Acquiring first hand plane tool...suggested sources? - Page 3 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #41 of 57 Old 06-22-2010, 08:37 AM
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Handles: Rosewood is named for the odor when freshly cut, not the color. You don't need anything but linseed oil or Ballistol and they will have a totally different appearance. I prefer the feel of oiled wood, polyurethane if you prefer. The red you saw, and can still see, at the base of the knob is paint. They painted the wood as well as selected parts - cheap and fast!

The brown metal is a thin surface rust. Browned metal is considered beautiful in some circumstances. Oil the metal to prevent rust and don't worry about it. If it really bugs you, you could have the metal parts replated. A lot of tools in the early 20th century were probably nickel plated, and then possibly followed by chrome plating. No rust and no contact dermatitis from the nickel! Just depends on what you want to spend.

The other alternative is to thoroughly clean the metal of any dirt and oil, japan it and then treat it to a trip to the oven - not gas, though. You don't want a source of combustion for the paint vapors! 150 for an hour should bake the paint on!

WD40 evaporates. My preference is Ballistol, which does anything WD40 does and is intended to work on wood and leather, too! Ballistol does not evaporate so the metal stays protected. We literally buy it by the gallon at Steppingstone Museum. I started using it in the mid-1990's.
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post #42 of 57 Old 06-22-2010, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
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No, the jappanning doesn't bother me, nor having the body painted (which is good because we don't have a non-gas oven around here!).

By linseed oil, do you mean "boiled" linseed oil? Because I've heard that mentioned a lot of times.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but linseed oil will preserve the wood without making it shiny, and polyurethane will preserve the wood and make it shiny. Is that a super simplification?
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post #43 of 57 Old 06-22-2010, 10:36 PM Thread Starter
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I'm sorry, but could you spell it out for me. Normally for finishes, I would try it on a hidden part of the object, but...well...that's not going to work with these handles, I've only got 1 set!

I bought boiled linseed oil and water based polyurethane. Do I need to use oil based poly because the linseed oil is oil based? I'm being driven crazy by the plethora of options for finishes and varnishes and poly's, oh my.

Could you please detail the steps for finishing the knob and handle? I just want it to look at beautiful natural wood as possible while being protected from my very sweaty grip.
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post #44 of 57 Old 06-23-2010, 03:59 PM
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Fun, isn't it! I told you this is a journey, not a destination! You never reach the end of the learning!

We used linseed oil for our rifle stocks in the Marine Corps. And, if it's good enough for a Marine's rifle, I think it will be good for your plane handles! If you use the linseed oil just put it on in coats until the wood isn't having any more. You can put the wooden parts in a container add oil and turn them once in a while for a few hours. Then remove and wipe dry. I would give the handle and knob 24 hours or so before use. If you want shiny rub on layers of the linseed oil and rub until it gets warm! You will develop a shine. I have seen rifle stocks that looked like glass. Wash your hands carefully after each coat!

Linseed oil used to be boiled so that it would polymerize. Now, they just put heavy metals in to catalyze the reaction. Don't use the stuff for food contact surfaces (cutting boards, rolling pins, salad bowls.

LSO will make the wood look as good as almost any finish, give some protection from water (sweat) and is easily touched up. Just make sure any rags are spread out to dry. Wadded up, you may get spontaneous combustion! Whoosh, Bang, Nasty. Actually no Bang, but a fire. Otherwise in an all-metal container with a tight metal lid. No plastic, this stuff can get hot!

Water-based Polyurethane will give a good appearance, but it is a film-forming finish and the beauty is skin deep. If it wears, and it will, you will need to sand and re-apply.
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post #45 of 57 Old 06-23-2010, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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Well nuts, I got the boiled linseed oil. Back to the store.....

So, linseed oil all by itself is good enough then...I don't need anything on top of that.

I agree, I have *so incredibly much* to learn...I just didn't want to learn on these handles. A few rounds of learning and sanding to fix it and I wouldn't have much handle left!!

And thanks for the advice about the rags...I had heard that from a mill owner and I couldn't remember which exactly chemicals it was that do that. I'm planning on spreading out any rags I use outside so they can dry and be OUTSIDE.
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post #46 of 57 Old 06-24-2010, 04:58 AM
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Nearly any oil will work well on your handles...BLO, Danish oil, tung oil...

Last edited by knotscott; 06-24-2010 at 05:01 AM.
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post #47 of 57 Old 06-24-2010, 10:00 AM
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Sorry! I wasn't clear. The "Boiled Linseed Oil" you buy is LSO mixed with drying agents (heavy metal catalysts) so it will polymerize. Linseed Oil will not polymerize or "dry" by itself. LSO is very flammable and boiling it is hazardous. The manufacturers just shifted the hazard to the user!

The label will say "Boiled Linseed Oil" regardless.

If you can make your way to Steppingstone Museum (www.steppingstonemuseum.org) at Havre de Grace, MD some Saturday, we can spend some time going over the care and feeding of planes. Bring them along! We'll make some room at a workbench and show you how to use them, too.
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post #48 of 57 Old 06-24-2010, 11:32 AM Thread Starter
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Thats a great offer that if time or distance permitted I would for sure take you up on.

A few in other forums had suggested BLO would make the handle too dark to really see the grain. I'd definitely like the grain to be noticeable. It was also suggested just to simply use wax and only wax to coat the handle. I have johnson's paste wax, but beeswax was the suggested type. Would wax bring out the grain color? If the paste wax I have onhand will do it, then it certainly seems the safest and simplest at this point.

