Creating wood strips - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 08:34 AM Thread Starter
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Creating wood strips

Hi,
I am looking to create long (approx 1'-2') thin wood strips for a project. The thickness needs to allow the wood to be pliable to bend easily. Width approximately 3 inches (i can trim if wider). I recently purchased a Japanese hand plane but not sure if that is only good on really soft woods. I would like to use this on all sorts of wood. Any suggestions on hand tools or power tools? Please reference the picture for an idea. Thanks
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post #2 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 09:03 AM
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My first thought is to use a table saw and simply rip the strips to the thickness needed. Most table saws will rip up to 3" thick stock. Use a good quality ripping blade and a good push stick. My saw can rip (resaw) up to 3 9/16" thick stock and I've cut strips as thin as 1/64" thick. My second choice would be a bandsaw with a tall resaw fence and a good resaw (3 tpi) blade mounted. Then you can use your new plane to smooth the cut surfaces.
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post #3 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 09:33 AM
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I agree with Jim Frye. As long as the strips are less than 3 inches wide, use the table saw. With a good sharp blade and a carefully aligned table saw, very little cleanup or hand planing should be necessary.

There are gadgets that help make thin rip cuts. I bought one of the Rockler thin strip jigs soon after I bought my table saw. I saw it in the store and it seemed like a cool gadget, so I bought it. Since then, I have also seen various versions of it as make-your-own projects:

https://www.rockler.com/thin-rip-tablesaw-jig

It is a "one trick pony" jig, but it may be just the thing you need.
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post #4 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 09:42 AM Thread Starter
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Wow that's a great tool! Definitely need to look into that. Greatly appreciate y'alls help! If you have any suggestions on excellent tablesaw blades you recommend as well. Hopefully not very expensive... The craftsman general purpose blade I have on there now could use an update...
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post #5 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 01:51 PM
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I use a 24T Freud thin kerf Glue Rip blade for ripping on my table saw. I paid $35 for it at a woodworking show many, many years ago.

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post #6 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 02:18 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Table saw...?

By anyone's standards a 3" or 3 1/2" rip is maximum for a 10" table saw. That doesn't mean it's a good idea. A lot of us would make that cut in two passes, one half way through, the other at full height. That's a whole lot of sawdust to carry away in the gullets, so a 40 or 30 tooth blade is in order IF you use the table saw. If the dust can't get carried away, the blade will heat up and bind in the kerf.
Also, you had better have the cut offs fall on the left side of the blade! If they are between the fence and blade on the right side they will surely kickback or get ruined. BTDT. A full 3" cut may tax your motor to the point it will stall out. It's been a while since I used one with a 1 HP motor, but I don't think it would make it at a full height of 3".

My procedure would be to use a bandsaw and jointer in combination and this is what I've done to make cuts up to 8" or greater. For 3" wide strips a small 6" jointer would be perfect. You first surface one side on the jointer, followed by the resaw cut on the bandsaw. This leaves only one side that needs to be planed or sanded, your choice. The next step is the joint the the cut face and smooth it out. Now you make the next cut using the same fence offset. .. So it's joint, then saw..joint then saw... etc.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-05-2018 at 04:25 PM.
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post #7 of 12 Old 11-05-2018, 03:19 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys! Great information
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post #8 of 12 Old 04-02-2019, 04:39 PM
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After putting a 1" 3tpi resaw blade on the Grizzly Bandsaw it is my 1st choice now for ripping most anything. Much safer, less waste and really easy and fast. I ripped a 1/2" 4x8 sheet of plywood on this saw and compared to the tablesaw it's a major improvement. No having said that I have used a table saw for years and got it done with that. Yet the difference between the choice of the 2 will be Bandsaw for ripping...17" or less!

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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
By anyone's standards a 3" or 3 1/2" rip is maximum for a 10" table saw. That doesn't mean it's a good idea. A lot of us would make that cut in two passes, one half way through, the other at full height. That's a whole lot of sawdust to carry away in the gullets, so a 40 or 30 tooth blade is in order IF you use the table saw. If the dust can't get carried away, the blade will heat up and bind in the kerf.
Also, you had better have the cut offs fall on the left side of the blade! If they are between the fence and blade on the right side they will surely kickback or get ruined. BTDT. A full 3" cut may tax your motor to the point it will stall out. It's been a while since I used one with a 1 HP motor, but I don't think it would make it at a full height of 3".

My procedure would be to use a bandsaw and jointer in combination and this is what I've done to make cuts up to 8" or greater. For 3" wide strips a small 6" jointer would be perfect. You first surface one side on the jointer, followed by the resaw cut on the bandsaw. This leaves only one side that needs to be planed or sanded, your choice. The next step is the joint the the cut face and smooth it out. Now you make the next cut using the same fence offset. .. So it's joint, then saw..joint then saw... etc.
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post #9 of 12 Old 04-02-2019, 07:25 PM
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How thin/pliable? A glue line rip blade on a table saw might be able to do it. But they suck a lot of power.
A bandsaw used like woodenthings said works if you have a way to clean up the bandsawn side.
At a production level there are other ways but likely beyond what you have available.
You can buy veneer @ about 1/32" or less.
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post #10 of 12 Old 04-03-2019, 03:45 AM
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I'm late to this party. You have gotten lots of great suggestions. Here are some clarifications that may help:

1. Rockler Thin Rip jig:
I have one of those Rockler thin rip jigs. I like it and use it on occasion. It anchors in a miter slot. On a few saws, it does not extend far enough to touch the blade. The two saws that I know about with that issue are both jobsite saws. On those two saws (maybe others!), you cannot rip the thinnest strips because of the gap between the fully extended thin rip jig and the blade. I am away on business travel, so I can't check my saw, but I would say that the gap is 1/2 inch or so. IMPORTANT: The problem occurs with the thin rip jig on the LEFT side of the blade and the rip fence on the RIGHT, as you would normally expect to make the cut.

The thin rip jig will also work in the RIGHT miter slot with the fence to the LEFT of the blade. On my saw, I could use it that way to get the thinnest strips. It works, but it may increase the risk of injury, because everything is backwards and you are not used to operating the saw in this way.

2. Kerf size:
Even if you use a thin kerf table saw blade, you will lose a lot of wood to sawdust from the thickness of the blade itself. For every strip you make, you will waste two or three strips worth of sawdust. The advantage is that with a newly sharpened blade, you can get very clean cuts.

If you use a bandsaw, you won't waste much wood, but it will take more work to clean up the cuts.
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post #11 of 12 Old 04-03-2019, 05:13 AM
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Instead of the Rockler jig, I just clamp a piece of scrap on my miter gauge as a stop block to set how far over I push the stock before locking the fence for the cut. But, I am "thrifty."

I haven't tried real thin cuts, but I have had good luck with rips of thicker boards by cutting ~60% through then flipping the board to finish the cut.
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post #12 of 12 Old 04-03-2019, 11:14 AM
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Heres a vid of a jig for cutting thin strips. Might work for you or at least help you head in the right direction. like a few others said 3" cuts are alot so stay safe.

P.S. The Diablo blades cut great and arent to bad on the pocket.


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