Advice on Hand Planes - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By BigJim
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 7 Old 12-16-2017, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
Novice Member
 
woodeneye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Bethany, MO
Posts: 4
View woodeneye's Photo Album My Photos
Advice on Hand Planes

I have a new Stanley 12-404 No. 4 Adjustable Bench Plane with 2-Inch Cutter. The economy model. If I put enough effort into it, can this plane perform how it should without upgrades? I just want to know before I undertake the project. If you were new to the hand planing world and wanted about 3 economical planes to start with, which 3 would it be? I really want to fill out my set. I'm mainly talking if I buy them new. I mainly want them for furniture construction (like coffee tables) and other assorted wood working projects.

Any input would be greatly appreciated. I know this topic could probably be found in other threads, but I don't know about my individual needs.

Thanks,
Jarod
woodeneye is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 12-16-2017, 10:42 PM
Ole Woodworker
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 4,533
View BigJim's Photo Album My Photos
To me the newer planes that aren't real expensive may not have the better metal in their irons like the high dollar planes and the old Stanley planes. The good part is you can buy an old Stanley for about the same price as the cheaper planes.

The planes I have and don't really need any others are Stanley #12-101 trim plane #110 low angle block plane #3, #4c, #5 and #8c. I have a couple others. I also have a #46 and several really small planes.
4ND3R5 likes this.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
BigJim

If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
BigJim is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 12-16-2017, 10:56 PM
Village Idiot
 
epicfail48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Springfield MO
Posts: 4,903
View epicfail48's Photo Album My Photos
Planes are really simple tools, as long as the blade is sharp and the sole is flat they all work the same. The only things that separate the high and low end are fit and finish. Something like a Veritas plane will have a beautiful finish on the metal, buttery smooth adjustment mechanics and be ergonomically fantastic, whereas a Harbor Freight special will look like crap, be a touch more of a pain to adjust and might require a bit of TLC to clean up the metal and flatten the sole. Still though, a bit of work and the HF plane will preform just as well as the Veritas.

One thing to note, thats the plane itself, NOT the blade. The higher cost planes are more likely to come with a quality blade, a lower cost plane is more likely to have a crappy blade. Not really something to stress over though, a place like Hock Tools can get you set up for ~$40. So you figure, $20 for a cheap plane, $40 for a blade, $10 for some sandpaper to flatten the sole and you only come in at $70, bout $130 cheaper than a fancy one, and itll work just the same.

If you really want to have some fun, try making one:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/m...-plane-146649/

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
epicfail48 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 7 Old 12-16-2017, 11:33 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 811
View Terry Q's Photo Album My Photos
I bought an American made smoothing plane from ace hardware back in the early 80ís for $19.49. Never had much success using it, figured I was an idiot.

35 years later I pull it out, sharpen the plane, lap the bottom flat, and it still works like crap. Knowing what I now know the frog was machined improperly, and the mating surface between the frog and the body was never machined flat. Itís not worth the effort making it work properly. So yes, you can get worthless junk if youíre not careful.




In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
Terry Q is online now  
post #5 of 7 Old 12-17-2017, 01:54 AM
Junior Member
 
aaronww's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 22
View aaronww's Photo Album My Photos
Once you get your plane flat, and your iron sharp, it should work pretty well. Fettling a plane takes some getting used to so practice on some scrap wood. I have several planes by Stanley, a #4 and #7, a Stanley Defiance #4 and #5, as well as a Stanley 12Ĺ veneer scraper and a 12-151 spokeshave. I converted the Defiance #4 into a scrub plane. Having said all that, there's pretty much nothing the #5 and #7 can do that the #4 can't also do. The #4 is pretty much a shorter Jack and is so versatile that its what I do 95-99% of everything I do, which is also furniture making.

Mainly I would ask myself, does it do what you need it to do, and are you happy using it? If yes, then great! When I started out a few years ago, my first plane was the Defiance #4. It wasnt as easy to adjust as non-Defiance but it was $20 at an antique shop. The plane iron has to be adjusted with the tap of a hammer but when adjusted, it worked as well as my (newer to me but about 35 years older) other #4. For furniture making, rather than shell out for other planes, I'd suggest getting your hands on a new Stanley spokeshave like mine the 12-151. It'll run around $15-20 on Amazon and then keep an eye out for a router plane.

Just to add, I'd also suggest you check out Paul Sellers on YouTube. He does almost everything with just a #4.

All the best,
Aaron

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
aaronww is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 12-17-2017, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
Novice Member
 
woodeneye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Bethany, MO
Posts: 4
View woodeneye's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for all the information fellas. I think my knife snobbery may come in handy as sharpening wonít frustrate me. Iíll true this one up to start with and keep my eyes open as my needs expand. Many thanks.
Jarod
woodeneye is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 12-17-2017, 02:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 811
View Terry Q's Photo Album My Photos
Advice on Hand Planes

If you are looking at getting something new at a relatively inexpensive price, Rockler has a Bench Dog (in-house brand) set on sale for $200. Includes a smoother and low angle block plane.

http://www.rockler.com/bench-dog-too...moothing-plane


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
Terry Q is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advice for cabinet? bengoldberg General Woodworking Discussion 3 06-09-2017 10:50 AM
Need advice on squaring up beehives NCTarheel General Woodworking Discussion 2 03-07-2017 04:43 PM
8ft x 4ft farmhouse table advice charisk Joinery 4 04-05-2016 12:16 PM
Beginner looking for advice for a Lofted Bed Frame build SDuncan9 General Woodworking Discussion 3 03-19-2016 04:00 PM
Rustic dining table advice rookiewoodworker General Woodworking Discussion 18 09-19-2015 10:42 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome