:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/d...1-4-ply-55717/
No router used on that project.


The hand held power planer has a learning curve, but once you master it, the task of removing thin layers of wood and leveling an uneven surface is manageable. Same goes for the belt sander, especially with an aggressive grit belt. You can easily make some gouges and divots if you not constantly moving it about. The hand planes are definitely more controllable.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #7 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 02:20 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Outonalimb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 2
View Outonalimb's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for all the help! My next question is plunge router or fixed base? Dont really understand the difference lol. I'm excited to try this method. When I say I have done things the hardest way possible I mean leveling a slab by sanding......and sanding........and sanding. A month later....I finally had it but wasnt completely happy with the results. I then bought a 22 tooth angle grinding craving disc, which was alot better then palm sander. Lol
Jay C to answer your question, Arborist. I mainly do residential trimming, falling, pruning all that fun stuff. Where I am from, all of the tree services use boom trucks. I am one of two that actually climb instead which has its advantages. There are alot of places you are unable to take a boom. I run a pretty small business, just me and I hire a couple crew members to help me on the ground.
Outonalimb is offline  
post #8 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 05:55 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 133
View phaelax's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
plunge router or fixed base? Dont really understand the difference lol
It's pretty much as it sounds. A fixed base doesn't really let you change the depth of your router bit, which is fine if you're using a router table. The plunge router let's you "plunge" the bit down at your own control. You can adjust a stop so you only go so deep. It's helpful when routing areas out in the middle of work pieces. I'm still fairly new with using routers myself but that's pretty much the basics. I have a plunge router myself I got on CL for $50, gets the job done for me.

You might want to invest in a hand planar, even a cheap one will probably save you time versus trying to sand something flat.
phaelax is offline  
post #9 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 06:25 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,207
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
V 2.0 plunge vs fixed base

Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
It's pretty much as it sounds. A fixed base doesn't really let you change the depth of your router bit, which is fine if you're using a router table. The plunge router let's you "plunge" the bit down at your own control. You can adjust a stop so you only go so deep. It's helpful when routing areas out in the middle of work pieces. I'm still fairly new with using routers myself but that's pretty much the basics. I have a plunge router myself I got on CL for $50, gets the job done for me.

You might want to invest in a hand planar, even a cheap one will probably save you time versus trying to sand something flat.

Not really!
To adjust the height of the bit in a "fixed" base router when it's mounted under the table, first stand on your head upside down, then you must release the motor lock, rotate the motor in it's threaded housing and hope you moved it the right direction and the right amount... This is why a router lift is so beneficial. It makes the height adjustment in small increments from above the table, at least it does so on all three of MY router tables.


A plunge router mounted under the table has return springs that when the lock is released force the motor and bit down below the table. It is almost impossible to set the bit height properly when the motor is spring loaded down. Plunge routers are NOT typically found in router tables for this reason. However, they are great for hand held operations like dados, grooves mortises etc. at least that's what I use mine for.


A combination kit is the best answer for a home shop. This kit includes both a fixed base and a plunge base which are easily attached or removed to the motor. There is also a "D" base, a type of fixed base which has the ON/OFF switch in one of the handles, a great convenience and safety feature. I love mine.

https://www.thespruce.com/best-wood-...values-3536802

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #10 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 08:44 PM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 2,381
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
Stop it!!!!

Ya'll make it sound a fixed base isn't applicable to this project, that it's almost impossible etc., etc. It AIN'T that way.

Phalaex....you only change the depth AFTER a FULL complete pass is done AND it's just 2 turns to loosen the squeeze set by hand and no more than 1/8" drop or 1/4 turn /spin on most routers hieght adjustment. AFTER ALL the time you just spent sleding that's a drop in the bucket...pun intended!!!

Woodnthings....it AIN'T upside down and complex as you make it sound. IF YOU can't do it in 7 seconds flat in the position it will be used YOU NEED to quit woodworking!!!!! Outonalimb if is a absolutely noobie can do it in 10 if she/he knows where the adjustments are AND after 10 passes/adjustings can do it in less than 7. IT'S NOT HARD OR IMPOSSIBLE!!!

Outonalimb, I apologize for me EVEN having to post this in front of a person only asking for good simple advice. The plunge is a nicer option BUT NOT necessary. I'm 35 years into the trades including furniture, custom trims and projects...I do MANY spectacular builds with a 2 hp 30 year old fixed base....yes I've came close to purchasing a plunge and probably will when I purchase a additional router.

I use this story with many people (I've dabbled in photography also)
.....I have a NICE camera AND MANY awh and drool over it and tell me they wish they had one that nice so they can take the great pics also.....I stop and advise them quickly, the ONLY thing I have above there cheaper camera is quality glass BUT that doesn't make great pictures....it's knowing how to use what you have (they don't know I can only operate about 4 functions on this digital pro...on/off..manual settings...flash...iso....SSssshhhHHH I got them fooled!!!!). I tell them I can do just as good with theirs...
Moral of this story....Bells and whistles don't make the train go, it's knowing how to use the working parts to make it move!!!!

Get us some pics...we LOVE wood!!!!
firehawkmph, FrankC, 35015 and 1 others like this.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.

Last edited by Tennessee Tim; 01-14-2019 at 08:48 PM.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #11 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 09:07 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,207
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
C'mon Tim ...

I NEVER said a fixed base was NOT suitable for this project. You mis-read my post. It was a reply to the one above that suggested a fixed base was good for under the table mounting.

I said "not really" because changing the height of the bit requires reaching under the table etc ,, etc.., Read the entire post please before you call me out.
Ya know for a guy with only one router and no plunge routers you better have a good reason to admonish someone, me, who has about 10 of them in all sorts of configurations including 3 table mounted.. Can you tell I'm pissed ....?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-14-2019 at 09:23 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #12 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 09:22 PM
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 243
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
I was working on a slab using a fixed base router. Made router sled from advice I got on here. I use blocks and plywood to raise and lower sled, eh it works for what I do. Bigger router I could use a large diameter tool and that would be quicker. Giving slab time to season out before finishing. Sure makes a lot of wood chips. Fixed base Hitachi router.Name:  20180717_181149.jpeg
Views: 491
Size:  99.4 KBName:  20180722_120353.jpeg
Views: 465
Size:  84.7 KB
Tennessee Tim and 35015 like this.
Roybrew is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Roybrew For This Useful Post:
35015 (01-15-2019), Tennessee Tim (01-15-2019)
post #13 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 09:23 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: NE
Posts: 231
View Larry42's Photo Album My Photos
I think the router sled and a decent router is your best bet. A Bosch 1617 is an OK router. It claims 2.25hp, perhaps, but router HPs are notoriously optimistic. I'm not a fan of electronic variable speed controls because they are far more likely to fail than a simple switch. Their only use would be for swinging large diameter bits where tip speed becomes excessive. There are uses for plunge routers but certainly not required for use on a sled. How big of a bit? Depends, a smaller bit can take a deeper cut all else =. A 1.5" diameter carbide tipped seems like a reasonable compromise for a 2.25HP router. Adjusting your depth of cut for successive passes will take less than 30 seconds. Be careful! Routers will want to pull you into the cut at the beginning, always two hands!!!!

It's worth noting that a router will be shearing the fibers and going "against" the grain 1/2 the time. So you still need to do a considerable amount of sanding or hand planning &/or hand scraping.

We process live edge slabs for several furniture makers. For them it is a matter of time is money. They could do it with a sled, cheaper if they don't count their time. We use a 12hp CNC router swinging a 4" cutter. Then put the slabs through our widebelt sander. A straight line rip saw or CNC beam saw is used to prepare slabs for edge to edge joining.
Tennessee Tim likes this.
Larry42 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Larry42 For This Useful Post:
Tennessee Tim (01-15-2019)
post #14 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 09:36 PM
Former Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,512
View 35015's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Outonalimb View Post
... I then bought a 22 tooth angle grinding craving disc, which was alot better then palm sander. Lol...Jay C to answer your question, Arborist. I mainly do residential trimming, falling, pruning all that fun stuff. Where I am from, all of the tree services use boom trucks. I am one of two that actually climb instead which has its advantages. There are alot of places you are unable to take a boom. I run a pretty small business, just me and I hire a couple crew members to help me on the ground.
Wow...Arborist and Climber/Rigger too...and its your own company...Good for you!!! I worked with a Forester/Botanist that also climbed. She and her husband became two of my all time favorite rock climbing partners. Its great to see Women coming into the field more!!!

I will presume you are getting some of your own trees you drop milled up into slabs? You really should do a post about your work and what you do, and the slabs you have. I'm sure many here would love to see what you do, and your work thus far...

I can't believe you actually "sanded" a slab down!!! That takes a great deal of patients...to say the least. It might have been hard, but you can at least say you did it, and not many could!!!

If you are going to go with an all power approach for flattening these slabs, and don't own a router yet, I would suggest going to a good tool supply store in your area and trying a few of them out. Hold them, see how they feel in your hand. Get them to let you feel them running, and note the gyroscopic force they produce, and what that feels like too. Then (no matter what...other than maybe a screaming sale of some kind) wait a day or two to think about it and perhaps compare some more even...Then purchase the one you want...

j
Tennessee Tim likes this.
35015 is offline  
post #15 of 38 Old 01-14-2019, 11:32 PM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 2,381
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
.....

Ya know for a guy with only one router and no plunge routers you better have a good reason to admonish someone, me, who has about 10 of them in all sorts of configurations including 3 table mounted.. Can you tell I'm pissed ....?
So !!!!

All I said is it doesn't take all these configuration (bells and whistles) AND 10 plunge routers to do her job.....get UNpissed...?

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #16 of 38 Old 01-15-2019, 02:54 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,207
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
The best way to start out .....

Get a router kit with both a fixed base and a plunge base, so you'll have both capabilities.


The fixed base will be fine for planing slabs and other hand held operations where you can adjust the bit height/depth by rotating the motor in the housing. It's NOT the best for under the table mounting because adjusting the bit height is awkward and difficult to reach. However, some newer fixed base routers have an adjustment screw in the base which allows bit height adjustment from above the table, a great feature.
https://www.finewoodworking.com/media/RouterTables.pdf



The plunge base is for held held operations like stopped grooves, or mortises where you are entering the surface incrementally at increasing depths. It is not the best for under the table mounting because you have to overcome the spring pressure each time you release the lock to adjust the bit height, which is tedious. However, some newer plunge base routers have an adjustment screw in the base which makes bit height adjustment from above the table, a great feature.
https://www.portercable.com/products...adjuster/895pk


Or you can modify your plunge router to make above the table height adjustments like this:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #17 of 38 Old 01-15-2019, 09:44 AM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 2,381
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roybrew View Post
I was working on a slab using a fixed base router. Made router sled from advice I got on here. I use blocks and plywood to raise and lower sled, eh it works for what I do. Bigger router I could use a large diameter tool and that would be quicker. Giving slab time to season out before finishing. Sure makes a lot of wood chips. Fixed base Hitachi router.Attachment 370549Attachment 370551
Roybrew, This is what I'd call "spot on" AND thinking "out of the box"!!!! I admire that you took simple things to achieve a specific higher goal without fancy expensive options.....yes there's a few things to change for stability BUT you achieved the project. The pics are worth a thousand words!!!!

DON'T anyone take my posts as misleading.....I DO have GOOD tools AND I have advanced knowledge and have built creative jigs for repetitive work BUT I try to teach at a basic and minimum/limited tool knowledge. People create this high standard hard to accomplish bar that requires expensive tools and shops when the TRUTH is learning/knowledge of the wood/product and BASIC procedures......I have/ had elaborate setups of my own and access to them now BUT as a most of my business is mobile I have to stay basic and minimum as I do ALL the trades and a minimum toolage for each as a whole fills a 28' enclosed shop/trailer.

Roybrew...THANKS again!!!
35015 and Onefreetexan like this.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #18 of 38 Old 01-15-2019, 09:55 AM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 2,381
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry42 View Post
I think the router sled and a decent router is your best bet. A Bosch 1617 is an OK router. It claims 2.25hp, perhaps, but router HPs are notoriously optimistic. I'm not a fan of electronic variable speed controls because they are far more likely to fail than a simple switch. Their only use would be for swinging large diameter bits where tip speed becomes excessive. There are uses for plunge routers but certainly not required for use on a sled. How big of a bit? Depends, a smaller bit can take a deeper cut all else =. A 1.5" diameter carbide tipped seems like a reasonable compromise for a 2.25HP router. Adjusting your depth of cut for successive passes will take less than 30 seconds. Be careful! Routers will want to pull you into the cut at the beginning, always two hands!!!!

