Any shaving horse owners out there? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 54 Old 05-28-2010, 09:59 PM
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I have one that I made in the early 90's (1990's, guys). I used the basic design from Roy Underhill's book. Started with a tulip poplar log about 5 or 6 feet long and a foot in diameter. Look for straight grain! Split the planks and had most of the prep work done in one afternoon. I used a poplar sapling for the legs to save some time and work.

Made mine with 3 legs for stability on uneven ground. Even have a holdfast on the back to hold pieces for boring and such.

Got to be my favorite tool. Disassembles easily since it's held together with red oak pegs and the legs just go into tapered holes. I take it to elementary schools for demonstrations.
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post #22 of 54 Old 06-15-2010, 07:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firefighteremt153 View Post
This may be a dumb question, but what do you use a shave horse for?
I'm with you... I still don't know....
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post #23 of 54 Old 06-16-2010, 09:25 AM
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A shaving horse (or schnitzelbank - shaving bench) is a foot operated vise to hold wood while you work with a draw knife or spoke shave. You can do a lot with one and I keep finding new uses. There are two basic designs - English and German. The English style has two arms holding the head while the German has the dumbkopf on a single arm through the center.

Which you choose is a matter of taste - of which there is no disputing! The English has a limit on the width of the work you can hold _ the separation of the arms, while the German has the arm in the middle and you have to work around it.

Each woodworker has to make theirs to fit (Ergonomics with a vengeance!). The critical dimensions are taken when seated: Sole of the foot to the knee; Knee to the hip; bottom to the elbow and elbow to the hands. It makes sense when you see someone working on one.

Mine can have the legs pulled and the thing leaned against the wall, so it only takes up floor space when it is in use. If you are doing traditional woodworking you can't do without one. Coopers, wheelwrights, woodwrights and even turners use them to round off billets before putting them on the lathe.
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post #24 of 54 Old 07-01-2010, 12:46 PM
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I built one several years ago, when I was trying to get into traditional archery and bow making. But mine is just simple pine, 4 legs, and I find myself using it more and more for varied projects. It's nice not to have to loosen clamps to turn a project 1/4 turn, and it actually only has a loose pivot point that keeps the dumb head from falling all the way down, and instead uses the bottom edge of the slot for where the pressure is primarily focused.

My supply list:
1 - 2"x10", 8 foot length (This is the seat and the ramp)
2 - 2x4, 8 foot length (the dumb head, post, and foot ramp)
1 - 3/4" dowel, 1 foot length (You really only need about 6" of it, if your slot is tight around the dead head post)
1 - 2" Round Pine Handrail, 8 foot length (These were the legs, and worked great)

Most of the build was simply eyeballed, or carved from a comfort standpoint. If I had it to do again, the only thing I would change is to make it right handed instead of ambidextrous. I very very rarely use the left side of mine, and I should have made the right leg notch a little deeper and the foot pedal more for the right leg. Ah well, I'll use that if I build another
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post #25 of 54 Old 07-01-2010, 01:04 PM
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Thank mr.Fanback The sawhorse is what I'm looking for
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post #26 of 54 Old 07-03-2010, 10:58 AM
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BuckeyeHughes, Did you suspect there were this many responsive shaving horse riders out here? There are two basic styles. The English bodger with two shafts holding the head and the German style with a single shaft in the center. Each has it's own advantages and disadvantages. Depends on what you are doing and are used to!

Check out the Roy Underhill books. You'll get all you'll need to make a shaving horse, plus a lot more.

The horse must fit the worker, not the other way around. Fit the leg length, knee to pedal, riser height and ramp angle to suit your body and style. If nobody else is comfortable, so what!

Put the legs in tapered holes so they can be pulled. Makes storage better and easier transportation!

My horse has three legs. Makes it more stable on uneven ground! Didn't plan it that way, the main plank twisted a bit, so I encountered, adapted and overcame!

Made mine to the German style, from a tulip poplar log about 1-foot in diameter and about 5 - 6 feet long. The planks were riven with wedges and gluts (wooden wedges). Far easier than sawing! Just requires a straight-grained log which tulip poplar tends to be. Split off two planks about 3 to 4 inches thick.- one is the main and the other becomes the riser and ramp. The remainder is das dumkopf (Yes, dumb head! It, not you!) and legs. Decide how big the head is to be, saw in from each side to where the shaft is to be, take a deep breath and split the waste off! Shave the legs to suite and fit them to the tapered holes. Get some red or white oak and rive pegs to hold the ramp and riser and for a pivot for the dumkopf. All this is much easier if you have a shaving horse, of course!

