#80 scraper - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 09-05-2013, 10:42 PM Thread Starter
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#80 scraper

I've been using a #80 cabinet scraper for many years. I've experienced better performance over the years mostly due to better sharpening skills and blade set up.

Then I read the latest Fine Woodworking issue and it would seem all these years I've been missing a few details. Has anyone read the article and what did you think?

For me I never considered the thumb screw to be a way to adjust the depth of cut.

Also the way the author burnishes the edge.

What do you guys think?

Al

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post #2 of 19 Old 09-06-2013, 07:51 AM
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I can't comment on his burnishing technique without seeing the article, but the thumbscrew is the way to adjust the depth of the cut.

Joe B. 41
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post #3 of 19 Old 09-06-2013, 08:26 AM
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I have the Veritas version of the #80, and so I learned from the instructions that came with it. I don't get Fine Woodworking, either. Did they have advice that differed substaintially from Lee Valley?
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post #4 of 19 Old 09-06-2013, 10:38 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeb41
I can't comment on his burnishing technique without seeing the article, but the thumbscrew is the way to adjust the depth of the cut.
This guy said in the article to make several passes with the burnishing tool starting out close to 45deg. and then finishing at 90deg. Then he uses a pointed burnishing tool to lift the edge. Placing the blade flat on the bench and then run the point under the burr from one end to the other. I had never seen this before.

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post #5 of 19 Old 09-06-2013, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilgaron
I have the Veritas version of the #80, and so I learned from the instructions that came with it. I don't get Fine Woodworking, either. Did they have advice that differed substaintially from Lee Valley?
I don't know LV but I'm going to check.

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post #6 of 19 Old 09-07-2013, 09:13 AM Thread Starter
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I'd certainly like to here from anyone that cares to share their methods with this tool.

Al

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post #7 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 12:27 PM
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Al, I initially felt no need to reply as I have not read the article... I don't subscribe to FW nor do I have any desire to encourage the them along the strayed path from productive writing by buying a copy for that article alone.

That said, I stumbled across this and figured it was in reference to the same article. I do try to keep a eye on who is doing what and Sellers does have a lot of good information out there. Granted I disagree on some points but that is bound to happen - we are men not sheep, lol.

Enjoy:
http://paulsellers.com/2013/07/fine-...teries-busted/
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post #8 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 03:45 PM Thread Starter
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Fire
As mags go its hard to find a better one. Granted they don't get my vote on everything but they are miles ahead of the rest. I'm finding it hard to read or get anything out of most mags but FW fits my desires better than most. Hey want to see my latest cutting board I made with two kinds of wood? :)

Hey if you sport an 80 and use it, what works for you?

Al

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post #9 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
Fire
As mags go its hard to find a better one. Granted they don't get my vote on everything but they are miles ahead of the rest. I'm finding it hard to read or get anything out of most mags but FW fits my desires better than most. Hey want to see my latest cutting board I made with two kinds of wood? :)

Hey if you sport an 80 and use it, what works for you?

Al

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ehhh, I just really haven't found magazines to be all that fruitful. With the number of advertisements they should be giving most magazines away for free.

I don't use an 80 - I've always been partial to card scrapers and use a shop build scraper plane for anything large. So again, I really can't comment on the 80 in particular.
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post #10 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 04:23 PM
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Well. (long pause) I have an #80. I don't use it although it will work. I do use card scrapers and have a few scraper planes I love. The #112 is still my favorite, although the #12 works pretty fine. I didn't read the article but did read the link to Paul Sellers, because Like Jean, I think Paul is usually pretty straight forward. We don't always agree, but closer than most magazines.

I sharpen with a file, a hard stone and a burnisher. If i needed to sand after, i gues I would question the point.
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post #11 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 04:52 PM
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80 scraper

Having bought one of these at a flea market a few weeks ago, I totally enjoyed this debate. Just a grain of salt was all that was needed. I figured out how to use and set this thing up with a minimal amount of deduction. The correct angle of the grind was the missing link. I see this as a question of need in relation to surface required : finer surface / more burnishing , etc.. But how do you protect yourself from the edges of the blade sticking up?
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post #12 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 09:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timetestedtools
Well. (long pause) I have an #80. I don't use it although it will work. I do use card scrapers and have a few scraper planes I love. The #112 is still my favorite, although the #12 works pretty fine. I didn't read the article but did read the link to Paul Sellers, because Like Jean, I think Paul is usually pretty straight forward. We don't always agree, but closer than most magazines.

I sharpen with a file, a hard stone and a burnisher. If i needed to sand after, i gues I would question the point.
I think If I had a #112 I wouldn't use the 80 either. I've been looking for one in need of a home. I think Paul is really splitting hairs on some of his points. Thanks for your input.

Al

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post #13 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 09:49 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Brown
Having bought one of these at a flea market a few weeks ago, I totally enjoyed this debate. Just a grain of salt was all that was needed. I figured out how to use and set this thing up with a minimal amount of deduction. The correct angle of the grind was the missing link. I see this as a question of need in relation to surface required : finer surface / more burnishing , etc.. But how do you protect yourself from the edges of the blade sticking up?
I used to sharpen both edges and flip it when needed. I haven't had too much trouble with it sticking up. Thanks for your in put.

Al

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post #14 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firemedic

ehhh, I just really haven't found magazines to be all that fruitful. With the number of advertisements they should be giving most magazines away for free.

I don't use an 80 - I've always been partial to card scrapers and use a shop build scraper plane for anything large. So again, I really can't comment on the 80 in particular.
Shop built? Is there a plan or needed kit for that? I had in mind to build one when I saw the prices the #112 was going for.

Al

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post #15 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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Okay here's my take on the #80.

I find the most important step is to get it sharp and get the hook perfect. Seems there is a fine line between making it "sing" and working fine. I used to file, burnish and reload. Now I file with a fixture to hold the angle then sharpen/hone and burnish.

I don't see much merit in using the thumb screw to set or change the depth of cut. This is one of the problems I had with the FWW article. I set the blade in place on top of a very flat board, tighten the screws a little then with the lightest tap on the top of the blade, set the finest fraction of depth. Then tighten down the screws. Then with the thumb screw I snug it up to the blade just enough to give it a fraction of a bend and keep the blade from chattering. I get a wider cut.

I have never seen a burnisher with a cone on the end of it to run under the hook to lift it to the correct angle. Seems hard to do and risky.

Al

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post #16 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 10:25 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilgaron
I have the Veritas version of the #80, and so I learned from the instructions that came with it. I don't get Fine Woodworking, either. Did they have advice that differed substaintially from Lee Valley?
Good for you. Is the rear sole really longer? The LV instructions are how I use the tool. The article was another thing with steps I have never seen.

Al

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post #17 of 19 Old 09-09-2013, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Brown
Having bought one of these at a flea market a few weeks ago, I totally enjoyed this debate. Just a grain of salt was all that was needed. I figured out how to use and set this thing up with a minimal amount of deduction. The correct angle of the grind was the missing link. I see this as a question of need in relation to surface required : finer surface / more burnishing , etc.. But how do you protect yourself from the edges of the blade sticking up?
Rob

Good deal for you getting into the tool. By now you have experienced why it's a must have tool. Sounds like your off to a good start. It only gets better from here.

Al

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post #18 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 04:43 PM
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80 scraper

So, just for grins, I put the 80 to work briefly. First I took a file and straightened out the edge, which was worn heavily in the center. Then I used my bench grinder to put a 45 angle on it. Then I just used the shaft of a screwdriver to burnish the edge. Crude? Yep! That was a month ago and it has been sitting on the shelf since then. Last night I used it to quickly flatten out a high spot on the end of my work bench and clean it up all in 3 minutes. Then I backed off on the thumb screw and put it back on the shelf. This is an awesome tool and properly sharpened would be a miracle worker on some figured wood. I promise to do a proper job of honing and sharpening before I continue any use!
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post #19 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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Rob
It should come in to play on all your glue ups. I used mine for years and never honed it. The cut was there but not as close to finish.

Al

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