Otherwise, what about BLO and then wax on top of that?
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post #49 of 57 Old 06-25-2010, 09:29 AM
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You could use either wax or use the oil and then wax. I would suggest you do a bit of experimenting and see which you prefer. The wax can be removed easily enough with rubbing alcohol. We are really getting into personal likes and dislikes here. It gets down to what brings a smile to you face when you see your tools and when you handle them!

For what it is worth, I would use the beeswax on the soles of the plane to reduce friction and boiled linseed oil on the wood, that being what you have. My preference is Ballistol everything and a touch of beeswax on the sole of metal and wooden planes. Non Disputans Degustibus! (There is no arguing with taste!)
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post #50 of 57 Old 06-25-2010, 09:33 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks! Ill take your recommendation directly. I've got a lot of experimenting and learning left to do before I learn what I actually like, and I'm pretty sure I won't got through enough handles and knobs to find what I like there.

I bought the paste wax to polish onto my machining surfaces, so I'll definitely put a coat on the bottom of the plane.

I will apply the BLO to the handle and knob then without any other added stuff, and we'll see what happens! thanks!
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post #51 of 57 Old 06-26-2010, 09:02 PM
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As the great philosopher, Rick Nelson, so cogently said "You can't please everyone, so you've got to please yourself!" They are your tools and have to suit you. Voyage and enjoy the trip, my friend!
If you can sail down the Susquehanna to HdeG, the bench has a place for you!
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post #52 of 57 Old 06-28-2010, 08:46 AM Thread Starter
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I went with a mix of about 50% BLO and 50% mineral spirits, as was mention in the "staining walnut" thread. I had thought the mix would lessen the darkening effect of the BLO. Well, if it did, I can't tell. Amusingly, the knob and handle are as dark now as when I first got the plane. I had assumed the knob and handle were just dark from age and dirt, but perhaps not.

Anyway, I can really see no grain now on the knob and barely some on the sides of the handle. Oh well. I know I can sand it and do it all over again, but I think I'll live with it for a while first. I probably should have just gone with the wax, and will next time.

The good news is that I learned something!! And that alone made it worth it! :D Thanks for all the input and suggestions.

By the way...do you guys preserve/keep your mixes like this? (the half and half mix?) I can't pour it back into the BLO container obviously, and I don't want to pour it down the drain (we have our own septic system here). For now I just put it safely in the outside barn and figured it'd evaporate away, but I didn't know if it was preservable for later use. I think the margarine container I used has a lid somewhere...
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post #53 of 57 Old 06-28-2010, 10:12 PM Thread Starter
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I learned another valuable lesson....Johnson's wax will turn the wood almost as dark as the BLO did!

I sanded the knob and handle back down, as I wasn't pleased with how dark the BLO/MS mixture had turned it. It was nice to see the grain again as I sanded it.

So this time I decided to just try Johnson's Paste Wax.

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The handle and knob were essentially the same color before I applied the wax to the knob. The knob isn't actually as dark as it was with the BLO, but still much darker than I'd like.

Is this just the way of things? Or would clear WB polycrylic protect it and NOT change its color?

Also, how do I remove the wax from the knob...with just mineral spirits? Or more sanding?
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post #54 of 57 Old 06-29-2010, 08:36 AM
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Because the knob is turned, you are seeing end grain, for all practical purposes. That always has a tendency to be darkened by finishes. With what's already been applied, you may have gone about as far as you can go.

Mineral spirits might and alcohol will remove the wax, the problem is removing all the wax. It will affect adhesion of subsequent finishes. If you like the looks of the handle (aka tote) stop and see how it feels when you work.

Besides, the real heart of the plane is the iron. Have you put as much effort into sharpening and tuning as in the wood? The tote and knob are lipstick and mascara.
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post #55 of 57 Old 06-29-2010, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuseumWood View Post
Besides, the real heart of the plane is the iron. The tote and knob are lipstick and mascara.
I think my wife can probably tell you which I'd be more drawn to devoting time to then....

Up until yesterday, I was waiting for my honing guide. It finally came, so it was time to flatten the sole of the plane and then sharpen the iron.

Unfortunately (or, as typical), the pieces of sandpaper I have are just about as big as the plane itself. I had read that I could just wet them down with mineral spirits and they would stick down to the glass and I could use them....well, unless they mean SOAKED with MS, that didn't work. So, I have the adhesive spray ready to go now, but I'm going to have to glue pieces end to end to have enough of a surface to move the plane across.

It got too late for me to try honing the actual iron. I'm going to use the sandpaper method for honing and see if it works for me, since that will be a lower entry point than going with stones. Fortunately for doing that, I don't need nearly as large of a piece of sandpaper so I think I can actually do that.
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post #56 of 57 Old 06-29-2010, 11:18 AM
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beelzerob, Nice to see a familiar name here (from cocoontech). I'll be starting my hand plane aquisition oddessey shortly as well, along with a shop full of other tools (oh, and a shop too).
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post #57 of 57 Old 06-29-2010, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
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hey now, there could be *two* beelzerob's out there....

Glad you found this place too! Cocoontech helped us further our HA addiction, and this site is fantastic for the woodworking addiction too.

Be sure and use the search feature when you have a question....9 times out of 10 when I was about to post what I thought would be a really unique question, it turns out it's already been asked. People here are nice, they won't nag you about not searching for stuff first, but it'll save you some time to find the previous posts.

And now, I haven't written a driver yet for CQC to control any of my power tools. Though I have considered some kind of "panic button" for the shop....
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