Then get to shaving!
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post #27 of 54 Old 07-04-2010, 10:19 AM
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Way too go folks! I use mine for many things from extra seat in the shop to bowl and spoon carving ,wooden rake and hay fork making,roughing in wood for the spring pole lathe to just plane ole stick butchering! ( LOL !). My bench area of the horse ,well I didn't make it large enough to allow for the use of Doweling plates or Hold fast's, but they have their own bench for that. My Grandson really enjoy's flailing away with his little wooden mallet helping out his Pap-paw with the making of pegs.
Out towards the end of the "Riser"(?) I've installed two pegs to help keep the stahl's or rake handle's from swinging out at times and keep from "whacking" some one close by in the Knee caps!. Even though I'm keeping constant pressure on the treadle board I felt as though this was a nessessary safety addition for the viewing public.
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post #28 of 54 Old 07-05-2010, 01:06 AM
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A very neat solution. Proper Job! OK to file off the serial numbers and use the idea?
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post #29 of 54 Old 07-06-2010, 12:22 PM
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"Yes Sir!" Help Yourself, It's not all that intrusive(?) and easily removable but it sure helps save the day when the public is in close watching.
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post #30 of 54 Old 07-07-2010, 05:14 AM
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I am a bit embarrassed to say I purchased mine as well... got a deal at 3 Rivers Archery... it was a "demo" model. I purchased it back in '04. Made me many a nice bow, back when Yew was $100 a stave.

The true test of any wood worker worth their salt is the ability to convert Millimeters into Inches in ones head. Now someone will need to market a converting calculator called Your Head....
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post #31 of 54 Old 07-08-2011, 01:07 PM
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If a feller always wanted a shaving horse, why doesn't he build one? I have thought about it for a few years, just ordered plans for one pictured on 1st page of postings, and will build it slowly. I plan on slight modification on the adjustable platform. The notches could break as shown. I'm going to use three thicknesses of materials - center verticle grain and two ourside - glued on - horizonal grain. This will significantly strengthen the notches and almost guarantee that none will break.

Later
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post #32 of 54 Old 07-08-2011, 01:22 PM
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cajunotexas

I am going to purchase a draw knife to use with the shaving horse I plan to build. Debarking cedar and oak limbs for making primitive chairs with be the use of the draw knife. What size draw knife should I purchase for the intended purpose?

Later
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post #33 of 54 Old 07-08-2011, 01:57 PM
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It seems a good shave horse ought to at least have a mirror on it and the real ones won't hardly hold still long enough for a decent shave.
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post #34 of 54 Old 07-08-2011, 04:11 PM
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It's been years since using a shaving horse, still have the drawknives, though. The horse is so much better than a bench vise.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #35 of 54 Old 07-08-2011, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glh17 View Post
It seems a good shave horse ought to at least have a mirror on it and the real ones won't hardly hold still long enough for a decent shave.


Harrison, at your service!
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post #36 of 54 Old 05-07-2012, 04:40 PM
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reclaimed shave horse

im new here & came here because im building a shaving horse.mine will be made from reclaimed lumber.the bench is a verry old piece of oak i found 5'x3.5''x14''.the legs will be 4x4 pine.many designs on the web feature old english style & german styles,the old american colonial style is what im after,just looks more heavy duty.
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post #37 of 54 Old 05-08-2012, 12:01 PM
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Shaving Horse and New wood table vice

Hi All,

It has been a while since I have communicated on this site. I have now a neat Shaving Mule, similar to the one which was pictured. I did not want to chance building one from the picture - which I usually do. I ordered the plans and made some minor improvements. I build mine out of 1" oak instead of 2" pine. I glued the front portion of the stretcher on to a 1x4 oak. I made a convex curve instead of a concave one. The knotched riser I made of mesquite for contrast. I used an old tractor seat which is adjustable instead of the foam one.

Also I have upgraded my shop table with the latest in vice technology. Len Hovarter has invented a vice which differs significantly from the vices of the last 600 years. All prior vices have had screws for the take-up. Len's vice has two 1" rods (round stock) which do not require oiling. Watch his video it will blow your mind. Also Len and I have been communicating about slight improvements. If you phone him he will share the improvements with you. Mention Shelby the Texas Man.

If anyone is interested in his vice you can see them on www.hovartercustomvice.com . His invention is awesome!!!
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post #38 of 54 Old 05-08-2012, 10:43 PM
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What are you going to do with your shaving horse? I could not get that link to work.
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post #39 of 54 Old 05-09-2012, 12:20 AM
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post #40 of 54 Old 08-25-2012, 04:49 AM
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Newbie here. Almost no woodworking experience but I love wood and working with my hands.

I was given a good sized eastern red cedar today, about thirty foot tall and fifteen inches in diameter. It was killed by a wildfire last summer but is still upright. The bark burned away and the remaining wood is spotted with charred areas less than one eighth inch deep.

I'm planning to use about five foot of the trunk for the big pieces of two shaving horses (one for myself and one for the friend that is giving me the tree) and most of the limbs/branches for walking staffs and atlatls as well as the smaller pieces of the shaving horses.

Any chance I could get a decent split with wedges or should I look for a way to get it sawed into planks?
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