It's worth noting that a router will be shearing the fibers and going "against" the grain 1/2 the time. So you still need to do a considerable amount of sanding or hand planning &/or hand scraping.

We process live edge slabs for several furniture makers. For them it is a matter of time is money. They could do it with a sled, cheaper if they don't count their time. We use a 12hp CNC router swinging a 4" cutter. Then put the slabs through our widebelt sander. A straight line rip saw or CNC beam saw is used to prepare slabs for edge to edge joining.
Larry...SWEET CNC setup AND you're right they don't count their time as a expense. Your info on the tearout is important also...I enjoyed reading this post as you DIDN'T condemn the basic way to do the OP's request BUT also explained what you can achieve by spending more money/ or letting a company do the one/few project(s) with a higher precision tool(s)/shop for the ones whom want to stay as a smaller basic shop or not invest into expensive equipment.

Thanks again!!!
35015 and Onefreetexan like this.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #19 of 38 Old 01-16-2019, 12:48 AM
Former Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,512
View 35015's Photo Album My Photos
Something that was given to me today (metaphorically) from a very old (98 years) woodworker as he admired a timber frame we worked on: "...The beauty of less being more..."

Whether going with power, hand or a combination there of, the simpler a setup is kept, and the more you can learn to do with it, typically the more skill you build, be it Woodworker, Blacksmith, Potter, or other tangible craft...

For me, I see too many today relying on (and getting wrapped up in) the tooling and not the out come of what they have "tooled up" for in the first place. As this mindset takes over, from jigs to machine complexity, the more this becomes the focus. In the end, I see (and have seen) many spend more time setting things up to do a given task and would have no way (or knowledge) to carry out that task without all the technology...All the while, many have (i.e. historical) and still do the same work almost as fast (sometimes faster) with nothing but the simplest of tools...and...I would suggest with more satisfaction also, but I own my bias on that one...
Tool Agnostic likes this.
35015 is offline  
post #20 of 38 Old 01-16-2019, 03:41 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,207
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
"fixed base" is a misnomer ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
It's pretty much as it sounds. A fixed base doesn't really let you change the depth of your router bit, which is fine if you're using a router table. The plunge router let's you "plunge" the bit down at your own control. You can adjust a stop so you only go so deep. It's helpful when routing areas out in the middle of work pieces. I'm still fairly new with using routers myself but that's pretty much the basics. I have a plunge router myself I got on CL for $50, gets the job done for me.

You might want to invest in a hand planar, even a cheap one will probably save you time versus trying to sand something flat.

You don't have this right. The fixed base router is adjustable for bit height typically by loosening a lock which is on the outside of the motor housing, rotating the motor within the housing and relocking it... aka.... Porter Cable 690's and others. The confusion comes from the word "fixed", it's just misleading. A router whose depth of cut is not adjustable would be very difficult to work with.



The plunge base routers are more true to the description in that the bit is normally held above the work surface by springs in compression. Then when you want to begin routing, a groove for instance, you release a lock, lower the bit under spring pressure and lock it at the desired "depth". There is typically a 3 step post to set the bit at 3 different depths and it's adjustable.



Because I have 3 router tables with lifts for various setups, I am very aware how difficult is is to adjust the height of the bit above the table without a lift OR a router without that feature built into the base.



Often the dust collection is built around the router itself to contain it. This makes it nearly impossible to reach under the table to change the bit height in either type of router without a lift. If that's the case, you must then lift the heavy router and mounting plate out of the table, adjust the bit height, measure it and place the plate back into it's recess.... a PITA.



https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/evil-machine-28461/



On this project, I used both a 3.25 HP Porter Cable and a 3.5 HP Milwaukee fixed base router to make rabbets along both edges of about 1000 lineal ft of rough sawn Cypress for some large barn doors I made. Each board was 14 ft long, so using a hand held router was the best way for me:







Attached Images

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newbie wood questions bholland General Woodworking Discussion 10 10-29-2018 05:06 PM
Talk me out of buying a router zyglrox Power Tools & Machinery 27 10-14-2018 07:53 PM
How to join large wood slabs for counter tops Cajunquick Joinery 10 10-27-2017 06:35 AM
Unusual ambrosia fungus blue fir slabs are molding Catherina Willard General Woodworking Discussion 1 06-20-2016 05:49 PM
Wood Slabs JDMeek2020 Classifieds 3 08-09-2015 02:33 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome