Face Marks? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 6Likes
  • 1 Post By FrankC
  • 1 Post By gmercer_48083
  • 1 Post By amckenzie4
  • 3 Post By Maylar
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 14 Old 06-08-2018, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
AmishElectricCo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Ohio
Posts: 332
View AmishElectricCo's Photo Album My Photos
Question Face Marks?

I'm interested in learning more about using marks like those shown in the image below. I've found a couple articles here and here, but hoping maybe some of you have found a source with more information.

Am I over-analyzing this? Guessing there's no formalized system, just use whatever works?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	MM-Maching.jpg
Views:	340
Size:	29.4 KB
ID:	362610  


⚡ Anthony
AmishElectricCo is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 Old 06-08-2018, 11:26 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I don't see any reason to put marks on the wood. Just something more to have to sand off. Normally I run the wood S2S first so that takes care of the face side. If the board is bowed and has enough thickness I might flatten it on a jointer before surfacing it. Then I joint one edge straight and rip the wood about 1/8" wider than I need and dress both edges on the jointer taking off 1/16" off each side. Then cut the parts to a finished length.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #3 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 12:11 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Maybe over analyzing. Mark where needed and when needed, but no set marking rules needed.
Depending on the type of work, I use a pencil 90% of the time. I use a Sharpie for the other 10%.
Some use a marking gauge, a knife blade or a scratch awl. Itís a matter of preference and my preference is the pencil.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 11:56 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,652
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Do what is necessary and will not cause more work for you, much of this depends on how much memory and concentration you still have, as we get older we need sometimes need more reminders.
Pencils are good for reference, particularly soft leads that don't indent the wood, I only like to use a scratch tool if I am going to cut that mark deeper. Markers tend to act like a stain and soak into the wood, so have the same problems as a scratch tool with the added factor of bleeding.
I also have a roll of painters tape handy to write notes to myself.
AmishElectricCo likes this.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
post #5 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 12:07 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Vernon, BC
Posts: 457
View bargoon's Photo Album My Photos
I seldom mark the boards - only sometimes when using the jointer and usually when using the dovetail jig.

I always use chalk so I don't scratch the surface of the wood.

THE GOOD NEWS: You create your own destiny...THE BAD NEWS: You create your own destiny
bargoon is offline  
post #6 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 01:48 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Troy Michigan USA
Posts: 1,188
View gmercer_48083's Photo Album My Photos
Mr Amish, When you surface mark as indicated in your photo, you are telling yourself that the face side is flat (usually indicated with a cursive f...sometimes looks like a ribbon). Then after you have done that it allows you to joint at 90 degrees to that face, then mark it. By marking as you go you can keep track of which faces are square with which face. By marking the x on the end will let you know it is not finished yet (squared, planed or whatever). Marking your parts as you make them is a good practice (habit) because you can come back hours, days or weeks later and quickly determine what you've done. This works especially good in hand work, where you might end up re planeing the wrong side or edge not realizing that it was already done. Another tip is to pre decide which direction the grain is rising so that after gluing several boards together the grain rises in the same direction and you can hand plane in the right direction for less tear out.
AmishElectricCo likes this.

Last edited by gmercer_48083; 06-09-2018 at 02:01 PM.
gmercer_48083 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to gmercer_48083 For This Useful Post:
AmishElectricCo (06-09-2018)
post #7 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
AmishElectricCo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Ohio
Posts: 332
View AmishElectricCo's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you, @gmercer_48083, that's exactly what I was looking for.

I'm a (mostly) hand tool beginner and follower of Paul Sellers. You always hear him talk about these things...I think he uses the term "reference face"...to make one side flat and the next face perfectly square to it. The camera doesn't really show what kind of marks he's making.

Given that Paul is British, I wasn't sure if this system was formalized with an American version, or if it was just something he did on his own. I was inclined to believe the latter because there's surprisingly little information on the interwebs about this topic.

⚡ Anthony
AmishElectricCo is offline  
post #8 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 04:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,335
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
To mark or not mark is a personal decision. How to mark is also personal. Use whatever marking code you will remember.


Georg
GeorgeC is online now  
post #9 of 14 Old 06-09-2018, 09:24 PM
Be Nice
 
JohnTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 279
View JohnTC's Photo Album My Photos
I put marks all over the place. Might stop when I get more experienced. Usually use math symbols because I'm familiar with them, but whatever works for you sounds like a good way to do it. If you work in a shop with others, something more standardized would be better.
JohnTC is offline  
post #10 of 14 Old 06-10-2018, 09:28 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Troy Michigan USA
Posts: 1,188
View gmercer_48083's Photo Album My Photos
Anthony, Sorry about calling you Amish, I didn't notice your name...Duh!

How you mark your wood is up to you, as long as it makes sense to you.

Paul Sellers way of teaching the ins and outs of hand tool woodworking is by far the best I have found on the internet. I have viewed most all of his videos, and I have learned something from every one. The one thing he has drummed into me is the importance of sharpening. I bought a 100x microscope for my camera/phone just to see up close and personal how each stage of sharpening and honing effects my chisels and plane irons. I now regularly plane the end grain with my #4 bailey plane. I love the silence that comes with hand work...and find myself actually thinking while I am working. I have also read his books (Working Wood 1&2, and Essential Woodworking Hand Tools) and learned great tips from each page. I also read Hand Tools by Aldren Watson based on his recommendation which is also a fantastic book to learn from. I can't say enough praise about Paul Sellers way of teaching.

Last edited by gmercer_48083; 06-10-2018 at 09:54 AM.
gmercer_48083 is offline  
post #11 of 14 Old 06-10-2018, 09:31 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,688
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Where do you get chalk for marking? Do they make chalk pencils or something not so fat? Do chalk marks last a long time?
Tool Agnostic is offline  
post #12 of 14 Old 06-10-2018, 10:01 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Troy Michigan USA
Posts: 1,188
View gmercer_48083's Photo Album My Photos
I used colored sidewalk chalk once to color code the parts for assembly when making a bunk bed. I found it difficult to remove those colors from pine, and never did it again.
gmercer_48083 is offline  
post #13 of 14 Old 06-11-2018, 03:45 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Near Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 1,530
View amckenzie4's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Maybe over analyzing. Mark where needed and when needed, but no set marking rules needed.
Depending on the type of work, I use a pencil 90% of the time. I use a Sharpie for the other 10%.
Some use a marking gauge, a knife blade or a scratch awl. Itís a matter of preference and my preference is the pencil.
I'm a fan of standardized markings, because then I don't have to spend time trying to figure out what I meant that mark to mean when I made it three weeks ago.

Starting to make those marks regularly also greatly reduced the amount of time I spent cutting grooves in the wrong edge of a board.
gmercer_48083 likes this.
amckenzie4 is offline  
post #14 of 14 Old 06-11-2018, 04:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Maylar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Central Connecticut
Posts: 1,151
View Maylar's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmishElectricCompany View Post
I'm interested in learning more about using marks like those shown in the image below. I've found a couple articles, but hoping maybe some of you have found a source with more information.

Am I over-analyzing this? Guessing there's no formalized system, just use whatever works?
The face marks you've shown are classic cabinetmaker's marks. I've used them ever since I started making furniture where being straight and square matters. I think I learned it from one of James Krenov's books. One piece of advice is to never mark in anticipation, but only after the face and edge have actually been jointed and squared.

Doesn't need to be a fat mark - a light pencil line that can be erased easily works for me.

Dave in CT, USA
Maylar is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trying to figure out what's causing sanding marks BrosephMansby General Woodworking Discussion 9 12-13-2018 06:50 AM
Concealing Irregularity: Face Frame Stile Wider than Cabinet? Lovegasoline Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 7 06-13-2018 05:50 PM
1/2" Overlay Hinges for Thicker Face Frame Curmudgeon10 Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 5 04-09-2018 02:55 PM
What material for a shop cabinet face frame? subroc General Woodworking Discussion 2 06-06-2016 05:25 PM
Sanding Marks chilla Wood Finishing 2 04-19-2016 11:02 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome