First hand plane - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 04-11-2012, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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First hand plane

Hello everyone,

I'm looking to "get into" woodworking and am trying to build up a collection of tools. Searching for a first hand plane has been a little intimidating. It was recommended to me that I buy an older Stanley low angle block plane, and I've been looking on eBay for one. I'm just curious whether there is anything I should be looking out for or avoiding in my search on eBay. (Again, I am totally new at this so I would appreciate simplistic answers if possible).

Would something like this be a good first purchase...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-OLD-...item3cc48ef6f4

or...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/160778274800...84.m1438.l2648

Thanks for any advice!

Last edited by jdamin; 04-11-2012 at 03:35 PM.
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post #2 of 9 Old 04-11-2012, 03:22 PM
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I don't like the crack right behind the mouth. I'd keep looking.
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post #3 of 9 Old 04-11-2012, 04:36 PM
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The second one doesn't look too bad but for a few dollars more you can buy a brand new one. The new ones will take some tuning but they are pretty well made compared to some of the junk that's out there. Vintage is usually the way to go however unless you get into the Lie Nielsen and Veritas level of planes.

What kind of budget do you have? Planes can range from a few dollars to a few thousand dollars depending on what you buy - this goes for new and used planes. A low-angle block is a good starting point as is a Stanley #5 or its equivalents.

If you are looking used some of the non-Stanley brands are good buys. I personally really like Millers Falls. I've bought several that cost more to ship than I paid for the plane. Ohio Tools, Keen Kutter, Sargent and Record all made good planes and quite a few were simply second run Stanleys or had slight defects that they didn't brand with Stanley. If you really want to dig into it and research - Patrick's Blood and Gore is a phenomenal site when it comes to Stanley planes. Old Tool Heaven has a good section on Millers Falls planes.

Last edited by cellophane; 04-11-2012 at 04:38 PM.
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post #4 of 9 Old 04-11-2012, 10:40 PM
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You should get a 60 1/2, 4, 5, & 7.. and perhaps the low angle jack plane from lee valley for shooting. Well that's what I am doing anyways. I already have the #4 and #5. I think the low angle jack will be next since I'll be doing tons of shooting, since I do everything by hand. I am really looking forward to the #7 for jointing.

If you haven't already, you should get into scraping. It's inexpensive, saves money on sandpaper and smooths to a gloss.

Last edited by woodgeekess; 04-11-2012 at 10:46 PM.
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post #5 of 9 Old 04-12-2012, 07:03 AM
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A small block plane is an excellent starting point. Those you linked to are the right type IMO....now you just need to find the right deal on one in good shape. Expanding your search to include Record or Millers Falls planes will give you better selection.
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post #6 of 9 Old 04-12-2012, 10:13 AM
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I initially refrained from posting a reply to you because it's not going to be a quick one.

The second plane looks fine. I wouldn't have any qualms about buying it if it's stays under $10. If it complete it's far better than a "new" one. It sounds like you've already decided that's the plane you want to start with but I have to add a lil more.

The real question here is utility. I got by with one a 5C for a LONG time. Granted I wasn't the hand tooler I am now in those days. What plane you need first depends on what type of work you'll do. If you will be mainly power tooling through cabinets then a block plane may be the only plane you need for now. If you'll be building furniture with hand tools then it changes. I do just about everything by hand these days and for furniture I couldn't do without a #5, a #7/#8, and a 78 rabbit plane. Of course there are plenty other hand tools I couldn't do without but we're talking about planes.

So have you figured out what type of work you'll do? What type of materials you'll use? What your budget constraints are...?

There simply are NO straight answers for questions with SO many unknown variables.
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post #7 of 9 Old 04-22-2012, 08:53 PM
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post #8 of 9 Old 04-22-2012, 09:54 PM
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I do just about everything by hand these days and for furniture I couldn't do without a #5, a #7/#8, and a 78 rabbit plane. Of course there are plenty other hand tools I couldn't do without but we're talking about planes.
.[/QUOTE]. Tom, you didn't mention your 45. Do you really put your 78 above your 45? My 78 frusterates me to no end.
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post #9 of 9 Old 04-22-2012, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACP
I do just about everything by hand these days and for furniture I couldn't do without a #5, a #7/#8, and a 78 rabbit plane. Of course there are plenty other hand tools I couldn't do without but we're talking about planes.
.
. Tom, you didn't mention your 45. Do you really put your 78 above your 45? My 78 frusterates me to no end.[/QUOTE]

Yes, I consider my 45 a 'luxury' and my 78 a necessity.

The 45 does a few cool things but in all honesty it's behind a stack of wooden moulding
planes as well...
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